Results for 'Judy Tidwell'

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  1.  67
    Do Undergraduate Student Research Participants Read Psychological Research Consent Forms? Examining Memory Effects, Condition Effects, and Individual Differences.Eric R. Pedersen, Clayton Neighbors, Judy Tidwell & Ty W. Lostutter - 2011 - Ethics and Behavior 21 (4):332 - 350.
    Although research has examined factors influencing understanding of informed consent in biomedical and forensic research, less is known about participants' attention to details in consent documents in psychological survey research. The present study used a randomized experimental design and found the majority of participants were unable to recall information from the consent form in both in-person and online formats. Participants were also relatively poor at recognizing important aspects of the consent form including risks to participants and confidentiality procedures. Memory effects (...)
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  2.  43
    Neuroethics: Defining the Issues in Theory, Practice, and Policy.Judy Illes (ed.) - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    Recent advances in the brain sciences have dramatically improved our understanding of brain function. As we find out more and more about what makes us tick, we must stop and consider the ethical implications of this new found knowledge. This ground-breaking book on the emerging field of neuroethics answers many pertinent questions, such as: What makes monitoring and manipulating the human brain so ethically challenging? Will having a new biology of the brain through imaging make us less responsible for our (...)
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  3.  25
    Neuroethics: Defining the Issues in Theory, Practice, and Policy.Judy Illes (ed.) - 2005 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Recent advances in the brain sciences have dramatically improved our understanding of brain function. As we find out more and more about what makes us tick, we must stop and consider the ethical implications of this new found knowledge. Will having a new biology of the brain through imaging make us less responsible for our behavior and lose our free will? Should certain brain scan studies be disallowed on the basis of moral grounds? Why is the media so interested in (...)
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  4.  32
    Ethics, Safety and Managers.Alan Tidwell - 2000 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 19 (3-4):161-180.
  5.  44
    Engaging Fringe Stakeholders in Business and Society Research: Applying Visual Participatory Research Methods.Judy N. Muthuri & Lauren McCarthy - 2018 - Business and Society 57 (1):131-173.
    Business and society researchers, as well as practitioners, have been critiqued for ignoring those with less voice and power often referred to as “fringe stakeholders.” Existing methods used in B&S research often fail to address issues of meaningful participation, voice and power, especially in developing countries. In this article, we stress the utility of visual participatory research methods in B&S research to fill this gap. Through a case study on engaging Ghanaian cocoa farmers on gender inequality issues, we explore how (...)
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  6.  36
    Health Disparities for Canada’s Remote and Northern Residents: Can COVID-19 Help Level the Field?Judy Gillespie - 2023 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 20 (2):207-213.
    This paper reviews major structural drivers of place-based health disparities in the context of Canada, an industrialized nation with a strong public health system. Likelihood that the COVID-19 pandemic will facilitate rejuvenation of Canada’s northern and remote areas through remote working, advances in online teaching and learning, and the increased use of telemedicine are also examined. The paper concludes by identifying some common themes to address healthcare disparities for northern and remote Canadian residents.
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  7.  83
    Oxford Handbook of Neuroethics.Judy Illes & Barbara J. Sahakian (eds.) - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    The handbook contains more than 50 chapters by leaders from around the world and a broad range of sectors of academia and clinical practice spanning the ...
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  8.  34
    The role of data custodians in establishing and maintaining social licence for health research.Judy Allen, Carolyn Adams & Felicity Flack - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (4):502-510.
    In this article we explore the role of data custodians in establishing and maintaining social licence for the use of personal information in health research. Personal information from population‐level data collections can be used to make significant contributions to health and medical research, but this use is dependent on community acceptance or a social licence. We conducted semi‐structured interviews with data custodians across Australia to better understand data custodians’ views on their roles and responsibilities. This inductive, thematic analysis of the (...)
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  9.  28
    General Physiology, Experimental Psychology, and Evolutionism.Judy Johns Schloegel & Henning Schmidgen - 2002 - Isis 93 (4):614-645.
