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  1.  33
    Civic Laughter: Aristotle and the Political Virtue of Humor.John Lombardini - 2013 - Political Theory 41 (2):0090591712470624.
    While the loss of the second book of the Poetics has deprived us of Aristotle’s most extensive account of laughter and comedy, his discussion of eutrapelia (wittiness) as a virtue in his ethical works and in the Rhetoric points toward the importance of humor for his ethical and political thought. This article offers a reconstruction of Aristotle’s account of wittiness and attempts to explain how the virtue of wittiness would animate the everyday interactions of ordinary citizens. Placing Aristotle’s account of (...)
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  2.  11
    Isonomia and the public sphere in democratic Athens.John Lombardini - 2013 - History of Political Thought 34 (3):393-420.
    This article argues that the term isonomia is best understood as a specific type of balance of forces closely connected with the classical concept of demokratia. The article proceeds by placing isonomia within the context of fifth/fourth century Athenian political discourse, and by explicating the relationship between isonomia and eunomia through attention to the usages of these terms in Greek philosophy, poetry, oratory, history and medicine. This analysis demonstrates how the concept of isonomia, understood as a balance of forces created (...)
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  3. The politics of Socratic humor.John Lombardini - 2018 - Oakland, California: University of California Press.
    Was Socrates an ironist? Did he mock his interlocutors, and in doing so, show disdain for both them and the institutions of Athenian democracy? These questions were debated with great seriousness by generations of ancient Greek writers and helped to define a primary strand of the western tradition of political thought. Reconstructing these debates, The Politics of Socratic Humor compares the very different interpretations of Socrates developed by his followers--such diverse thinkers as Plato, Aristotle, Xenophon, Aristophanes, and the Hellenistic Philosophers--to (...)
     
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  4.  11
    Comic Authority in Aristophanes’ Knights.John Lombardini - 2012 - Polis 29 (1):130-149.
    This article investigates the relationship between comic speech and political authority in democratic Athens through a reading of Aristophanes’ Knights. The article surveys three different interpretations of how Aristophanes constructs the authority of his comic persona in the play: he contrasts comic speech with rhetorical speech to illustrate the superiority of the former ; he reflexively reveals to the audience the potential deceptiveness of comic speech ; and he mocks his own claims to authority through the construction of a comically (...)
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  5.  24
    The politics of sincerity: Plato, frank speech and democratic judgment by Elizabeth Markovits.John Lombardini - 2013 - Contemporary Political Theory 12 (1):e5.
  6.  1
    Philosophy, Poetry, and Power in Aristophanes’s Birds, written by Daniel Holmes.John Lombardini - 2022 - Polis 39 (2):414-417.
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