Results for 'Julia Ridley'

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  1.  7
    The Impact of Caregiving on the Association Between Infant Emotional Behavior and Resting State Neural Network Functional Topology.Lindsay C. Hanford, Vincent J. Schmithorst, Ashok Panigrahy, Vincent Lee, Julia Ridley, Lisa Bonar, Amelia Versace, Alison E. Hipwell & Mary L. Phillips - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  2. An introduction to Plato's Republic.Julia Annas - 1981 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    This interpretive introduction provides unique insight into Plato's Republic. Stressing Plato's desire to stimulate philosophical thinking in his readers, Julia Annas here demonstrates the coherence of his main moral argument on the nature of justice, and expounds related concepts of education, human motivation, knowledge and understanding. In a clear systematic fashion, this book shows that modern moral philosophy still has much to learn from Plato's attempt to move the focus from questions of what acts the just person ought to (...)
  3.  75
    Hellenistic Philosophy of Mind.Julia E. Annas - 1992 - University of California Press.
    "Hellenistic Philosophy of Mind" is an elegant survey of Stoic and Epicurean ideas about the soul an introduction to two ancient schools whose belief in the soul's physicality offer compelling parallels to modern approaches in the ...
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  4.  73
    Review: On Virtue Ethics.Julia Driver - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (1):122.
    Rosalind Hursthouse has written an excellent book, in which she develops a neo-Aristotelian virtue ethics that she sees as avoiding some of the major criticisms leveled against virtue ethics in general, and against Aristotle's brand of virtue ethics in particular.
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  5. Plato and Aristotle on friendship and altruism.Julia Annas - 1977 - Mind 86 (344):532-554.
  6. The dynamics of moral progress.Julia Hermann - 2019 - Ratio 32 (4):300-311.
    Assuming that there is moral progress, and assuming that the abolition of slavery is an example of it, how does moral progress occur? Is it mainly driven by specific individuals who have gained new moral insights, or by changes in the socio‐economic and epistemic conditions in which agents morally judge the norms and practices of their society, and act upon these judgements? In this paper, I argue that moral progress is a complex process in which changes at the level of (...)
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  7.  49
    Leibniz on Causation and Agency.Julia Jorati - 2017 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This book presents a comprehensive examination of Gottfried Leibniz's views on the nature of agents and their actions. Julia Jorati offers a fresh look at controversial topics including Leibniz's doctrines of teleology, the causation of spontaneous changes within substances, divine concurrence, freedom, and contingency, and also discusses widely neglected issues such as his theories of moral responsibility, control, attributability, and compulsion. Rather than focusing exclusively on human agency, she explores the activities of non-rational substances and the differences between distinctive (...)
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  8.  51
    Reinforcement learning: A brief guide for philosophers of mind.Julia Haas - 2022 - Philosophy Compass 17 (9):e12865.
    In this opinionated review, I draw attention to some of the contributions reinforcement learning can make to questions in the philosophy of mind. In particular, I highlight reinforcement learning's foundational emphasis on the role of reward in agent learning, and canvass two ways in which the framework may advance our understanding of perception and motivation.
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  9.  95
    Should I pretend I'm perfect?Julia Staffel - 2017 - Res Philosophica 94 (2):301-324.
    Ideal agents are role models whose perfection in some normative domain we try to approximate. But which form should this striving take? It is well known that following ideal rules of practical reasoning can have disastrous results for non-ideal agents. Yet, this issue has not been explored with respect to rules of theoretical reasoning. I show how we can extend Bayesian models of ideally rational agents in order to pose and answer the question of whether non-ideal agents should form new (...)
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  10. "Self-Knowledge in Early Plato".Julia Annas - 1985 - In Dominic J. O'Meara (ed.), Platonic Investigations. Catholic University of Amer Press. pp. 111-138.
  11.  43
    Russian Thinkers.Julia Annas, Isaiah Berlin, Henry Hardy & Aileen Kelly - 1980 - Philosophical Quarterly 30 (121):357.