  10.  35
    The Emerging Profession of Mediation in Australia.Alan C. Tidwell - 1998 - Professional Ethics, a Multidisciplinary Journal 6 (3-4):185-198.
  11.  15
    The Emerging Profession of Mediation in Australia.Alan C. Tidwell - 1998 - Professional Ethics, a Multidisciplinary Journal 6 (3):185-198.
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  12.  18
    Neurologisms.Judy Illes - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (9):1-1.
  13.  35
    An Integrated Approach to Implementing ‹Community Participation’ in Corporate Community Involvement: Lessons from Magadi Soda Company in Kenya.Judy N. Muthuri, Wendy Chapple & Jeremy Moon - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S2):431-444.
    Corporate community involvement is often regarded as means of development in developing countries. However, CCI is often criticised for patronage and insensitivity both to context and local priorities. A key concern is the extent of 'community participation' in corporate social decision-making. Community participation in CCI offers an opportunity for these criticisms to be addressed. This paper presents findings of research examining community participation in CCI governance undertaken by Magadi Soda Company in Kenya. We draw on socio-political governance and interaction theories (...)
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  14. Teaching literacy through social studies under No Child Left Behind.Judy Pace - 2012 - Journal of Social Studies Research 36 (4).
     
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  15.  14
    Oxford Handbook of Neuroethics.Judy Illes & Barbara J. Sahakian (eds.) - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    A landmark in the scientific literature, the Oxford Handbook of Neuroethics presents a pioneering review of a topic central to the biosciences. It breaks new ground in bringing together leading neuroscientists, philosophers, and lawyers to tackle some of the most significant ethical issues that face us now and will continue to do so.
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  16.  81
    Reconsidering the value of consent in biobank research.Judy Allen & Beverley Mcnamara - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (3):155-166.
    Biobanks for long-term research pose challenges to the legal and ethical validity of consent to participate. Different models of consent have been proposed to answer some of these challenges. This paper contributes to this discussion by considering the meaning and value of consent to participants in biobanks. Empirical data from a qualitative study is used to provide a participant view of the consent process and to demonstrate that, despite limited understanding of the research, consent provides the research participants with some (...)
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  17.  5
    Sentient Flesh: Thinking in Disorder, Poiesis in Black.R. A. Judy - 2020 - Duke University Press.
    In _Sentient Flesh _R. A. Judy takes up freedman Tom Windham’s 1937 remark “we should have our liberty 'cause... us is human flesh" as a point of departure for an extended meditation on questions of the human, epistemology, and the historical ways in which the black being is understood. Drawing on numerous fields, from literary theory and musicology, to political theory and phenomenology, as well as Greek and Arabic philosophy, Judy engages literary texts and performative practices such as (...)
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  18. Brain preparation before a voluntary action: Evidence against unconscious movement initiation.Judy Trevena & Jeff Miller - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):447-456.
    Benjamin Libet has argued that electrophysiological signs of cortical movement preparation are present before people report having made a conscious decision to move, and that these signs constitute evidence that voluntary movements are initiated unconsciously. This controversial conclusion depends critically on the assumption that the electrophysiological signs recorded by Libet, Gleason, Wright, and Pearl are associated only with preparation for movement. We tested that assumption by comparing the electrophysiological signs before a decision to move with signs present before a decision (...)
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  19.  11
    Reconsidering the Value of Consent in Biobank Research.Beverley Mcnamara Judy Allen - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (3):155-166.
    ABSTRACT Biobanks for long‐term research pose challenges to the legal and ethical validity of consent to participate. Different models of consent have been proposed to answer some of these challenges. This paper contributes to this discussion by considering the meaning and value of consent to participants in biobanks. Empirical data from a qualitative study is used to provide a participant view of the consent process and to demonstrate that, despite limited understanding of the research, consent provides the research participants with (...)
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  20.  45
    Strategic reputation risk management.Judy Larkin - 2003 - New York: Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Reputation is a commercially valuable asset. This book focuses upon how enhanced reputation can contribute to commercial asset management through increased share price premium and competitive performance, while reputation loss can significantly erode the ability of the business to successfully retain market share, maximize shareholder value, raise finance, manage debt, and remain independent. It provides practical models and checklists designed to plan reputation management and risk communication strategies.
