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  1.  86
    Religion and Attitudes to Corporate Social Responsibility in a Large Cross-Country Sample.S. Brammer, Geoffrey Williams & John Zinkin - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 71 (3):229-243.
    This paper explores the relationship between religious denomination and individual attitudes to Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) within the context of a large sample of over 17,000 individuals drawn from 20 countries. We address two general questions: do members of religious denominations have different attitudes concerning CSR than people of no denomination? And: do members of different religions have different attitudes to CSR that conform to general priors about the teachings of different religions? Our evidence suggests that, broadly, religious individuals do (...)
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  2.  99
    Islam and CSR: A Study of the Compatibility Between the Tenets of Islam and the UN Global Compact.Geoffrey Williams & John Zinkin - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (4):519-533.
    This paper looks at whether the tenets of Islam are consistent with the 'Ten Principles' of responsible business outlined in the UN Global Compact. The paper concludes that with the possible exception of Islam's focus on personal responsibility and the non-recognition of the corporation as a legal person, which could undermine the concept of corporate responsibility, there is no divergence between the tenets of the religion and the principles of the UN Global Compact. Indeed, Islam often goes further and has (...)
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  3.  48
    The effect of culture on consumers' willingness to punish irresponsible corporate behaviour: Applying hofstede's typology to the punishment aspect of corporate social responsibility.Geoffrey Williams & John Zinkin - 2008 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 17 (2):210–226.
    This paper explores the relationship between attitudes to corporate social responsibility (CSR) and the cultural dimensions of business activity identified by Hofstede & Hofstede using a sample of nearly 90,000 stakeholders drawn from 28 countries. We develop five general propositions relating attitudes to CSR to aspects of culture. We show that the propensity of consumers to punish firms for bad behaviour varies in ways that appear to relate closely to the cultural characteristics identified by Hofstede. Furthermore, this variation appears to (...)
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  4.  18
    The effect of culture on consumers' willingness to punish irresponsible corporate behaviour: applying Hofstede's typology to the punishment aspect of corporate social responsibility.Geoffrey Williams & John Zinkin - 2008 - Business Ethics 17 (2):210-226.
    This paper explores the relationship between attitudes to corporate social responsibility (CSR) and the cultural dimensions of business activity identified by Hofstede & Hofstede using a sample of nearly 90,000 stakeholders drawn from 28 countries. We develop five general propositions relating attitudes to CSR to aspects of culture. We show that the propensity of consumers to punish firms for bad behaviour varies in ways that appear to relate closely to the cultural characteristics identified by Hofstede. Furthermore, this variation appears to (...)
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  5.  1
    The challenge of leading an ethical and successful organization.John Zinkin - 2023 - Boston: De Gruyter. Edited by Chris Bennett.
    Being both ethical and successful is challenging. The rewards of unethical behavior are often greater than the price paid for misbehavior. This book explains why leaders, seeking to run ethical and successful organizations, cannot depend only on the law and their organizations to make moral business decisions. The authors explore why making ethical business decisions is harder than is generally understood, and explores the difficulties leaders face as a result of differences in context, circumstances, and other challenges to ethical behavior, (...)
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