  12. Luck and Fortune in Moral Evaluation.Julia Driver - 2013 - In Martijn Blaauw (ed.), Contrastivism in philosophy. New York: Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group.
     
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  13. Playing the rule-following game.Julia Tanney - 2000 - Philosophy 75 (292):203-224.
    This paper argues that there is something deeply wrong with the attempt to give rule-following explanations of broadly rational activities. It thus supports the view that rational norms are part of the ”bedrock’ and it challenges the widespread strategy of attempting to explain an individual’s rational or linguistic abilities by attributing to her knowledge of a theory of some kind. The theorist who would attempt to attribute knowledge of norms to an individual in order to explain her ability to act (...)
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  14.  36
    Exploring Political Corporate Social Responsibility in Global Supply Chains.Julia Patrizia Rotter, Peppi-Emilia Airike & Cecilia Mark-Herbert - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (4):1-19.
    Businesses increasingly assume political roles, despite issues of legitimacy. The presented two case studies illustrate how businesses harness their political influence in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) practices through collaboration and dialog with stakeholders and civil society actors. These cases are set around issues arising in global supply chains in sourcing activities where the core problem is associated with businesses managing extended responsibilities under conflicting institutional conditions. The article seeks to provide empirical examples of Political CSR and illustrates the role of (...)
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  15.  99
    The Relationship Between Sustainable Supply Chain Management, Stakeholder Pressure and Corporate Sustainability Performance.Julia Wolf - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 119 (3):317-328.
    In 2009, Greenpeace launched an aggressive campaign against Nestlé, accusing the organization of driving rainforest deforestation through its palm oil suppliers. The objective was to damage the brand image of Nestlé and, thereby, force the organization to make its supply chain more sustainable. Prominent cases such as these have led to the prevailing view that sustainable supply chain management is primarily reactive and propelled by external pressures. This research, in contrast, assumes that SSCM can contribute positively to the reputation of (...)
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  16. Gertrude Elizabeth Margaret Anscombe.Julia Driver - 2009 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  17.  19
    Consensual qualitative research on free associations for compassion and self-compassion.Júlia Halamová, Martina Baránková, Bronislava Strnádelová & Jana koróniová - 2018 - Human Affairs 28 (3):253-270.
    The aim of our study was to explore the first three associations for the following two stimulus words: compassion and self-compassion. In addition, we were interested in whether the participants would conceptualise these words more in terms of emotions, cognitions, or behaviours. The sample consisted of 151 psychology students. A consensual qualitative research approach was adopted. Three members of the core team and an auditor analysed the free associations of compassion and self-compassion. The data showed that there were four domains (...)
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  18. An empirical solution to the puzzle of weakness of will.Julia Haas - 2018 - Synthese (12):1-21.
    This paper presents an empirical solution to the puzzle of weakness of will. Specifically, it presents a theory of action, grounded in contemporary cognitive neuroscientific accounts of decision making, that explains the phenomenon of weakness of will without resulting in a puzzle.
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  19. Imagination de-naturalized: phantasy, the imaginary, and imaginative ontology.Julia Jansen - 2018 - In Dan Zahavi (ed.), Oxford Handbook of the History of Phenomenology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
     
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  20.  71
    Moral Gridworlds: A Theoretical Proposal for Modeling Artificial Moral Cognition.Julia Haas - 2020 - Minds and Machines 30 (2):219-246.
    I describe a suite of reinforcement learning environments in which artificial agents learn to value and respond to moral content and contexts. I illustrate the core principles of the framework by characterizing one such environment, or “gridworld,” in which an agent learns to trade-off between monetary profit and fair dealing, as applied in a standard behavioral economic paradigm. I then highlight the core technical and philosophical advantages of the learning approach for modeling moral cognition, and for addressing the so-called value (...)
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  21. Moral sense and sentimentalism.Julia Driver - 2013 - In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 358.