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  21. Imaging or imagining? A neuroethics challenge informed by genetics.Judy Illes & Eric Racine - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2):5 – 18.
    From a twenty-first century partnership between bioethics and neuroscience, the modern field of neuroethics is emerging, and technologies enabling functional neuroimaging with unprecedented sensitivity have brought new ethical, social and legal issues to the forefront. Some issues, akin to those surrounding modern genetics, raise critical questions regarding prediction of disease, privacy and identity. However, with new and still-evolving insights into our neurobiology and previously unquantifiable features of profoundly personal behaviors such as social attitude, value and moral agency, the difficulty of (...)
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  22.  26
    A Cross-Cultural Neuroethics View on the Language of Disability.Judy Illes & Hayami Lou - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (2):75-84.
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  23.  72
    An Institutional Analysis of Corporate Social Responsibility in Kenya.Judy N. Muthuri & Victoria Gilbert - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (3):467 - 483.
    There is little doubt that Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is now a global concept and a prominent feature of international business, with its practice localised and differing across countries. Despite the growing body of research focussing on CSR in developing countries, there is dearth research on CSR institutionalisation in African countries. Drawing on institutional theory (IT), this article examines the focus and form of CSR practice of companies in Kenya. It is evident from our findings that the nature and orientation (...)
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  24.  26
    A Pragmatist Reading of Mary Parker Follett's Integrative Process.Judy Whipps - 2014 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (3):405.
    For most of the 20th century Mary Parker Follett (1868–1933) was one of the “invisible women” in the history of American philosophy, although her work was taken seriously by philosophers of her time. While some have described Follett as an idealist, this essay develops the pragmatist and feminist elements of Follett’s philosophy. In particular, Follett’s concept of “integration” can be clarified by reading it through a pragmatist lens, connecting it with Dewey’s writing on experience, and with Jamesian pluralism. Follett also (...)
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  25. Some cross-cultural evidence on ethical reasoning.Judy Tsui & Carolyn Windsor - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 31 (2):143 - 150.
    This study draws on Kohlberg''s Cognitive Moral Development Theory and Hofstede''s Culture Theory to examine whether cultural differences are associated with variations in ethical reasoning. Ethical reasoning levels for auditors from Australia and China are expected to be different since auditors from China and Australia are also different in terms of the cultural dimensions of long term orientation, power distance, uncertainty avoidance and individualism. The Defining Issues Tests measuring ethical reasoning P scores were distributed to auditors from Australia and China (...)
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  26.  60
    Early understanding of the representational function of pictures.Judy S. DeLoache & Nancy M. Burns - 1994 - Cognition 52 (2):83-110.
  27.  17
    Reflecting on the Past and Future of Neuroethics: The Brain on a Pedestal.Judy Illes - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 14 (3):223-226.
    In October 2022, I had the privilege of joining Hank Greely on the opening panel of the annual International Neuroethics Society (INS) meeting in Montréal, Tiohtiá:ke, situated on the traditional t...
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  28.  92
    Jane Addams's Social Thought as a Model for a Pragmatist–Feminist Communitarianism.Judy D. Whipps - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (2):118-133.
    This paper argues that communitarian philosophy can be an important philosophic resource for feminist thinkers, particularly when considered in the light of Jane Addams's (1860-1935) feminist-pragmatism. Addams's communitarianism requires progressive change as well as a moral duty to seek out diverse voices. Contrary to some contemporary communitarians, Addams extends her concept of community to include interdependent global communities, such as the global community of women peace workers.
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  29.  10
    Bridging Philosophical and Practical Implications of Incidental Findings in Brain Research.Judy Illes & Vivian Nora Chin - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):298-304.
    In Phillip Kerr’s 1994 spellbinding novel A Philosophical Investigation, the medical test to which the protagonist refers is a functional brain scan based on positron emission tomography. It is used to run large studies of male and female brains and, following a lead suggested by animal studies, has been used to identify rare cases of human male subjects who lack the ventral medial nucleus. This nucleus, in the experiment, is hypothesized to inhibit the activity of the sexually dimorphic nucleus, a (...)
