Results for 'Joshua D. Grill'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  18
    Deciding with Others: Interdependent Decision‐Making.Emily A. Largent, Justin Clapp, Jennifer S. Blumenthal-Barby, Christine Grady, Amy L. McGuire, Jason Karlawish, Joshua D. Grill, Shana D. Stites & Andrew Peterson - 2022 - Hastings Center Report 52 (6):23-32.
    Over the course of human life, health care decision‐making is often interdependent. In this article, we use “interdependence” to refer to patients’ engagement of nonclinicians—for example, family members or trusted friends—to reach health care decisions. Interdependence, we suggest, is common for patients in all stages of life, from early childhood to late adulthood. This view contrasts with the common bioethical assumption that medical decisions are either wholly independent or dependent and that independence or dependence is tightly coupled with a person's (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  47
    Proceedings of the Seventh Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank: Advances in Neurophysiology, Adaptive DBS, Virtual Reality, Neuroethics and Technology.Adolfo Ramirez-Zamora, James Giordano, Aysegul Gunduz, Jose Alcantara, Jackson N. Cagle, Stephanie Cernera, Parker Difuntorum, Robert S. Eisinger, Julieth Gomez, Sarah Long, Brandon Parks, Joshua K. Wong, Shannon Chiu, Bhavana Patel, Warren M. Grill, Harrison C. Walker, Simon J. Little, Ro’ee Gilron, Gerd Tinkhauser, Wesley Thevathasan, Nicholas C. Sinclair, Andres M. Lozano, Thomas Foltynie, Alfonso Fasano, Sameer A. Sheth, Katherine Scangos, Terence D. Sanger, Jonathan Miller, Audrey C. Brumback, Priya Rajasethupathy, Cameron McIntyre, Leslie Schlachter, Nanthia Suthana, Cynthia Kubu, Lauren R. Sankary, Karen Herrera-Ferrá, Steven Goetz, Binith Cheeran, G. Karl Steinke, Christopher Hess, Leonardo Almeida, Wissam Deeb, Kelly D. Foote & Okun Michael S. - 2020 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14.
  3.  22
    Beyond Point-and-Shoot Morality: Why Cognitive Science Matters for Ethics.Joshua D. Greene - 2015 - The Law and Ethics of Human Rights 9 (2):141-172.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  4. Finding faults: How moral dilemmas illuminate cognitive structure.Joshua D. Greene - unknown
    In philosophy, a debate can live forever. Nowhere is this more evident than in ethics, a field that is fueled by apparently intractable dilemmas. To promote the wellbeing of many, may we sacrifice the rights of a few? If our actions are predetermined, can we be held responsible for them? Should people be judged on their intentions alone, or also by the consequences of their behavior? Is failing to prevent someone’s death as blameworthy as actively causing it? For generations, questions (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  5.  41
    Beyond Point-and-Shoot Morality: Why Cognitive Science Matters for Ethics.Joshua D. Greene - 2015 - Law and Ethics of Human Rights 9 (2):141-172.
    Journal Name: The Law & Ethics of Human Rights Issue: Ahead of print.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  6.  37
    An appraisal theory of empathy and other vicarious emotional experiences.Joshua D. Wondra & Phoebe C. Ellsworth - 2015 - Psychological Review 122 (3):411-428.
  7. Beyond Point-and-Shoot Morality: Why Cognitive (Neuro)Science Matters for Ethics.Joshua D. Greene - 2014 - Ethics 124 (4):695-726.
    In this article I explain why cognitive science (including some neuroscience) matters for normative ethics. First, I describe the dual-process theory of moral judgment and briefly summarize the evidence supporting it. Next I describe related experimental research examining influences on intuitive moral judgment. I then describe two ways in which research along these lines can have implications for ethics. I argue that a deeper understanding of moral psychology favors certain forms of consequentialism over other classes of normative moral theory. I (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   134 citations  
  8.  52
    Toward an Ethics of Organizations.Joshua D. Margolis - 1999 - Business Ethics Quarterly 9 (4):619-638.
    Abstract:The organization is importantly different from both the nation-state and the individual and hence needs its own ethical models and theories, distinct from political and moral theory. To develop a case for organizational ethics, this paper advances arguments in three directions. First, it highlights the growing role of organizations and their distinctive attributes. Second, it illuminates the incongruities between organizations and moral and political philosophy. Third, it takes these incongruities, as well as organizations’ distinctive attributes, as a starting point for (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   71 citations  
  9. Reflection and Reasoning in Moral Judgment.Joshua D. Greene - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (1):163-177.
