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  1.  23
    Spirituality and nursing: a reductionist approach.John Paley - 2008 - Nursing Philosophy 9 (1):3-18.
    The vast majority of contributions to the literature on spirituality in nursing make extravagant claims about transcendence, eternity, the numinous, higher powers, higher levels of existence, invisible forces, cosmic unity, the essence of humanity, or other supernatural concepts. Typically, these assertions are made without the support of argument or evidence; and, as a consequence, alternative ways of theorizing ‘spirituality’ have been closed off, while the lack of consistent scholarship has turned the topic into a metaphysical backwater. In this paper, I (...)
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  2.  31
    Cognition and the compassion deficit: the social psychology of helping behaviour in nursing.John Paley - 2014 - Nursing Philosophy 15 (4):274-287.
    This paper discusses compassion failure and compassion deficits in health care, using two major reports by Robert Francis in the UK as a point of reference. Francis enquired into events at the Mid Staffordshire Hospital between 2005 and 2009, events that unequivocally warrant the description ‘appalling care’. These events prompted an intense national debate, along with proposals for significant changes in the regulation of nursing and nurse education. The circumstances are specific to the UK, but the issues are international.I suggest (...)
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  3.  72
    Virtues of autonomy: the Kantian ethics of care.John Paley - 2002 - Nursing Philosophy 3 (2):133-143.
    The ethics of care, adopted in much of the nursing literature, is usually framed in opposition to the Kantian ethics of principle. Irrespective of whether the ethics of care is grounded in gender, as with Gilligan and Noddings, or inscribed on Heidegger's ontology, as with Benner, Kant remains the philosophical adversary, honouring reason rather than emotion, universality rather than context, and individual autonomy rather than interdependence. During the past decade, however, a great deal of Kantian scholarship – including feminist scholarship (...)
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  4.  21
    Phenomenology as rhetoric.John Paley - 2005 - Nursing Inquiry 12 (2):106-116.
    Phenomenology as rhetoric The literature on ‘nursing phenomenology’ is driven by a range of ontological and epistemological considerations, intended to distance it from conventionally scientific approaches. However, this paper examines a series of discrepancies between phenomenological rhetoric and phenomenological practice. The rhetoric celebrates perceptions and experience; but the concluding moment of a research report almost always makes implicit claims about reality. The rhetoric insists on uniquely personal meanings; but the practice offers blank, anonymous abstractions. The rhetoric invites us to believe (...)
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  5.  42
    Heidegger and the ethics of care.John Paley - 2000 - Nursing Philosophy 1 (1):64-75.
    The claim that, in some nontrivial sense, nursing can be identified with caring has prompted a search for the philosophical foundations of care in the nursing literature. Although the ethics of care was initially associated with Gilligan's ‘different voice’, there has more recently been an attempt – led principally by Benner – to displace the gender perspective with a Heideggerian one, even if Kant is the figure to whom both Gilligan and Benner appear most irretrievably opposed. This paper represents the (...)
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  6.  48
    Error and objectivity: cognitive illusions and qualitative research.John Paley - 2005 - Nursing Philosophy 6 (3):196-209.
    Psychological research has shown that cognitive illusions, of which visual illusions are just a special case, are systematic and pervasive, raising epistemological questions about how error in all forms of research can be identified and eliminated. The quantitative sciences make use of statistical techniques for this purpose, but it is not clear what the qualitative equivalent is, particularly in view of widespread scepticism about validity and objectivity. I argue that, in the light of cognitive psychology, the ‘error question’ cannot be (...)
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  7.  10
    Evidence and expertise.John Paley - 2006 - Nursing Inquiry 13 (2):82-93.
    This paper evaluates attempts to defend established concepts of expertise and clinical judgement against the incursions of evidence‐based practice. Two related arguments are considered. The first suggests that standard accounts of evidence‐based practice imply an overly narrow view of ‘evidence’, and that a more inclusive concept, incorporating ‘patterns of knowing’ not recognised by the familiar evidence hierarchies, should be adopted. The second suggests that statistical generalisations cannot be applied non‐problematically to individual patients in specific contexts, and points out that this (...)
