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John Gowdy [7]John M. Gowdy [5]
  1.  52
    The economic origins of ultrasociality.John Gowdy & Lisi Krall - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39:1-63.
    Ultrasociality refers to the social organization of a few species, including humans and some social insects, having a complex division of labor, city-states, and an almost exclusive dependence on agriculture for subsistence. We argue that the driving forces in the evolution of these ultrasocial societies were economic. With the agricultural transition, species could directly produce their own food and this was such a competitive advantage that those species now dominate the planet. Once underway, this transition was propelled by the selection (...)
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  2. Strong versus Weak Sustainability: Economics, Natural Sciences, and Consilience.Robert Ayres, Jeroen van den Berrgh & John Gowdy - 2001 - Environmental Ethics 23 (2):155-168.
    The meaning of sustainability is the subject of intense debate among environmental and resource economists. Perhaps no other issue separates more clearly the traditional economic view from the views of most natural scientists. The debate currently focuses on the substitutability between the economy and the environment or between “natural capital” and “manufactured capital”—a debate captured in terms of weak versus strong sustainability. In this article, we examine the various interpretations of these concepts. We conclude that natural science and economic perspectives (...)
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  3. Strong versus Weak Sustainability: Economics, Natural Sciences, and Consilience.John Gowdy - 2001 - Environmental Ethics 23 (2):155-168.
    The meaning of sustainability is the subject of intense debate among environmental and resource economists. Perhaps no other issue separates more clearly the traditional economic view from the views of most natural scientists. The debate currently focuses on the substitutability between the economy and the environment or between “natural capital” and “manufactured capital”—a debate captured in terms of weak versus strong sustainability. In this article, we examine the various interpretations of these concepts. We conclude that natural science and economic perspectives (...)
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  4.  64
    Economics weak and strong: Ecological economics and human survival.Andy Bahn & John Gowdy - 2003 - World Futures 59 (3 & 4):253 – 262.
    Mounting evidence suggests that the human impact on the planet is reaching the point where the Earth's ecosystems will not be able to support the level of human occupation. The global economy also seems to be generating income disparities that threaten the social stability of even the most developed economies. Although both these trends are rooted in the operation of the global market economy, standard economics has surprisingly little to offer in the way of policies that might allow us to (...)
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  5.  4
    The iron Triangle: Why The Wildlife Society Needs to Take a Position on Economic Growth.Brian Czech, Eugene Allen, David Batker, Paul Beier, Herman Daly, Jon Erickson, Pamela Garrettson, Valerius Geist, John Gowdy, Lynn Greenwalt, Helen Hands, Paul Krausman, Patrick Magee, Craig Miller, Kelly Novak, Genevieve Pullis, Chris Robinson, Jack Santa-Barbara, James Teer, David Trauger & Chuck Willer - 2003 - Wildlife Society Bulletin 31 (2):574-577.
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  6.  10
    Disengaging from the ultrasocial economy: The challenge of directing evolutionary change.John Gowdy & Lisi Krall - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
    We appreciate the depth and breadth of comments we received. They reflect the interdisciplinary challenge of our inquiry and reassured us of its broad interest. We believe that our target article and the criticisms, elaborations, and extensions of the commentators can be an important contribution to establishing human ultrasociality as a new field of social science inquiry. A few of the commentators questioned our definition of ultrasociality, and we begin our response with an elaboration of that definition and a defense (...)
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  7.  49
    Further Problems with Neoclassical Environmental Economics.John M. Gowdy & Peg R. Olsen - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (2):161-171.
    We examine the merits of neoclassical environmental economics and discuss alternative approaches to it. We argue that the basic assumptions of the neoclassical approach, embodied in the indifference curve, make that model inappropriate for environmental analysis. We begin by assuming that the basic postulates of the neoclassical model hold and then argue that even this ideal state is incompatible with environmental sustainability. We discuss the role of the discount rate, the exclusive emphasis on marginal choices, and the assumption of perfect (...)
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  8.  11
    Further Problems with Neoclassical Environmental Economics.John M. Gowdy & Peg R. Olsen - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (2):161-171.
    We examine the merits of neoclassical environmental economics and discuss alternative approaches to it. We argue that the basic assumptions of the neoclassical approach, embodied in the indifference curve, make that model inappropriate for environmental analysis. We begin by assuming that the basic postulates of the neoclassical model hold and then argue that even this ideal state is incompatible with environmental sustainability. We discuss the role of the discount rate, the exclusive emphasis on marginal choices, and the assumption of perfect (...)
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  9.  43
    Progress and environmental sustainability.John M. Gowdy - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (1):41-55.
    One of the most pervasive ideas in Western culture is the notion of progress. Among economists, it is synonymous with economic growth. According to advocates of unlimited growth, more growth will result in a cleaner environment, a stable population level, and social and economic equality. Although most environmentalists do not subscribe to the growth ethic, they generally cling to a notion of progress by arguing that there has been continual enlightenment in public attitudes toward the environment and that this enlightenment (...)
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  10.  12
    Further Problems with Neoclassical Environmental Economics.John M. Gowdy - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (2):161-171.
    We examine the merits of neoclassical environmental economics and discuss alternative approaches to it. We argue that the basic assumptions of the neoclassical approach, embodied in the indifference curve, make that model inappropriate for environmental analysis. We begin by assuming that the basic postulates of the neoclassical model hold and then argue that even this ideal state is incompatible with environmental sustainability. We discuss the role of the discount rate, the exclusive emphasis on marginal choices, and the assumption of perfect (...)
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  11.  32
    The Parable of the Bees.John Gowdy, Lisi Krall & Yunzhong Chen - 2013 - Environmental Ethics 35 (1):41-55.
    Many ecological and environmental economists take a microeconomic approach to envi­ronmental valuation and view the macroeconomy as an amalgam of firms whose primary task is to efficiently allocate scarce resources. In this framework, replacing freely provided ecosystem services with costly human-provided substitutes is by definition inefficient. Although destroying and replacing the free gifts of nature can sometimes be an economic benefit, in the case of apple-tree pollination in Maoxian County, China, the positive economic benefits do not justify eliminating the natural (...)
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