    This chapter focuses on sentimentalism – the view that morality is based on sentiment – in particular, the sentiment of sympathy. Sentimentalism was historically articulated in opposition to two positions: Hobbesian egoism, in which morality is based on self-interest; and Moral Rationalism, which held that morality is based on reason alone. The Sentimentalists challenged both views, arguing that there is more to what motivates human beings than simple self-interest and that reason alone is insufficient to motivate our actions, including our (...)
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  22. Why reasons may not be causes.Julia Tanney - 1995 - Mind and Language 10 (1-2):103-126.
    This paper considers Davidson's (1963) arguments for construing reasons as causes and attempts to show that he has failed to provide positive reasons for introducing causation into his analysis of rationalizing explanation. I consider various ways of spelling out his intuition that something is missing from explanation if we consider only the justificatory relation between reasons and action, and I argue that to the extent that there is anything missing, it should not be provided by construing reasons as causes. What (...)
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  23.  28
    The influence of math anxiety on symbolic and non-symbolic magnitude processing.Julia F. Dietrich, Stefan Huber, Korbinian Moeller & Elise Klein - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  24.  21
    Cyberbullying Among Adolescent Bystanders: Role of Affective Versus Cognitive Empathy in Increasing Prosocial Cyberbystander Behavior.Julia Barlińska, Anna Szuster & Mikołaj Winiewski - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  25.  20
    A life cycle model of multi-stakeholder networks.Julia Roloff - 2008 - Business Ethics: A European Review 17 (3):311-325.
    In multi‐stakeholder networks, actors from civil society, business and governmental institutions come together in order to find a common solution to a problem that affects all of them. Problems approached by such networks often affect people across national boundaries, tend to be very complex and are not sufficiently understood. In multi‐stakeholder networks, information concerning a problem is gathered from different sources, learning takes place, conflicts between participants are addressed and cooperation is sought. Corporations are key actors in many networks, because (...)
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  26.  58
    De-individualizing norms of rationality.Julia Tanney - 1995 - Philosophical Studies 79 (3):237 - 258.
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  27.  49
    Happiness as achievement.Julia Annas - 2004 - Daedalus 133 (2):44-51.
    One of the best places to seek understanding of happiness is the study of ancient ethical theories and of those modern theories which share their eudaimonist concerns. For these recognize, and build on, some of our thoughts about happiness that have become overwhelmed by the kind of consideration that emerges in the claim that happiness is obviously subjective. Given the systematically disappointing results of the database approach, it is time to look seriously at our alternatives.
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  28.  20
    What is the message of the robot medium? Considering media ecology and mobilities in critical robotics research.Julia M. Hildebrand - 2022 - AI and Society 37 (2):443-453.
    This article makes the case for including frameworks of media ecology and mobilities research in the shaping of critical robotics research for a human-centered and holistic lens onto robot technologies. The two meta-disciplines, which align in their attention to relational processes of communication and movement, provide useful tools for critically exploring emerging human–robot dimensions and dynamics. Media ecology approaches human-made technologies as media that can shape the way we think, feel, and act. Relatedly, mobilities research highlights various kinds of influential (...)
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  29.  41
    The neurocognitive consequences of the wandering mind: a mechanistic account of sensory-motor decoupling.Julia W. Y. Kam & Todd C. Handy - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4.
  30.  23
    A longitudinal experimental study comparing the effectiveness of happiness-enhancing strategies in Anglo Americans and Asian Americans.Julia K. Boehm, Sonja Lyubomirsky & Kennon M. Sheldon - 2011 - Cognition and Emotion 25 (7):1263-1272.
  31. Computable Boolean algebras.Julia F. Knight & Michael Stob - 2000 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 65 (4):1605-1623.
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  32.  20
    Divine Faculties and the Puzzle of Incompossibility.Julia Jorati - 2016 - In Brown Gregory & Yual Chiek (eds.), Leibniz on Compossibility and Possible Worlds. Cham: Springer. pp. 175–199.