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  30.  26
    Chinese State-Owned Enterprises and Human Rights: The Importance of National and Intra-Organizational Pressures.Judy Muthuri & Glen Whelan - 2017 - Business and Society 56 (5):738-781.
    The growing global prominence of Chinese state-owned enterprises brings new dimensions to our understanding of multi-national corporations and human rights issues. This article constructs a three-level framework that enables the mapping of transnational, national, and intra-organizational human rights pressures, and uses this framework to identify and analyze the human rights that Chinese SOEs report concern with. The analysis provided suggests that while China’s most global SOEs are subject to transnational pressures to respect all human rights, such pressures appear outweighed by (...)
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  31. Cortical movement preparation before and after a conscious decision to move.Judy A. Trevena & Jeff G. Miller - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 10 (2):162-90.
    The idea that our conscious decisions determine our actions has been challenged by a report suggesting that the brain starts to prepare for a movement before the person concerned has consciously decided to move . Libet et al. claimed that their results show that our actions are not consciously initiated. The current article describes two experiments in which we attempted to replicate Libet et al.'s comparison of participants' movement-related brain activity with the reported times of their decisions to move and (...)
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  32.  68
    The ex-patients' movement: Where we've been and where we 're going'.Judi Chamberlin - 1990 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 11 (3):323-336.
    The mental patients' liberation movement, which started in the early 1970s, is a political movement comprised of people who have experienced psychiatric treatment and hospitalization. Its two main goals are developing self-help alternatives to medically-based psychiatric treatment and securing full citizenship rights for people labeled "mentally ill." The movement questions the medical model of "mental illness," and insists that people who have been labeled as "mentally ill" speak on their own behalf and not be represented by others who claim to (...)
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  33.  13
    East-West relational imaginaries: Classical Chinese gardens & self cultivation.Judy Bullington - 2024 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 56 (4):299-304.
  34.  29
    Bridging Philosophical and Practical Implications of Incidental Findings in Brain Research.Judy Illes & Vivian Nora Chin - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):298-304.
    Empirical studies and ethical-legal analyses have demonstrated that incidental fndings in the brain, most commonly vascular in origin, must be addressed in the current era of imaging research. The challenges, however, are substantial. The discovery and management of incidental fndings vary, at minimum, by institutional setting, professional background of investigators, and the inherent diferences between research and clinical protocols. In the context of human subjects protections, the challenges of disclosure of unexpected and potentially meaningful clinical information concern privacy and confdentiality, (...)
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  35.  10
    Morals, Materials, and Technoscience: The Energy Security Imaginary in the United States.Jessica M. Smith & Abraham S. D. Tidwell - 2015 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 40 (5):687-711.
    This article advances recent scholarship on energy security by arguing that the concept is best understood as a sociotechnical imaginary, a collective vision for a “good society” realized through technoscientific-oriented policies. Focusing on the 1952 Resources for Freedom report, the authors trace the genealogy of energy security, elucidating how it establishes a morality of efficiency that orients policy action under the guise of security toward the liberalizing of markets in resource states and a robust program of energy research and development (...)
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  36.  9
    Touching creatures, touching spirit: living in a sentient world: stories & essays.Judy Grahn - 2021 - Pasadena, CA: Red Hen Press.
    Touching Creatures, Touching Spirit illustrates with true stories that we live in an interactive, aware world in which the creatures around us in our neighborhoods know us and sometimes reach across to us, empathically and helpfully. Implications are that all beings live in a possible "common mind" from which our mass culture has disconnected, but which is only a heartbeat and some concentrated attention away. This mind encompasses microbial life and insects as well as creatures and extends to nonmaterial intelligence (...)
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  37.  5
    Re-Visioning Gender Relationships in the Organization.Judi Marshall - 1994 - Feminist Theology 3 (7):116-134.