    While there is much evidence for the influence of automatic emotional responses on moral judgment, the roles of reflection and reasoning remain uncertain. In Experiment 1, we induced subjects to be more reflective by completing the Cognitive Reflection Test prior to responding to moral dilemmas. This manipulation increased utilitarian responding, as individuals who reflected more on the CRT made more utilitarian judgments. A follow-up study suggested that trait reflectiveness is also associated with increased utilitarian judgment. In Experiment 2, subjects considered (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   93 citations  
  10.  65
    Cognitive Load Selectively Interferes with Utilitarian Moral Judgment.Jonathan D. Cohen Joshua D. Greene, Sylvia A. Morelli, Kelly Lowenberg, Leigh E. Nystrom - 2008 - Cognition 107 (3):1144.
  11. Pushing moral buttons: The interaction between personal force and intention in moral judgment.Joshua D. Greene, Fiery A. Cushman, Lisa E. Stewart, Kelly Lowenberg, Leigh E. Nystrom & Jonathan D. Cohen - 2009 - Cognition 111 (3):364-371.
    In some cases people judge it morally acceptable to sacrifice one person’s life in order to save several other lives, while in other similar cases they make the opposite judgment. Researchers have identified two general factors that may explain this phenomenon at the stimulus level: (1) the agent’s intention (i.e. whether the harmful event is intended as a means or merely foreseen as a side-effect) and (2) whether the agent harms the victim in a manner that is relatively “direct” or (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   163 citations  
  12.  22
    Psychological Pragmatism and the Imperative of Aims: A New Approach for business Ethics.Joshua D. Margolis - 1998 - Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (3):409-430.
    Abstract:Psychological forces in play across individual, group, and organizational levels of analysis increase the likelihood that people in business organizations will engage in misconduct. Therefore, it is argued, we must turn our attention from dominant normative and empirical trends in business ethics, which revolve around boundaries and constraints, and instead concentrate on methods for promoting ethical behavior in practice, exploiting psychological forces conducive to ethical conduct. This calls for a better understanding of how organizations and their inhabitants function, and, in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  13. Cognitive load selectively interferes with utilitarian moral judgment.Joshua D. Greene, Sylvia A. Morelli, Kelly Lowenberg, Leigh E. Nystrom & Jonathan D. Cohen - 2008 - Cognition 107 (3):1144-1154.
    Traditional theories of moral development emphasize the role of controlled cognition in mature moral judgment, while a more recent trend emphasizes intuitive and emotional processes. Here we test a dual-process theory synthesizing these perspectives. More specifically, our theory associates utilitarian moral judgment (approving of harmful actions that maximize good consequences) with controlled cognitive processes and associates non-utilitarian moral judgment with automatic emotional responses. Consistent with this theory, we find that a cognitive load manipulation selectively interferes with utilitarian judgment. This interference (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   190 citations  
  14.  9
    A Metic was a Metic.Joshua D. Sosin - 2016 - História 65 (1):2-13.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  15.  74
    The rise of moral cognition.Joshua D. Greene - 2015 - Cognition 135 (C):39-42.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  16.  26
    “You Can Carry the Torch Now:” A Qualitative Analysis of Parents’ Experiences Caring for a Child with Trisomy 13 or 18.Joshua D. Arthur & Divya Gupta - 2017 - HEC Forum 29 (3):223-240.
    Trisomy 13 and 18 are rare chromosomal abnormalities associated with high morbidity and mortality. Improved survival rates and increased prevalence of aggressive medical intervention have resulted in families and physicians holding different perspectives regarding the appropriate management of children with T 13/18. Families were invited for open-ended interviews regarding their experiences with the medical care of a child with T 13/18 over the past 5 years. Seven of 33 invited families were surveyed; those who had spent more than 40 days (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  17.  25
    Psychological Pragmatism and the Imperative of Aims: A New Approach for business Ethics.Joshua D. Margolis - 1998 - Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (3):409-430.
    Abstract:Psychological forces in play across individual, group, and organizational levels of analysis increase the likelihood that people in business organizations will engage in misconduct. Therefore, it is argued, we must turn our attention from dominant normative and empirical trends in business ethics, which revolve around boundaries and constraints, and instead concentrate on methods for promoting ethical behavior in practice, exploiting psychological forces conducive to ethical conduct. This calls for a better understanding of how organizations and their inhabitants function, and, in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  18. The Necessity of Naturalness.Joshua D. K. Brown & Nathan Wildman - 2022 - Erkenntnis 89 (3):1017-1025.