    Leibniz maintains that even though God’s intellect contains all possibles, some of these possibles are not compossible. This incompossibility of some possibles is supposed to explain which collections of possibles are possible worlds and why God does not actualize the collection of all possibles. In order to fully understand how this works, we need to establish what precisely Leibniz takes to be the source of incompossibility, that is, which divine attribute or faculty gives rise to the incompossibility of certain possibles. (...)
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  33.  56
    New Forms of Revolt.Julia Kristeva - 2014 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 22 (2):1-19.
    Popular uprisings, indignant youth, toppled dictators, oligarchic presidents dismissed, hopes dashed, liberties crushed in prisons, fixed trials, and bloodbaths. How are we to read these images? Could revolt, or what is called “riot” on the Web, be waking humanity from its dream of hyperconnectedness? Or could it just be a trick played on us so that the culture of spectacle can last longer? But what “revolt” are we talking about? Is it even possible?
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  34. Loving the Body, Loving the Soul: Conway’s Vitalist Critique of Cartesian and Morean Dualism.Julia Borcherding - 2019 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 9.
    In this paper, I examine Anne Conway’s ‘argument from love’ in her Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy. This argument, supported by a further argument, the ‘argument from pain’, undermines the dualist dichotomy between mind and matter by appealing to a vitalist similarity principle. My goal is two-fold: first, to contribute to a close systematic reconstruction and analysis of Conway’s arguments, which so far is largely lacking in the literature; second, to show that these arguments are richer and (...)
     
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  35.  32
    How are We to Live? Ethics in an Age of Self-Interest.Julia Driver - 1997 - Philosophical Review 106 (1):125.
    Peter Singer is well known as an ethicist who has contributed much to current debates in ethics and public policy. He has published on topics ranging from vegetarianism to famine relief to bioethics, always with something interesting to say, and often with something provocative as well. How Are We to Live? adds to Singer’s work in the area of applied, or practical, ethics. This book is not as deeply challenging as some of Singer’s earlier work. However, it is not intended (...)
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  36.  25
    The influence of negative stimulus features on conflict adaption: evidence from fluency of processing.Julia Fritz, Rico Fischer & Gesine Dreisbach - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  37. Three Puzzles about Lotteries.Julia Staffel - 2020 - In Igor Douven (ed.), Lotteries, Knowledge, and Rational Belief: Essays on the Lottery Paradox. New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    In this article, I discuss three distinct but related puzzles involving lotteries: Kyburg’s lottery paradox, the statistical evidence problem, and the Harman-Vogel paradox. Kyburg’s lottery paradox is the following well-known problem: if we identify rational outright belief with a rational credence above a threshold, we seem to be forced to admit either that one can have inconsistent rational beliefs, or that one cannot rationally believe anything one is not certain of. The statistical evidence problem arises from the observation that people (...)
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  38.  94
    Private Blame.Julia Driver - 2016 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 10 (2):215-220.
    This paper explores a problem for Michael McKenna’s conversation model of moral responsibility that views blame as characteristically part of a conversational exchange. The problem for this model on which this paper focuses is the problem of private blame. Sometimes when we blame we do so without any intention to engage in a communicative exchange. It is argued that McKenna’s model cannot adequately account for private blame.
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  39.  6
    mit und in seiner Umwelt geboren“„being born with and in its environment.Julia Gruevska - 2019 - NTM Zeitschrift für Geschichte der Wissenschaften, Technik und Medizin 27 (3):343-375.
