Results for 'John O���Callaghan'

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  1.  23
    Review of John O'Callaghan, Thomist Realism and the Linguistic Turn: Toward a More Perfect Form of Existence[REVIEW]Susan Brower-Toland - 2003 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (8).
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  2.  64
    How to Go Nowhere with Language: Remarks on John O'Callaghan, Thomist Realism and the Linguistic Turn.John Deely - 2008 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (2):337-359.
    Jacques Maritain tells us that, apart from St. Thomas himself, his “principal teacher” in Thomism was John Poinsot. Poinsot, like Maritain and Thomas, expressly teaches that the basis of “Thomist realism” lies in the distinction between sentire, which makes no use of concepts, and phantasiari and intelligere, which together depend essentially on concepts. O’Callaghan makes no discussion of this point, resting his notion of realism rather on the widespread quo/quod fallacy, that is, the misinterpretation of concepts as the id (...)
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  3.  8
    Thomist Realism and the Linguistic Turn.John P. O'callaghan - 2005 - Philosophical Quarterly 55 (218):122-124.
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  4. Thomist Realism and the Linguistic Turn: Toward a More Perfect Form of Existence.John O'Callaghan - 2005 - Ars Disputandi 5:122-124.
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  5.  3
    Painted Ladies and the Witch of Endor: Response to John O’Callaghan’s “Can We Demonstrate That God Exists”?Michael S. Sherwin - 2016 - Nova et Vetera 14 (2):645-652.
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  6.  45
    Concepts, Mirrors, and Signification: Response to Deely.John O’Callaghan - 2010 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 84 (1):133-162.
    This article is a reply by the author to John Deely’s book review “How to Go Nowhere with Language: Remarks on John O’Callaghan, Thomist Realism and the Linguistic Turn”. Its main topics are: Deely’s view that, for Aquinas, the concept is distinct from the act of understanding, John of St. Thomas’s use of mirror images as a metaphor for how concepts work in cognition, and the sign relation posited by Aristotle that stands between words and concepts of (...)
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  7.  25
    The Immaterial Soul and Its Discontents.John O'Callaghan - 2015 - Acta Philosophica 24 (1):43-66.
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  8. Thomas Aquinas.Ralph McInerny & John O'Callaghan - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
     
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  9.  18
    The Plurality of Forms.John O’Callaghan - 2008 - Review of Metaphysics 62 (1):3-43.
    This paper responds to an argument of Hilary Putnam to the effect that the plurality of modern sciences shows us that any natural kind has a plurality of essences. In the past, he has argued that no system of representations, mental or linguistic, could have an intrinsic relationship to the world. Though he has granted that the Thomistic notion of form and its application to the identity of concepts may avoid these earlier objections, he has maintained that the advance of (...)
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  10.  78
    The Problem of Language and Mental Representation in Aristotle and St. Thomas.John P. O'Callaghan - 1997 - Review of Metaphysics 50 (3):499 - 545.
    Introduction. In the opening passages of his De interpretatione, Aristotle provides a simple summary of how he thinks language relates to the mind and the mind to reality, a sketch which has often been called his "semantic triangle." He writes.
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  11.  20
    Verbum Mentis: Philosophical or Theological Doctrine in Aquinas?John P. O’Callaghan - 2000 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 74:103-119.
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  12.  74
    Thomas Aquinas on Human Nature: A Philosophical Study of Summa Theologiae Ia, 75-89 (Review).John P. O'Callaghan - 2004 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (1):99-100.
    Pasnau sets the philosophy in the context of ancient and modern thought, looking at some of the most difficult areas of Aquinas's thought: the relationship of soul to body, workings of sense and intellect, will and passions, and personal identity.
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  13. Recovering Nature.Thomas Hibbs & John O'callaghan - 2001 - Philosophical Quarterly 51 (204):403-405.
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  14. Science, Philosophy, and Theology.John O'Callaghan (ed.) - 2014 - St. Augustine's Press.
     
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  15.  24
    Can We Demonstrate That “God Exists”?John O’Callaghan - 2016 - Nova et Vetera 14 (2):619-644.
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  16. Thomism and Analytic Philosophy: A Discussion.John O'callaghan - 2007 - The Thomist 71:269-317.
     
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  17.  18
    The Identity of Knower and Known: Sellars’s and McDowell’s Thomisms.John O’Callaghan - 2013 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 87:1-30.
    Wilfrid Sellars’ engagement with Thomism in “Being and Being Known” is examined, specifically for his reformulation of the thesis that the mind in its mental acts is in some sense identical in form to the object known. Borrowing the notion of “isomorphism” from modern set theory, Sellars describes an identity of form between mind and world that is non-intentional in the “Realm of the Real,” while confining all questions of meaning and truth to the “Realm of the Intentional.” John (...)