    Are properties perfectly natural (or not) relative to worlds, or are they perfectly natural (or not) tout court? That is, could there be a property P that is instanti-ated at worlds w1 and w2, and is perfectly natural at w1 but not at w2? Here, we offer an original argument for the non-world-relativity of perfect naturalness. Along the way, we reply to a prima facie compelling argument for the contin-gency of perfect naturalness, based upon the connection between natural prop-erties and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  19.  84
    The rat-a-gorical imperative: Moral intuition and the limits of affective learning.Joshua D. Greene - 2017 - Cognition 167 (C):66-77.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  20. An Examination of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory’s Nomological Network: A Meta-Analytic Review.Joshua D. Miller & Donald R. Lynam - 2012 - Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment 3 (3):305–326.
    Since its publication, the Psychopathic Personality Inventory and its revision (Lilien- feld & Andrews, 1996; Lilienfeld & Widows, 2005) have become increasingly popular such that it is now among the most frequently used self-report inventories for the assessment of psychopathy. The current meta-analysis examined the relations between the two PPI factors (factor 1: Fearless Dominance; factor 2: Self-Centered Impulsivity), as well as their relations with other validated measures of psychopathy, internalizing and externalizing forms of psychopathology, general personality traits, and antisocial (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  21.  12
    Mimicry of partially occluded emotional faces: do we mimic what we see or what we know?Joshua D. Davis, Seana Coulson, Christophe Blaison, Ursula Hess & Piotr Winkielman - 2022 - Cognition and Emotion 36 (8):1555-1575.
    Facial electromyography (EMG) was used to investigate patterns of facial mimicry in response to partial facial expressions in two contexts that differ in how naturalistic and socially significant the faces are. Experiment 1 presented participants with either the upper- or lower-half of facial expressions and used a forced-choice emotion categorisation task. This task emphasises cognition at the expense of ecological and social validity. Experiment 2 presented whole heads and expressions were occluded by clothing. Additionally, the emotion recognition task is more (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22.  85
    Dual-process moral judgment beyond fast and slow.Joshua D. Greene - 2023 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 46:e123.
    De Neys makes a compelling case that the sacrificial moral dilemmas do not elicit competing “fast and slow” processes. But are there even two processes? Or just two intuitions? There remains strong evidence, most notably from lesion studies, that sacrificial dilemmas engage distinct cognitive processes generating conflicting emotional and rational responses. The dual-process theory gets much right, but needs revision.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  42
    Strange Legacies of the Terror: Hegel, the French Revolution, and the Khmer Rouge Purges.Joshua D. Goldstein & Maureen S. Hiebert - 2016 - The European Legacy 21 (2):145-167.
    Explanations of the violence perpetrated by the Khmer Rouge between 1975 and 1979 in Cambodia often conflate two events: the far-ranging and self-destructive violence within the revolutionary Party, which led to the deaths of tens of thousands of cadres, and the larger genocidal destruction of so-called “counter-revolutionary” classes and ethnic minorities. The exterminationist violence inflicted within the Khmer Rouge organization itself is perplexing, for its shape and sequence cannot be explained by theories of mass violence in the current literatures on (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Suppose Yalcin is wrong about epistemic modals.Joshua D. Crabill - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 162 (3):625-635.
    In “Epistemic Modals,” Seth Yalcin argues that what explains the deficiency of sentences containing epistemic modals of the form ‘p and it might be that not-p’ is that sentences of this sort are strictly contradictory, and thus are not instances of a Moore-paradox as has been previous suggested. Benjamin Schnieder, however, argues in his Yalcin’s explanation of these sentences’ deficiency turns out to be insufficiently general, as it cannot account for less complex but still defective sentences, such as ‘Suppose it (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  25.  20
    Regulating surplus: charity and the legal geographies of food waste enclosure.Joshua D. Lohnes - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (2):351-363.
    Food charity in the United States has grown into a critical appendage of agro-food supply chains. In 2016, 4.5 billion pounds of food waste was diverted through a network of 200 regional food banks, a fivefold increase in just 20 years. Recent global trade disruptions and the COVID-19 pandemic have further reinforced this trend. Economic geographers studying charitable food networks argue that its infrastructure and moral substructure serve to revalue food waste and surplus labor in the capitalist food system. The (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  26.  32
    A Place to Be Free: Writing Your Own Story in Westworld.Joshua D. Crabill - 2018 - In James South & Kimberly Engels (eds.), Westworld and Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 114–124.