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  8. Nursing theorists and their work, sixth edition.John Paley - 2006 - Nursing Philosophy 7 (4):275–280.
  9.  22
    Why the cognitive science of religion cannot rescue ‘spiritual care’.John Paley - 2015 - Nursing Philosophy 16 (4):213-225.
    Peter Kevern believes that the cognitive science of religion (CSR) provides a justification for the idea of spiritual care in the health services. In this paper, I suggest that he is mistaken on two counts. First, CSR does not entail the conclusions Kevern wants to draw. His treatment of it consists largely of nonsequiturs. I show this by presenting an account of CSR, and then explaining why Kevern's reasons for thinking it rescues ‘spirituality’ discourse do not work. Second, the debate (...)
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  10.  28
    The fictionalist paradigm.John Paley - 2011 - Nursing Philosophy 12 (1):53-66.
    The fictionalist paradigm is introduced, and differentiated from other paradigms, using the Lincoln & Guba template. Following an initial overview, the axioms of fictionalism are delineated by reference to standard metaphysical categories: the nature of reality, the relationship between knower and known, the possibility of generalization, the possibility of causal linkages, and the role of values in inquiry. Although a paradigm's ‘basic beliefs’ are arbitrary and can be assumed for any reason, in this paper the fictionalist axioms are supported with (...)
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  11.  32
    Meaning, lived experience, empathy and boredom: Max van Manen on phenomenology and Heidegger.John Paley - 2018 - Nursing Philosophy 19 (3):e12211.
    Phenomenology as Qualitative Research: A Critical Analysis of Meaning Attribution has attracted the attention of Max van Manen, who has published a highly critical review article. Anyone reading this article, but unfamiliar with the book, will get a distorted view of what it is about, whom it is addressed to, what it tries to achieve, and how it goes about presenting its arguments. Not mildly distorted, in need of the odd correction here and there, but systematically misrepresented. One problem is (...)
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  12.  11
    Philosophy and palliative care.John Paley - 2008 - Nursing Philosophy 9 (2):75–76.
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  13.  63
    Nursing knowledge: Science, practice, and philosophy.John Paley - 2010 - Nursing Philosophy 11 (3):216-219.
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  14.  64
    Spirituality and reductionism: Three replies.John Paley - 2010 - Nursing Philosophy 11 (3):178-190.
    Several authors have commented on my reductionist account of spirituality in nursing, describing it variously as naïve, disrespectful, demeaning, paternalistic, arrogant, reifying, indicative of a closed mind, akin to positivism, a procrustean bed, a perpetuation of fraud, a matter of faith, an attempt to secure ideological power, and a perspective that puritanically forbids interesting philosophical topics. In responding to this list of felonies and misdemeanours, I try to justify my excesses by arguing that the critics have not really understood what (...)
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  15.  13
    Against meaning.John Paley - 2000 - Nursing Philosophy 1 (2):109-120.
    The idea of meaning plays, together with the notion of caring, a pivotal role in recent nursing theory, informing its approach to philosophy, research and practice. Unlike caring, however, it has received relatively little analytical attention – a fact that is surprising in view of the scepticism about meaning that is characteristic of much contemporary philosophy and social theory. This paper reviews the philosophical literature on meaning, highlighting sceptical currents in the Wittgensteinian corpus, neo‐behaviourism and poststructuralism. It also considers a (...)
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  16.  9
    The Moral Psychology Handbook.John Paley - 2010 - Nursing Philosophy 13 (1):80-83.
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  17.  29
    Phenomenology and qualitative research: Amedeo Giorgi's hermetic epistemology.John Paley - 2018 - Nursing Philosophy 19 (3):e12212.
    Amedeo Giorgi has published a review article devoted to Phenomenology as Qualitative Research: A Critical Analysis of Meaning Attribution. However, anyone reading this article, but unfamiliar with the book, will get a distorted view of what it is about, whom it is addressed to, what it seeks to achieve and how it goes about presenting its arguments. Not mildly distorted, in need of the odd correction here and there, but systematically misrepresented. The article is a study in misreading. Giorgi misreads (...)