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  18.  39
    Concepts, Beings, and Things in Contemporary Philosophy and Thomas Aquinas.John O’Callaghan - 1999 - Review of Metaphysics 53 (1):69 - 98.
    IN THIS PAPER I WANT TO ADDRESS the metaphysical status of concepts in Thomas Aquinas. The need to do so is raised by contemporary criticism of Aristotelian reflections upon how language “hooks up with the world.” Many contemporary philosophers, following upon the later Wittgenstein think that in the opening passages of the De interpretatione Aristotle provides a very bad “theory” of semantic relations, when he sketches how words are related to things via the mind. It is a bad “theory” inasmuch (...)
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  19.  14
    Mercy Beyond Justice.John O’Callaghan - unknown - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association:31-53.
    Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice provides a dramatic setting for thinking about the relationship of mercy to justice, a topic of great concern to contemporary ethical and political thought. Traditionally classified as among Shakespeare’s comedies, the play can also be analyzed as a tragedy in which Shylock is the protagonist. The tragedy is driven by the relatively weak conception of mercy in relationship to justice that informs Portia’s famous soliloquy “the quality of mercy.... ” The mercy she praises is closely related (...)
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  20.  29
    More Words on the Verbum: A Response to James Doig.John O’Callaghan - 2003 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 77 (2):257-268.
    In “Verbum Mentis: Theological or Philosophical Doctrine?”, I argued against a common interpretation of Aquinas’s discussion of the verbum mentis. The common interpretation holds that the verbum mentis constitutes an essential part of Aquinas’s philosophical psychology. I argued, on the contrary, that it is no part of Aquinas’s philosophical psychology, but is a properly theological discussion grounded in the practice of scriptural metaphor, exemplified by such metaphors as “Christ is a rock.” James Doig challenges my alternate interpretation. His argument has (...)
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  21.  19
    Acts Amid Precepts: The Aristotelian Logical Structure of Thomas Aquinas's Moral TheoryKevin L. Flannery.John O'Callaghan - 2004 - Speculum 79 (2):478-479.
  22.  1
    Recovering Nature: Essays in Natural Philosophy, Ethics, and Metaphysics in Honor of Ralph Mcinerny.Ralph McInerny, Thomas S. Hibbs & John O'Callaghan - 1999
    While many 20th-century fads in philosophy and theology have come and gone, McInerny's faith in Aristotelian-Thomism was boldly prophetic. His defenses of natural theology and law helped to create dialogue between theists and non-theists, and to provide a philosophical basis for Catholic theology.
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  23.  9
    Verbum Mentis: Theological or Philosophical Doctrine.John P. O’Callaghan - 2000 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 74:103-119.
  24.  9
    Mercy Beyond Justice in Advance.John O’Callaghan - forthcoming - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association.
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  25.  12
    Epilogue: Reply to Michael S. Sherwin’s Response, “Painted Ladies and the Witch of Endor”.John O’Callaghan - 2016 - Nova et Vetera 14 (2):653-658.
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  26.  17
    The Threefold Cord: Mind, Body, and World.John O'Callaghan - 2001 - Review of Metaphysics 54 (3):678-679.
    This work consists of two lecture series and two appendices broadly critical of analytic philosophy of mind, epistemology, and metaphysics. Despite the diversity of pieces, it is a good book and enjoyable to read. The overarching theme is the inseparable interweaving of the antinomies of metaphysical and epistemological realism and antirealism bequeathed to contemporary philosophy by early modern philosophy and the theory of ideas, antinomies Putnam would avoid by rejecting the underlying framework.
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  27.  50
    Aquinas, Cognitive Theory, and Analogy: A Propos of Robert Pasnau’s Theories of Cognition in the Later Middle Ages.John P. O’Callaghan - 2002 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 76 (3):451-482.
    Is it the case that God, human beings, and air all share the same capacity for cognition, differing only in the degree to which they engage in cognitive acts? Robert Pasnau has recently argued that according to St. Thomas Aquinas they do, a conclusion that for Pasnau follows straightforwardly from Aquinas’s discussion of God’s cognition in the first part of the Summa theologiae. Further, Pasnau holds that Aquinas’s relation to contemporary cognitive theory should be understood in light of the discussion (...)
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  28.  12
    Theories of Cognition in the Later Middle Ages.John O’Callaghan - 2000 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 74 (4):674-679.
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  29. Aquinas's Rejection of Mind, Contra Kenny.John P. O'callaghan - 2002 - The Thomist 66 (1):15-59.