    German philosopher Immanuel Kant employs the story of Eve in the Garden of Eden as a way to think about what the development of autonomy in human beings must have involved. In the beginning, our ancestors invariably listened to their instincts, which would have seemed to them, as Kant describes it, like the “voice of God which all animals must obey”. Regardless of whether it has any basis in historical reality, that moment represents for Kant the birth of human autonomy: (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  85
    Solving the Trolley Problem.Joshua D. Greene - 2016 - In Wesley Buckwalter & Justin Sytsma (eds.), Blackwell Companion to Experimental Philosophy. Malden, MA: Blackwell. pp. 173–189.
    The Trolley Problem arises from a set of moral dilemmas, most of which involve tradeoffs between causing one death and preventing several more deaths. The normative and descriptive Trolley Problems are closely related. The normative Trolley Problem begins with the assumption that authors' natural responses to these cases are generally, if not uniformly, correct. Thus, any attempt to solve the normative Trolley Problem begins with an attempt to solve the descriptive problem, to identify the features of actions that elicit their (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  28.  10
    Death on a Road.Joshua D. Sosin - 2016 - História 65 (2):155-169.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  23
    Circularity in Setiya’s Knowing Right from Wrong.Joshua D. McBee - 2018 - Social Theory and Practice 44 (3):349-375.
    Recently, Kieran Setiya suggested that we might respond to evolutionary debunking arguments by arguing that, even if we cannot explain our reliability in ethics, we might justify believing ourselves reliable using a track record argument. Not surprisingly, several critics have claimed that this response is circular. I consider two senses in which they might be right, concluding that, though Setiya’s argument does not beg the question, it is epistemically circular. Perhaps surprisingly, its epistemic circularity need not prevent Setiya’s argument from (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  30. Of miracles and metaphysics: A pentecostal‐charismatic and process‐relational dialogue.Joshua D. Reichard - 2013 - Zygon 48 (2):274-293.
    This article is comprised of a dialogue between Pentecostal-Charismatic and Process-Relational theologies on the perennial issue of miracles. The language of supernaturalism, widely employed by Pentecostal-Charismatic theologians, is contrasted with the metaphysical naturalism of Process-Relational theology; it is proposed that a philosophically and scientifically sensitive theology of miracles is possible through a synthesis of both traditions. Themes such as nonmaterialism over materialism, spiritual experience, and prayer for healing miracles are explored. A theology of miracles, mutually informed by both Pentecostal-Charismatic and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31.  12
    Sacred language, sacred world: the unity of scriptural and philosophical hermeneutics.Joshua D. Broggi - 2016 - New York: Bloomsbury T&T Clark, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing Plc.
    Heidegger and Gadamer are typically read by different theologians. Heidegger tends to be read by philosophical theologians examining his contribution to matters of doubt, existential finitude, and atheism. Gadamer tends to be read by those with an interest in interpreting the Bible, especially by those with more confessional or epistemically optimistic sensibilities. In both cases, Heidegger and Gadamer have well-established associations with specific theological positions. Joshua Broggi challenges this arrangement by re-reading the primary texts as theological resources; he defends (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Ido Geiger, The Founding Act of Modern Ethical Life: Hegel's Critique of Kant's Moral and Political Philosophy Reviewed by.Joshua D. Goldstein - 2008 - Philosophy in Review 28 (3):194-196.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Hegel's Idea of the Good Life. From Virtue to Freedom. Early Writings and Mature Political Philosophy.Joshua D. Goldstein - 2007 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 69 (4):774-775.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  34.  78
    Chemical atomism: a case study in confirmation and ontology.Joshua D. K. Brown - 2015 - Synthese 192 (2):453-485.
    Quine, taking the molecular constitution of matter as a paradigmatic example, offers an account of the relation between theory confirmation and ontology. Elsewhere, he deploys a similar ontological methodology to argue for the existence of mathematical objects. Penelope Maddy considers the atomic/molecular theory in more historical detail. She argues that the actual ontological practices of science display a positivistic demand for “direct observation,” and that fulfillment of this demand allows us to distinguish molecules and other physical objects from mathematical abstracta. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35. Emotion and Morality: A Tasting Menu.Joshua D. Greene - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (3):227-229.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  36.  6
    Unwelcome Dedications: Public Law and Private Religion in Hellenistic Laodicea by the Sea.Joshua D. Sosin - 2005 - Classical Quarterly 55 (01):130-139.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37.  44
    Emotion and Morality: A Tasting Menu.Joshua D. Greene - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (3):227-229.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  38. How moral dilemmas illuminate cognitive structure.Joshua D. Greene - unknown
    In philosophy, a debate can live forever. Nowhere is this more evident than in ethics, a field that is fueled by apparently intractable dilemmas. To promote the wellbeing of many, may we sacrifice the rights of a few? If our actions are predetermined, can we be held responsible for them? Should people be judged on their intentions alone, or also by the consequences of their behavior? Is failing to prevent someone’s death as blameworthy as actively causing it? For generations, questions (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  14
    “Pentecost, Process, and Power.Joshua D. Reichard - 2010 - Process Studies 39 (2):382-383.
