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  1.  2
    War of the Worlds: What About Peace?Bruno Latour & John Tresch - 2002 - Prickly Paradigm.
    Bruno Latour is best known for his work in the cultural study of science. In this pamphlet he turns his attention to another worthy pursuit: the project of peace. As one might expect, Latour gives us a radically different picture of this project than Kant or the philosophes, asserting that the West has been in a constant state of war both with other cultures and its own—although unwittingly so. Read through the lens of his trademark take on "the modern," his (...)
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  2.  20
    “Matter No More”: Edgar Allan Poe and the Paradoxes of Materialism.John Tresch - 2016 - Critical Inquiry 42 (4):865-898.
  3.  12
    In a Solitary Place: Raymond Roussel’s Brain and the French Cult of Unreason.John Tresch - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 35 (2):307-332.
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  4.  3
    Technological World‐Pictures.John Tresch - 2007 - Isis 98 (1):84-99.
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  5.  5
    Sickness and Sweetness and Power.John Tresch - 2020 - Isis 111 (4):800-804.
  6.  17
    The Order of the Prophets: Series in Early French Social Science and Socialism.John Tresch - 2010 - History of Science 48 (3-4):3-4.
  7.  47
    In a Solitary Place: Raymond Roussel's Brain and the French Cult of Unreason.John Tresch - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 35 (2):307-332.
    French surrealist author Raymond Roussel’s novel Locus solus depicted a brain-in-a-vat apparatus in which the head of the revolutionary orator Georges Danton was reanimated and made to speak. This scene of mechanically-produced language echoes Roussel’s own method of quasi-mechanical literary production as presented in How I wrote certain of my books. Roussel’s work participates in a wider fascination in modern French thought with the fragile connection, or violent disjuncture, between the body and mind. This paper discusses a number of instances (...)
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  8.  4
    The Compositor's Reversal: Typography, Science, and Creation in Poe's Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym.John Tresch - 2018 - History and Theory 57 (4):8-31.
  9.  44
    On Going Native: Thomas Kuhn and Anthropological Method.John Tresch - 2001 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 31 (3):302-322.
    In this article, Thomas Kuhn’s theory of incommensurable paradigms learned through exemplars is discussed as a theory of acculturation akin to those of cultural anthropology. Yet his hermeneutic approach results in a classic problem, referred to here as the paradox of objective relativism. A solution, at least for observers of contemporary cultures, is drawn from Kuhn’s own writings: a fieldwork method of “going native.” It is argued that Kuhn’s views are as important a corrective for anthropologists studying native systems of (...)
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  10.  6
    Robert Mitchell. Experimental Life: Vitalism in Romantic Science and Literature. Viii + 309 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013. $55. [REVIEW]John Tresch - 2015 - Isis 106 (1):196-197.
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  11.  27
    The Daguerreotype’s First Frame: François Arago’s Moral Economy of Instruments.John Tresch - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (2):445-476.
    This paper examines the meanings of the daguerreotype for the astronomer and physicist who introduced it to the world, François Arago. The regime of knowledge production which held sway at the birth of photography implied an alternative view of the moral and political implications of machines from that usually suggested by discussions of ‘mechanization’. Instead of celebrating detachment, instantaneity, transparency and abstraction, Arago understood instruments and human citizens as dynamic mediators which necessarily modify the forces they transmit. His moral economy (...)
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