     
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  30.  17
    Aristotle’s Theory of Language and Meaning. [REVIEW]John O’Callaghan - 2004 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 78 (3):507-514.
  31. In Memoriam: Ralph McInerny (1929-2010).John O'Callaghan - 2010 - Anuario Filosófico 43 (98):407-410.
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  32. Review of Thomist Realism and the Linguistic Turn: Toward a More Perfect Form of Existence, by John P. O’ Callaghan. [REVIEW]Joseph W. Koterski - 2004 - Essays in Philosophy 5 (2):531-534.
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  33.  24
    Sub-Models for Interactive Unawareness.Simon Grant, J. Jude Kline, Patrick O’Callaghan & John Quiggin - 2015 - Theory and Decision 79 (4):601-613.
    We propose a notion of a sub-model for each agent at each state in the Heifetz et al. model of interactive unawareness. Presuming that each agent is fully cognizant of his sub-model causes no difficulty and fully describes his knowledge and his beliefs about the knowledge and awareness of others. We use sub-models to motivate the HMS conditions on possibility correspondences.
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  34.  21
    Pseudosex in Pseudotheology.Paul O'callaghan - 1998 - Christian Bioethics 4 (1):83-99.
    John Beaumont has attempted to revitalize the official Roman Catholic position against the use of artificial contraception by reinvigorating the argument against such from natural law. Maintaining that sexual acts are essentially reproductive acts, he holds that the use of contraceptives by married couples reduces intercourse to the same moral level as homosexual acts. He further argues that acceptance of birth control has directly led to the legitimization of homosexual acts in American society. However, his analysis fails to distinguish (...)
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  35.  8
    Thomist Realism and the Linguistic Turn: Toward a More Perfect Form of Existence by John P. O'Callaghan, University of Notre Dame Press, Notre Dame, Indiana, 2001, Pp. 392, $59.95 Hbk. [REVIEW]Dominic Ryan - 2006 - New Blackfriars 87 (1008):205-206.
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  36. Thomist Realism and the Linguistic Turn: Toward a More Perfect Form of Existence, by John P. O’Callaghan. [REVIEW]Eileen Sweeney - 2005 - Ars Disputandi 5.
     
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  37.  10
    Thomas Aquinas on Human Nature: A Philosophical Study of Summa Theologiae Ia, 75–89.John O.' & Callaghan - 2004 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (1):99.
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  38.  42
    Analytic Philosophy and The Doctrine of Signs.John Deely - 2012 - American Journal of Semiotics 28 (3/4):325 - 363.
    Thomas A. Sebeok (†2001) considered Charles Peirce as “our lodestar” in the contemporary semiotic development, and what he called “the Dominican tradition” (the Thomistic works of Aquinas, Poinsot, and Maritain in particular) as ‘a vein of pure gold’ yet to be mined in the contemporary semiotic development. By contrast, many contemporary authors look to what is called “Analytic philosophy” (as if there were such a thing as “non-analytic philosophy”) for their interpretation both of Peirce and of Sebeok’s “Dominican tradition”. Tzvetan (...)
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  39.  84
    Constructing a Theory of Sounds.Casey O'Callaghan - 2010 - Oxford Studies in Metaphysics 5:247-270.
    Vision has dominated philosophical thinking about perceptual experience and the nature of its objects. Color has long been the focus of debates about the metaphysics of sensible qualities, and philosophers have struggled to articulate the conditions on the visual experience of mind-independent objects. With few notable exceptions, "visuocentrism" has shaped our understanding of the nature and functions of perception, and of our conception of its objects. The predominant line of thought from the early modern era to the present is that, (...)
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  40.  19
    A Multisensory Philosophy of Perception.Casey O'Callaghan - 2019 - Oxford University Press.
    Nearly every theory of perception just focuses on one sense at a time; but most of the time we perceive using multiple senses. Casey O'Callaghan offers a revisionist multisensory philosophy of perception: he explores how our senses work together and influence each other, leading to surprising perceptual illusions and novel forms of experience.
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  41.  43
    Against Human Rights: John O. Nelson.John O. Nelson - 1990 - Philosophy 65 (253):341-348.
    Let me first explain what I am not attacking in this paper. I am not attacking, for instance, the right of free speech or any of the other specific rights listed in the U.S. Constitution's Bill of Rights or the United Nations' Charter. I am, rather, attacking any specific right's being called a ‘human right’. I mean to show that any such designation is not only fraudulent but, in case anyone might want to say that there can be noble lies, (...)
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  42.  33
    Are There Inalienable Rights?: John O. Nelson.John O. Nelson - 1989 - Philosophy 64 (250):519-524.
