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John Kaler [15]John H. Kaler [1]
  1.  91
    Differentiating Stakeholder Theories.John Kaler - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 46 (1):71 - 83.
    Following on from work on stakeholder identification, this paper constructs a typology of stakeholder theories based on the extent to which serving the interests of non-shareholders relative to those of shareholders is accepted as a responsibility of companies. A typology based on the division of stakeholder theories into normative, descriptive, and instrumental is rejected on the grounds that the latter two designations refer to second order theories rather than divisions within stakeholder theory and the first is a designation which, for (...)
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  2.  89
    Morality and Strategy in Stakeholder Identification.John Kaler - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 39 (1-2):91 - 99.
    Definitions of what it is to be a stakeholder are divided into "claimant" definitions requiring some sort of claim on the services of a business, "influencer" definitions requiring only a capacity to influence the workings of the business, and "combinatory" definitions allowing for either or both of these requirements. It is argued that for the purposes of business ethics, stakeholding has to be about improving the moral conduct of businesses by directing them at serving more than just the interests of (...)
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  3.  43
    Positioning Business Ethics in Relation to Management and Political Philosophy.John Kaler - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 24 (3):257 - 272.
    This paper attempts to mediate between the extremes of a managerial conception of business ethics which subordinates it to management and a political conception which subordinates it to political philosophy. The mediated position arrived at sees the central focus of business ethics in the intersection of micro-managerial concerns with macro-political ones provided by the task of determining morally optimum forms of business. Involvement with the macro rules out subordination to management while, conversely, involvement with the micro rules out subordination to (...)
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  4.  53
    What's the Good of Ethical Theory?John Kaler - 1999 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 8 (4):206–213.
    It is argued that presently prevailing ethical theories can be largely dispensed with. Such theories are of limited use in solving ethical problems. They fail because they are ‘reductionist’. They take an aspect of morality to be the whole of morality. Moreover, the very process of constructing, testing, and modifying them reveals that we already have that understanding of the nature of the ethical which they purport to provide us with. That prior understanding is the identification of morality with the (...)
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  5.  36
    Reasons to Be Ethical: Self-Interest and Ethical Business. [REVIEW]John Kaler - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 27 (1-2):161 - 173.
    This paper examines the self-interested reasons that businesses can have for ethical behaviour. It distinguishes between economic and non-economic reasons and, among the latter, notes those connected with the self-esteem of managers. It offers a detailed typology of prudential reasons for ethical behaviour, laying particular stress on those to do with avoiding punishment by society for wrongdoing and, more particularly still, stresses the role of campaigning pressure groups within that particular category of reasons. It goes on to suggest that because (...)
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  6.  22
    Responsibility, Accountability and Governance.John Kaler - 2002 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 11 (4):327–334.
    ‘Responsibility’, ‘accountability’ and ‘governance’ are key terms within business ethics. This paper aims to construct a framework to help us understand the relationships between these terms. I first of all analyse the concept of responsibility to show the place of accountability within it, then move to analyse accountability as a sub–concept of responsibility, then finally attempt to show how accountability along with responsibility in general figures within governance structures. While obviously not as complex as the concept of responsibility of which (...)
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  7.  43
    Stakeholder Democracy: Towards a Multi-Disciplinary View.Andrew Crane, Ciaran Driver, John Kaler, Martin Parker & John Parkinson - 2005 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 14 (1):67–75.
  8.  30
    Arriving at an Acceptable Formulation of Stakeholder Theory.John Kaler & Senior Lecturer - 2004 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 13 (1):73–79.
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  9.  16
    Arriving at an Acceptable Formulation of Stakeholder Theory.John Kaler - 2004 - Business Ethics: A European Review 13 (1):73-79.
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  10.  11
    Discussion: Putting Ethical Theory in its Place.John Kaler - 2000 - Business Ethics: A European Review 9 (3):211-217.
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  11.  37
    What Is a Business?John Kaler - 2003 - Philosophy of Management 3 (2):57-65.
    Understanding just what it is to he a business is a vital though neglected topic in business ethics. The account given here makes the possession of customers the defining feature. This excludes obvious non-businesses while allowing the widest possible range of options for deciding on the morally preferable form or forms which businesses should take.
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  12.  28
    Understanding Participation.John Kaler - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 21 (2-3):125 - 135.
    The word 'participation' is taken to refer to a situation in which employees have some sort of share in the businesses which employ them. On this basis a classificatory scheme is produced which distinguishes between different forms of participation as well as the sources and motives behind those different forms. Participation as a whole is then distinguished from bargaining between management and labour. In bargaining, separate and opposing interests are accepted. In participation, there is an attempt to produce an over-arching (...)
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  13.  8
    Discussion: Putting Ethical Theory in its Place.John Kaler - 2000 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 9 (3):211-217.
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