    ZusammenfassungDer niederländische Tierpsychologe Frederik J. J. Buytendijk (1887–1974) entwickelte in seinen Forschungen der 1920er und 1930er Jahre in Abgrenzung zum Behaviorismus eine antireduktionistische Zugangsweise auf Verhaltensexperimente. So bezog er in seinen Experimentalpraktiken explizit die subjektive Erfahrung des Versuchsleiters mit ein. Damit entwarf Buytendijk eine Wissenschaftstheorie, die methodologisch auf die Phänomenologie, Hermeneutik wie auf gestalttheoretische Ganzheitskonzepte zurückgriff, quantitative Datenerhebungen aber dennoch nicht aufgab. Vielmehr untersuchte Buytendijk auf der Grundlage des Biotheoretikers Jakob von Uexküll (1864–1944) in seinem physiologischen Institut in Groningen konkret (...)
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  40.  85
    Hyperactive ethics.Julia Driver - 1994 - Philosophical Quarterly 44 (174):9-25.
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  41.  24
    Two theorems on degrees of models of true arithmetic.Julia Knight, Alistair H. Lachlan & Robert I. Soare - 1984 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 49 (2):425-436.
  42.  87
    Self-knowledge, normativity, and construction.Julia Tanney - 2002 - In Anthony O'Hear (ed.), Logic, Thought and Language. Cambridge University Press. pp. 37-55.
    1. Much of modern and contemporary philosophy of mind in the ‘analytic’ tradition has presupposed, since Descartes, what might be called a realist view about the mind and the mental. According to this view there are independently existing, determinate items (states, events, dispositions or relations) that are the truth-conferrers of our ascriptions of mental predicates.[1] The view is also a cognitivist one insofar as it holds that when we correctly ascribe such a predicate to an individual the correctness consists in (...)
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  43.  10
    Existential Definability in Arithmetic.Julia Robinson - 1955 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 20 (2):182-183.
  44.  49
    The empathic skill fiction can’t teach us.Julia Langkau - 2020 - Philosophical Psychology 33 (3):313-331.
    This paper argues that a crucial skill needed to empathize with others cannot be trained by reading fiction: the skill of reading the evidence for the other person’s state of mind and, thus, empath...
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  45.  14
    Null Findings, Replications and Preregistered Studies in Business Ethics Research.Julia Roloff & Michael J. Zyphur - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (3):609-619.
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  46. Kant, Heidegger, Henry : Geschichte einer Ontologisierung.Julia Scheidegger - 2013 - In Stephan Grätzel & Frédéric Seyler (eds.), Sein, Existenz, Leben: Michel Henry und Martin Heidegger. Freiburg: Verlag Karl Alber.
  47. Politische Distanz. Zur Schopenhauer-Rezeption Thomas Manns in den Jahren der Emigration.Julia Schöll - 2004 - Schopenhauer Jahrbuch 85:109-130.
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  48. The Secret Chain: A Limited Defense of Sympathy.Julia Driver - 2011 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 49 (s1):234-238.
    This paper responds to criticisms of sympathy-based approaches to ethics made by Jesse Prinz, focusing on the criticism that emotions are too variable to form a basis for ethics. I draw on the idea, articulated by early sentimentalists such as Hutcheson and Hume, that proper reliance on sympathy is subject to a corrective procedure in order, in part, to avoid the variability problem.
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  49. Bayesian Norms and Non-Ideal Agents.Julia Staffel - 2024 - In Maria Lasonen-Aarnio & Clayton Littlejohn (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Evidence. New York, NY: Routledge.
    Bayesian epistemology provides a popular and powerful framework for modeling rational norms on credences, including how rational agents should respond to evidence. The framework is built on the assumption that ideally rational agents have credences, or degrees of belief, that are representable by numbers that obey the axioms of probability. From there, further constraints are proposed regarding which credence assignments are rationally permissible, and how rational agents’ credences should change upon learning new evidence. While the details are hotly disputed, all (...)
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  50.  2
    8. Dramatis Personae: Nietzsche, Culture, and Human Types.David Owen & Aaron Ridley - 2000 - In Alan D. Schrift (ed.), Why Nietzsche Still?: Reflections on Drama, Culture, and Politics. University of California Press. pp. 136-153.
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