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Jonathan Kahn [12]Jonathan D. Kahn [1]
  1.  8
    Science Is Complex—So Is Race.Jonathan Kahn - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (9):56-58.
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  2.  25
    Flaws in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Rationale for Supporting the Development and Approval of BiDil as a Treatment for Heart Failure Only in Black Patients.George T. H. Ellison, Jay S. Kaufman, Rosemary F. Head, Paul A. Martin & Jonathan D. Kahn - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (3):449-457.
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's rationale for supporting the development and approval of BiDil for heart failure specifically in black patients was based on under-powered, post hoc subgroup analyses of two relatively old trials , which were further complicated by substantial covariate imbalances between racial groups. Indeed, the only statistically significant difference observed between black and white patients was found without any adjustment for potential confounders in samples that were unlikely to have been adequately randomized. Meanwhile, because the accepted (...)
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  3. Patenting Race in a Genomic Age.Jonathan Kahn - 2008 - Genomics, Society and Policy 4 (3):46-63.
  4.  23
    Race, Pharmacogenomics, and Marketing: Putting BiDil in Context.Jonathan Kahn - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (5):W1-W5.
    This article endeavors to place into context recent developments surrounding the United States Food and Drug Administration recent approval of BiDil? (isosorbide dinitrate/hydralazine hydrochloride) (NitroMed, Inc., Lexington, MA) as the first ever race-specific drug?in this case to treat heart failure in African Americans. It focuses in particular on both commercial incentives and statistical manipulation of medical data as framing the drive to bring BiDil to market as a race-specific drug. In current discourse about pharmacogenomics, targeting a racial audience is perceived (...)
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  5.  39
    Getting the Numbers Right: Statistical Mischief and Racial Profiling in Heart Failure Research.Jonathan Kahn - 2003 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 46 (4):473-483.
  6.  6
    Review of Lundy Braun, Breathing Race Into the Machine: The Surprising Career of the Spirometer From Plantation to Genetics. [REVIEW]Jonathan Kahn - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (2):5-6.
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  7.  19
    The Two (Institutional) Cultures A Consideration of Structural Barriers to Interdisciplinarity.Jonathan Kahn - 2011 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (3):399-408.
    The famous 1959 Two Cultures essay by C. P. Snow has become a foil for decades of discussions over the relation between science and the humanities. The problem of the “two cultures” is often framed in terms of how the particular epistemological claims or general intellectual orientations of particular individuals on either side of this purported divide obstruct interdisciplinary dialogue or cooperation. This formulation, however, is ultimately unsatisfying, because often it focuses narrowly on the intentions and arguments of individuals, without (...)
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  8. Perspective: "Ethnic Drugs".Jonathan Kahn - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (1).
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  9.  50
    "Ethnic Drugs&Quot.Jonathan Kahn - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (1):c3-c3.
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  10.  17
    The Troubling Persistence of Race in Pharmacogenomics.Jonathan Kahn - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):873-885.
    This article is concerned about what may be happening to race and medicine in the “meantime” between today's clinical realities and the promised land of pharmacogenomics where the need for using race in medicine is supposed to fade away. It argues that previous debates over the use of race in medicine are being side-stepped as race is being reconfigured from a “crude surrogate” for genetic variation into a purportedly viable placeholder for variable drug response — to be used here and (...)
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  11.  21
    Ethnic Drugs.Jonathan Kahn - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (1):c3-c3.
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  12.  5
    The Troubling Persistence of Race in Pharmacogenomics.Jonathan Kahn - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):873-885.
    In 1878, Friedrich Engels famously wrote that on the road to realizing the communist utopia, “the state is not abolished, it withers away.” In a similar manner, biomedical researchers telling us that come the promised land of individualized genomic medicine, the need for using race will also “wither away” in the face of scientific progress. Such millennial hopes are, no doubt, sincere, but they enable the continued casual proliferation of racial categories throughout biomedical research, product development, marketing, and clinical practice. (...)
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  13.  28
    Enslaving the Image: The Origins of the Tort of Appropriation of Identity Reconsidered: Jonathan Kahn.Jonathan Kahn - 1996 - Legal Theory 2 (4):301-324.
    There is no escaping the fact that law shapes identity. Laws tells us who we are and where we stand in society. While sometimes benign, such classification can also be a devastatingly powerful instrument of ostracism and subjugation. Legally enforced racial segregation sent a cold and harsh message about what the dominant society thought it meant to be black. The recent backlash against affirmative action resurrects degrading stereotypes and sends old messages wrapped in new code words about racial identity. “English-only” (...)
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