  40.  81
    Human Nature and Business Ethics.Joshua D. Margolis - 2004 - The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics 4:129-133.
    While there seems to be little controversy about whether there is a biological or evolutionary basis for human morality, in business and other endeavors, there is considerable controversy about the nature of this basis and the proper populations in which to study this foundation. Moreover, I suggest, the most fundamental element of this basis may be the tendency of humans and other species to experience the world in evaluative terms.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41.  6
    “Those who Live Apart” were Mercenaries.Joshua D. Sosin - 2015 - História 64 (4):413-418.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  5
    Rooted.Joshua D. Hill - 2014 - Listening 49 (2):112-112.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  12
    Human Nature and Business Ethics.Joshua D. Margolis - 2004 - The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics 4:129-133.
    While there seems to be little controversy about whether there is a biological or evolutionary basis for human morality, in business and other endeavors, there is considerable controversy about the nature of this basis and the proper populations in which to study this foundation. Moreover, I suggest, the most fundamental element of this basis may be the tendency of humans and other species to experience the world in evaluative terms.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  43
    Responsibility in Organizational Context.Joshua D. Margolis - 2001 - Business Ethics Quarterly 11 (3):431-454.
    Abstract:Why does it matter that every negative thought you have had about car salespeople, they have likely had about you? The answer to this question opens up the distinctive challenges, and opportunities, facing business ethics. Those challenges and opportunities emerge from the significant bearing organizational reality has upon individuals’ conduct. As we consider how to assign responsibility for misconduct; how to provide guidance to organizational actors about what they ought to do; and how to develop responsive ethical theory, we need (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  45.  13
    From Semantics to Metaphysics.Joshua D. Brown - 2009 - Dissertation, University of Michigan
    It is widely assumed in philosophy that there is a tight connection between semantics and metaphysics. Semantic theories about the meanings of natural language terms and phrases are taken to provide evidence for and against various metaphysical theses about the nature of non-linguistic parts of the world. Call this view the widespread thesis. I argue that the widespread thesis is mistaken: semantic theories do not generally have robust metaphysical consequences. I contend that the best arguments for the widespread thesis turn (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46. Natural Objects.Joshua D. K. Brown - 2016 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 2 (2):254-271.
    This paper introduces a framework for thinking about ontological questions—in particular, the Special Composition Question—and shows how the framework might help support something like an account of restricted composition. The framework takes the form of an account of natural objects, in analogy with David Lewis’s account of natural properties. Objects, like properties, come in various metaphysical grades, from the fundamental, fully objective, perfectly natural objects to the nomologically otiose, maximally gerrymandered, perfectly non-natural objects. The perfectly natural objects, I argue, are (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  47. A New Semantics for Vagueness.Joshua D. K. Brown & James W. Garson - 2017 - Erkenntnis 82 (1):65-85.
    Intuitively, vagueness involves some sort of indeterminacy: if Plato is a borderline case of baldness, then there is no fact of the matter about whether or not he’s bald—he’s neither bald nor not bald. The leading formal treatments of such indeterminacy—three valued logic, supervaluationism, etc.—either fail to validate the classical theorems, or require that various classically valid inference rules be restricted. Here we show how a fully classical, yet indeterminist account of vagueness can be given within natural semantics, an alternative (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  48. and Andrew L. Molinsky.Joshua D. Margolis & Adam M. Grant - 2007 - In Ashly Pinnington, Rob Macklin & Tom Campbell (eds.), Human Resource Management: Ethics and Employment. Oxford University Press. pp. 237.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  37
    Debating Climate Ethics by Stephen M. Gardiner and David A. Weisbach.Joshua D. McBee - 2018 - Ethics and the Environment 23 (1):71-77.
    Stephen Gardiner and David Weisbach's recent Debating Climate Ethics takes up an urgent and important question: is ethics relevant to climate policy? Or rather, the book takes up several, closely related versions of that question we do well to distinguish clearly: 1 Are ethical considerations relevant to climate policy? 2 Do ethical theories philosophers defend have implications regarding climate policy? 3 Does climate ethics provide policy analysts any useful guidance? Or, in other words, should climate policy analysts pay any attention (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  42
    The Importance of Risk Tolerance in Maternal Autonomy.Joshua D. Kapfhamer, Seema Menon & Ryan Spellecy - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (7):53 - 54.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 7, Page 53-54, July 2012.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000