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  1.  91
    Language and Life History: A New Perspective on the Development and Evolution of Human Language.John L. Locke & Barry Bogin - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):259-280.
    It has long been claimed that Homo sapiens is the only species that has language, but only recently has it been recognized that humans also have an unusual pattern of growth and development. Social mammals have two stages of pre-adult development: infancy and juvenility. Humans have two additional prolonged and pronounced life history stages: childhood, an interval of four years extending between infancy and the juvenile period that follows, and adolescence, a stage of about eight years that stretches from juvenility (...)
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  2.  21
    Parental Selection of Vocal Behavior.John L. Locke - 2006 - Human Nature 17 (2):155-168.
    Although all natural languages are spoken, there is no accepted account of the evolution of a skill prerequisite to language—control of the movements of speech. If selection applied at sexual maturity, individuals achieving some command of articulate vocal behavior in previous stages would have enjoyed unusual advantages in adulthood. I offer a parental selection hypothesis, according to which hominin parents apportioned care, in part, on the basis of their infants’ vocal behavior. Specifically, it is suggested that persistent or noxious crying (...)
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  3.  32
    Trickle-Up Phonetics: A Vocal Role for the Infant.John L. Locke - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):516-516.
    Falk claims that human language took a step forward when infants lost their ability to cling and were placed on the ground, increasing their fears, which mothers assuaged prosodically. This claim, which is unsupported by anthropological and psychological evidence, would have done little for the syllabic and segmental structure of language, and ignores infants' own contribution to the process.
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  4.  19
    Deaf Children's Phonetic, Visual, and Dactylic Coding in a Grapheme Recall Task.John L. Locke & Virginia L. Locke - 1971 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 89 (1):142.
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  5. The Indexical Voice: Communication of Personal States and Traits in Humans and Other Primates.John L. Locke - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Many studies of primate vocalization have been undertaken to improve our understanding of the evolution of language. Perhaps, for this reason, investigators have focused on calls that were thought to carry symbolic information about the environment. Here I suggest that even if these calls were in fact symbolic, there were independent reasons to question this approach in the first place. I begin by asking what kind of communication system would satisfy a species’ biological needs. For example, where animals benefit from (...)
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  6.  27
    The Need for Psychological Needs: A Role for Social Capital.John L. Locke & Catherine M. Flanagan - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):495-496.
    Van de Vliert embraces a model of human needs, underplaying a model whereby individuals, motivated by psychological needs, develop coping strategies that help them meet their personal goals and collectively exert an influence on social and economic systems. Undesirable climates may inflate the value of financial capital, but they also boost the value of social capital.
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  7.  34
    Vocal Innovation.John L. Locke - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (4):415-416.
    An important form of innovation involves use of the voice in a new way, usually to solve some environmental problem. Vocal innovation occurs in humans and other animals, including chimpanzees. The framework outlined in the target article, appropriately modified, may permit new perspectives on the use of others as tools, especially by infants, and the evolution of speech and language.
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  8.  35
    The Trait of Human Language: Lessons From the Canal Boat Children of England.John L. Locke - 2008 - Biology and Philosophy 23 (3):347-361.
    To fully understand human language, an evolved trait that develops in the young without formal instruction, it must be possible to observe language that has not been influenced by instruction. But in modern societies, much of the language that is used, and most of the language that is measured, is confounded by literacy and academic training. This diverts empirical attention from natural habits of speech, causing theorists to miss critical features of linguistic practice. To dramatize this point, I examine data (...)
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  9.  14
    Bimodal Signaling in Infancy: Motor Behavior, Reference, and the Evolution of Spoken Language.John L. Locke - 2007 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 8 (1):159-175.
  10.  27
    Dancing with Humans: Interaction as Unintended Consequence.John L. Locke - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):632-633.
    Parallels to Shanker & King's (S&K's) proposal for a model of language teaching that values dyadic interaction have long existed in language development, for the neotenous human infant requires care, which is inherently interactive. Interaction with talking caregivers facilitates language learning. The “new” paradigm thus has a decidedly familiar look. It would be surprising if some other paradigm worked better in animals that have no evolutionary linguistic history.
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  11.  14
    Electromyography and Lipreading in the Detection of Verbal Rehearsal.John L. Locke & Mickey Ginsburg - 1975 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 5 (3):246-248.
  12.  16
    Phonemic Effects in the Silent Reading of Hearing and Deaf Children.John L. Locke - 1978 - Cognition 6 (3):175-187.
  13.  1
    Bimodal Signaling in Infancy.John L. Locke - 2007 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 8 (1):159-175.
    It has long been asserted that the evolutionary path to spoken language was paved by manual–gestural behaviors, a claim that has been revitalized in response to recent research on mirror neurons. Renewed interest in the relationship between manual and vocal behavior draws attention to its development. Here, the pointing and vocalization of 16.5-month-old infants are reported as a function of the context in which they occurred. When infants operated in a referential mode, the frequency of simultaneous vocalization and pointing exceeded (...)
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