    In the United Nations' Universal Declaration of Human Rights a quite large number of things are said to be ‘human rights’ and though in that Declaration the term ‘inalienable’ is not used to describe the rights in question it has been so used by commentators—at least with respect to some of the rights enumerated. I shall forgo asking the prior question as to whether any such thing as a human right exists and ask simply whether any such thing as an (...)
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  43. Sounds: A Philosophical Theory.Casey O'Callaghan - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    ... ISBN0199215928 ... -/- Abstract: Vision dominates philosophical thinking about perception, and theorizing about experience in cognitive science traditionally has focused on a visual model. This book presents a systematic treatment of sounds and auditory experience. It demonstrates how thinking about audition and appreciating the relationships among multiple sense modalities enriches our understanding of perception. It articulates the central questions that comprise the philosophy of sound, and proposes a novel theory of sounds and their perception. Against the widely accepted philosophical (...)
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  44.  45
    O’Callaghan on Verbum Mentis in Aquinas.James C. Doig - 2003 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 77 (2):233-255.
    The essay’s point of departure is O’Callaghan’s insistence that verbum mentis is for Aquinas not a philosophical doctrine, but “a properly theological topic.” The principal evidence for this interpretation consists in the functioning of verbum mentis in certain theological passages as well as its absence in others characterized as philosophical. The essay proceeds by situating Aquinas’s doctrine of verbum mentis within the tradition from which the expression is drawn and by examining the nature of the Summa theologiae. Consequently, Aquinas is (...)
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  45.  23
    Beyond Vision: Philosophical Essays.Casey O'Callaghan - 2017 - Oxford University Press.
    Beyond Vision brings together eight essays by Casey O'Callaghan which draw theoretical and philosophical lessons about perception, the nature of its objects, and sensory awareness. O'Callaghan focuses on auditory perception, perception of spoken language, and multisensory perception.
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  46. Objects for Multisensory Perception.Casey O’Callaghan - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (5):1269-1289.
    Object perception deploys a suite of perceptual capacities that constrains attention, guides reidentification, subserves recognition, and anchors demonstrative thought. Objects for perception—perceptual objects—are the targets of such capacities. Characterizing perceptual objects for multisensory perception faces two puzzles. First is the diversity of objects across sensory modalities. Second is the unity of multisensory perceptual objects. This paper resolves the puzzles. Objects for perception are structured mereologically complex individuals. Perceptual objects are items that bear perceptible features and have perceptible parts arranged to (...)
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  47. Against Hearing Meanings.Casey O'Callaghan - 2011 - Philosophical Quarterly 61 (245):783-807.
    Listening to speech in a language you know differs phenomenologically from listening to speech in an unfamiliar language, a fact often exploited in debates about the phenomenology of thought and cognition. It is plausible that the difference is partly perceptual. Some contend that hearing familiar language involves auditory perceptual awareness of meanings or semantic properties of spoken utterances; but if this were so, there must be something distinctive it is like auditorily to perceptually experience specific meanings of spoken utterances. However, (...)
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  48.  37
    Stroud's Dream Argument Critique: John O. Nelson.John O. Nelson - 1993 - Philosophy 68 (266):473-482.
    In his recent work, The Significance of Philosophical Scepticism , Barry Stroud proposes to carry out an in-depth critique of the attempt by philosophers to invalidate all knowledge of an external world on the basis of Descartes' dream argument. His more particular aims in this endeavour are to uncover significant features of any such scepticism and to disclose in the process fundamental aspects of ‘human knowledge’ itself. Thus, among other features of knowledge that his study discloses, he thinks, is, echoing (...)
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  49. Object Perception: Vision and Audition.Casey O’Callaghan - 2008 - Philosophy Compass 3 (4):803-829.
    Vision has been the primary focus of naturalistic philosophical research concerning perception and perceptual experience. Guided by visual experience and vision science, many philosophers have focused upon theoretical issues dealing with the perception of objects. Recently, however, hearing researchers have discussed auditory objects. I present the case for object perception in vision, and argue that an analog of object perception occurs in auditory perception. I propose a notion of an auditory object that is stronger than just that of an intentional (...)
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  50. Perception and Multimodality.Casey O'Callaghan - 2012 - In Eric Margolis, Richard Samuels & Stephen Stich (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Cognitive Science. Oxford University Press.
    Philosophers and cognitive scientists of perception by custom have investigated individual sense modalities in relative isolation from each other. However, perceiving is, in a number of respects, multimodal. The traditional sense modalities should not be treated as explanatorily independent. Attention to the multimodal aspects of perception challenges common assumptions about the content and phenomenology of perception, and about the individuation and psychological nature of sense modalities. Multimodal perception thus presents a valuable opportunity for a case study in mature interdisciplinary cognitive (...)
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