    Callaway calls the process of re-appraisal of women's characteristics, social roles and culture, independent of male value systems...'re-vision', and identifies three ways it can describe women's current activities: 'Revision' in the standard sense of correcting or completing the record; then 're-vision' as looking again, a deliberate act to see through the stereotypes of our society as these are taken for granted in daily life and deeply embedded in academic tradition; and finally, 're-vision' in its extended sense as the imaginative power (...)
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  38. Empathy and the Other in Edith Stein and Simone de Beauvoir.Judy Miles - 1993 - Simone de Beauvoir Studies 10 (1):181-186.
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  39.  13
    The Structuralist Concept of Form.Judy Osowski - 1972 - Modern Schoolman 49 (4):349-355.
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  40.  20
    Jane Robinson in a conversation with Judith Parker.Judy Parker - 1997 - Nursing Inquiry 4 (1):66-68.
  41.  39
    In Pursuit of Philosophy and Best Practice—the Challenges of an Ethical Dilemma.Judy Richardson - 2014 - Ethics and Social Welfare 8 (4):399-407.
  42. California Polytechnic State University.Judy D. Saltzman - 1995 - In S. Radhakrishnan, Rama Rao Pappu & S. S. (eds.), New essays in the philosophy of Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan. Delhi: Sri Satguru Publications. pp. 6--405.
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  43.  66
    "Learn to earn": A pragmatist response to contemporary dialogues about industrial education.Judy Whipps - 2008 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 22 (1):pp. 59-67.
  44. Guest Editorial: Neuroethics—From Neurotechnology to Healthcare.Judy Illes & Eric Racine - 2007 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (2):125-128.
    In proportion to other serious illnesses, diseases of the brain and mind represent the greatest—and still increasing—public health burden that Western societies are facing. Consequently, scientists, governments, advocacy groups, and public health authorities are committed to research to tackle the causes and consequences of neurological and psychiatric diseases and to find cures for them. As neuroscience research progresses, ethicists and neuroscientists face numerous ethical challenges to the integration of frontier application of research—neurotechnology—with the delivery of high-quality healthcare. In this special (...)
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  45.  26
    Ethics and ecotourism.Judy Karwacki & Colin Boyd - 1995 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 4 (4):225–232.
    The world's largest industry is trying to become environmentally sensitive, but is it succeeding? Judy Karwacki, currently working towards an MBA, has an MA in Political Studies; she runs a travel agency in Saskatoon and has a very strong personal interest in ecotourism. Colin Boyd is Professor of Management at the College of Commerce, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Sask., Canada S7N 0W0, and an Associate Editor of this Review.
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  46.  47
    The Digital Architecture of Time Management.Judy Wajcman - 2019 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 44 (2):315-337.
    This article explores how the shift from print to electronic calendars materializes and exacerbates a distinctively quantitative, “spreadsheet” orientation to time. Drawing on interviews with engineers, I argue that calendaring systems are emblematic of a larger design rationale in Silicon Valley to mechanize human thought and action in order to make them more efficient and reliable. The belief that technology can be profitably employed to control and manage time has a long history and continues to animate contemporary sociotechnical imaginaries of (...)
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  47. A picture is worth 1000 words, but which 1000?Judy Illes, Eric Racine & Kirschen & P. Matthew - 2005 - In Neuroethics: Defining the Issues in Theory, Practice, and Policy. Oxford University Press UK.
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  48.  27
    Introduction.Judy Anderson - 2007 - Journal of Information Ethics 16 (1):13-15.
  49.  15
    Knowing the nurse practitioner: dominant discourses shaping our horizons.Judy Rashotte - 2005 - Nursing Philosophy 6 (1):51-62.
    The purpose of this paper is to examine the various discourses, particularly the dominant instrumental and economic discourses that have brought the phenomena of the nurse practitioner into being. It is proposed that NPs have been constituted as an object of nature and therefore understood metaphorically as a tool or instrument within the health care system to be used efficiently and effectively. Heidegger's philosophical analysis of the question concerning technology is used to argue that our current ways of knowing the (...)
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  50.  10
    The Struggle within the Struggle.Judy Kimble - 1981 - Feminist Review 8 (1):107-111.
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