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  18.  30
    The cartesian melodrama in nursing.John Paley - 2002 - Nursing Philosophy 3 (3):189–192.
  19.  59
    Narrative vigilance: the analysis of stories in health care.John Paley & Gail Eva - 2005 - Nursing Philosophy 6 (2):83-97.
    The idea of narrative has been widely discussed in the recent health care literature, including nursing, and has been portrayed as a resource for both clinical work and research studies. However, the use of the term 'narrative' is inconsistent, and various assumptions are made about the nature (and functions) of narrative: narrative as a naive account of events; narrative as the source of 'subjective truth'; narrative as intrinsically fictional; and narrative as a mode of explanation. All these assumptions have left (...)
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  20.  32
    Postmodern Nursing and Beyond.John Paley - 2000 - Nursing Philosophy 1 (1):82-83.
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  21.  23
    Complex adaptive systems and nursing.John Paley - 2007 - Nursing Inquiry 14 (3):233-242.
    Complex adaptive systems and nursingThere have been numerous references to complexity theory and complex systems in the recent healthcare literature, including nursing. However, exaggerated claims have (in my view) been made about how they can be applied to health service delivery, and there is a widespread tendency to misunderstand some of the concepts associated with complexity thinking (usually justified by describing the misconception as a metaphor). These conceptscanbe extended to systems and structures in healthcare organisations but, at this stage in (...)
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  22.  27
    Deconstructing evidence-based practice.John Paley - 2005 - Nursing Philosophy 6 (2):150–152.
  23.  20
    Gadow's Romanticism: science, poetry and embodiment in postmodern nursing.John Paley - 2004 - Nursing Philosophy 5 (2):112-126.
    Sally Gadow's work is a sophisticated version of a familiar line of thought in nursing. She creates a chain of distinctions which is intended to differentiate cultural narratives, and particularly the ‘science narrative’, from imaginative narratives, especially poetry. Cultural narratives regulate and restrict; imaginative narratives are creative, liberating and potentially transcendent. These ideological effects are (supposedly) achieved through different structures of language. Scientific language, for example, is abstract and literal, while poetry is sensuous and metaphorical. In this paper, I argue (...)
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  24.  28
    I am a strange loop.John Paley - 2009 - Nursing Philosophy 10 (4):297-299.
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  25.  27
    Kant and the ethics of humility: A story of dependence, corruption and virtue.John Paley - 2007 - Nursing Philosophy 8 (2):139–141.
  26.  38
    Qualitative interviewing as measurement.John Paley - 2010 - Nursing Philosophy 11 (2):112-126.
    The attribution of beliefs and other propositional attitudes is best understood as a form of measurement, however counter-intuitive this may seem. Measurement theory does not require that the thing measured should be a magnitude, or that the calibration of the measuring instrument should be numerical. It only requires a homomorphism between the represented domain and the representing domain. On this basis, maps measure parts of the world, usually geographical locations, and 'belief' statements measure other parts of the world, namely people's (...)
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  27.  10
    Reading concept analysis: Why Draper has a point.John Paley - 2019 - Nursing Philosophy 20 (4):e12252.
    Peter Draper has offered a critique of concept analysis in nursing, suggesting that many concept analysis studies can be regarded as low‐grade literature reviews. Although I will argue en passant that he was right, defending Draper is not my main concern in this paper. Instead, I undertake a close reading of a single study, and identify a series of puzzles about what it says. The puzzles pertain to the distinction between concept and phenomenon; the function of definition; discriminating between the (...)
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  28. Uriel Aḳosta.John Paley - 1900 - [New York,:
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  29.  26
    Spirituality and nursing: a reply to Barbara Pesut.John Paley - 2008 - Nursing Philosophy 9 (2):138-140.
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  30.  11
    The Fictionalist Paradigm: A Commentary.John Paley - 2019 - Nursing Philosophy 20 (3):e12243.
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