6 found
Order:
  1.  52
    The Pen and the Sword: Writing and Conquest in Caesar's Gaul.Josiah Osgood - 2009 - Classical Antiquity 28 (2):328-358.
    Julius Caesar was remembered in later times for the unprecedented scale of his military activity. He was also remembered for writing copiously while on campaign. Focusing on the period of Rome's war with Gaul , this paper argues that the two activities were interrelated: writing helped to facilitate the Roman conquest of the Gallic peoples. It allowed Caesar to send messages within his own theater of operations, sometimes with distinctive advantages; it helped him stay in touch with Rome, from where (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  21
    Eloquence Under the Triumvirs.Josiah Osgood - 2006 - American Journal of Philology 127 (4):525-551.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  27
    Latin Literature and Performance (B.) Dufallo The Ghosts of the Past. Latin Literature, the Dead, and Rome's Transition to a Principate. Pp. Xii + 175. Columbus: The Ohio State University Press, 2007. Cased, US$49.95. ISBN: 978-0-8142-1044-. [REVIEW]Josiah Osgood - 2008 - The Classical Review 58 (2):475-.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  15
    The State of Speech: Rhetoric and Political Thought in Ancient Rome.Josiah Osgood - 2008 - American Journal of Philology 129 (4):601-605.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  9
    Caesar and Nicomedes.Josiah Osgood - 2008 - Classical Quarterly 58 (2):687-.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  2
    1. Cover Cover (Pp. C1-C4).Eleanor Cowan, Renaud Gagné, Patrick Glauthier, Julia Hejduk, Josiah Osgood & Christopher Welser - 2009 - Classical Antiquity 28 (2):279-327.
    The conflict between Jupiter and Juno in the Aeneid is commonly read as a battle between the forces of order and chaos. The present article argues that this schematization, though morally and aesthetically satisfying, fails to account for most of the data. Virgil's Jupiter is in fact concerned solely with power and adulation, despite persistent attempts by readers——and characters in the poem——to see him as benign. By systematically discussing every appearance of Jupiter in the poem, the article seeks to correct (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark