Results for 'Johanna Bach'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  25
    Universals in Linguistic Theory. (Edited by Emmon Bach, Robert T. Harms ... Contributing Authors, Charles J. Fillmore ... Paul Kiparsky ... James D. McCawley.).Emmon W. Bach & Robert Thomas Harms (eds.) - 1968 - New York, NY, USA: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston.
    Record of papers given at a symposium held at the University of Texas at Austin, April 1967; includes; C.J. Fillmore - The case for case; E. Bach - Nouns and noun phrases; J.D. McCawley - The role of semantics in a grammar; P. Kiparsky Linguistic universals and linguistic change.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  2.  16
    Die Araber Und Die Antike Wissenschaftstheorie: [Übersetzung Aus Dem Ungarischen von Johanna Till Und Gábor Kerekes].Miklos Maróth, Johanna Till & Gábor Kerekes - 1994 - Brill.
    The book then discusses another group of issues ("whether it is, what it is, how and why it is"), which determined the argumentation, the axiomatic ordering of the sciences, and concludes with a demonstration on the basis of concrete ...
    No categories
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3.  43
    Literal Meaning.Kent Bach - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (2):487-492.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   292 citations  
  4. Conversational Impliciture.Kent Bach - 1994 - Mind and Language 9 (2):124-162.
    Confusion in terms inspires confusion in concepts. When a relevant distinction is not clearly marked or not marked at all, it is apt to be blurred or even missed altogether in our thinking. This is true in any area of inquiry, pragmatics in particular. No one disputes that there are various ways in which what is communicated in an utterance can go beyond sentence meaning. The problem is to catalog the ways. It is generally recognized that linguistic meaning underdetermines speaker (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   300 citations  
  5.  47
    Reviewed Work(S): Lowness Properties and Randomness. Advances in Mathematics, Vol. 197 by André Nies; Lowness for the Class of Schnorr Random Reals. SIAM Journal on Computing, Vol. 35 by Bjørn Kjos-Hanssen; André Nies; Frank Stephan; Lowness for Kurtz Randomness. The Journal of Symbolic Logic, Vol. 74 by Noam Greenberg; Joseph S. Miller; Randomness and Lowness Notions Via Open Covers. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic, Vol. 163 by Laurent Bienvenu; Joseph S. Miller; Relativizations of Randomness and Genericity Notions. The Bulletin of the London Mathematical Society, Vol. 43 by Johanna N. Y. Franklin; Frank Stephan; Liang Yu; Randomness Notions and Partial Relativization. Israel Journal of Mathematics, Vol. 191 by George Barmpalias; Joseph S. Miller; André Nies. [REVIEW]Johanna N. Y. Franklin - forthcoming - Association for Symbolic Logic: The Bulletin of Symbolic Logic.
    Review by: Johanna N. Y. Franklin The Bulletin of Symbolic Logic, Volume 19, Issue 1, Page 115-118, March 2013.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  99
    Language, Thought and Other Biological Categories: New Foundations for Realism.Kent Bach - 1985 - Philosophy of Science 52 (3):477-478.
  7. The Myth of Conventional Implicature.Kent Bach - 1999 - Linguistics and Philosophy 22 (4):327-366.
    Grice’s distinction between what is said and what is implicated has greatly clarified our understanding of the boundary between semantics and pragmatics. Although border disputes still arise and there are certain difficulties with the distinction itself (see the end of §1), it is generally understood that what is said falls on the semantic side and what is implicated on the pragmatic side. But this applies only to what is..
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   162 citations  
  8. Do Objects Depend on Structures?Johanna Wolff - 2012 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 63 (3):607-625.
    Ontic structural realists hold that structure is all there is, or at least all there is fundamentally. This thesis has proved to be puzzling: What exactly does it say about the relationship between objects and structures? In this article, I look at different ways of articulating ontic structural realism in terms of the relation between structures and objects. I show that objects cannot be reduced to structure, and argue that ontological dependence cannot be used to establish strong forms of structural (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  9.  12
    André Nies. Lowness Properties and Randomness. Advances in Mathematics, Vol. 197 , No. 1, Pp. 274–305. - Bjørn Kjos-Hanssen, André Nies, and Frank Stephan. Lowness for the Class of Schnorr Random Reals. SIAM Journal on Computing, Vol. 35 , No. 3, Pp. 647–657. - Noam Greenberg and Joseph S. Miller. Lowness for Kurtz Randomness. The Journal of Symbolic Logic, Vol. 74 , No. 2, Pp. 665–678. - Laurent Bienvenu and Joseph S. Miller. Randomness and Lowness Notions Via Open Covers. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic, Vol. 163 , No. 5, Pp. 506–518. - Johanna N. Y. Franklin, Frank Stephan, and Liang. Yu Relativizations of Randomness and Genericity Notions. The Bulletin of the London Mathematical Society, Vol. 43 , No. 4, Pp. 721–733. - George Barmpalias, Joseph S. Miller, and André Nies. Randomness Notions and Partial Relativization. Israel Journal of Mathematics, Vol. 191 , No. 2, Pp. 791–816. [REVIEW]Johanna N. Y. Franklin - 2013 - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 19 (1):115-118.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Do Belief Reports Report Beliefs?Kent Bach - 1997 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 78 (3):215-241.
    The traditional puzzles about belief reports puzzles rest on a certain seemingly innocuous assumption, that 'that'-clauses specify belief contents. The main theories of belief reports also rest on this "Specification Assumption", that for a belief report of the form 'A believes that p' to be true,' the proposition that p must be among the things A believes. I use Kripke's Paderewski case to call the Specification Assumption into question. Giving up that assumption offers prospects for an intuitively more plausible approach (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   103 citations  
  11. Applying Pragmatics to Epistemology.Kent Bach - 2008 - Philosophical Issues 18 (1):68-88.
    This paper offers a smattering of applications of pragmatics to epistemology. In most cases they concern recent epistemological claims that depend for their plausibility on mistaking something pragmatic for something semantic. After giving my formulation of the semantic/pragmatic distinction and explaining how seemingly semantic intuitions can be responsive to pragmatic factors, I take up the following topics: 1. Classic Examples of Confusing Meaning and Use 2. Pragmatic Implications of Hedging or Intensifying an Assertion 3. Belief Attributions 4. Knowledge-wh 5. The (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   78 citations  
  12. Concepts: Where Cognitive Science Went Wrong.Kent Bach - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (4):627.
    As the dust jacket proclaims, “this is surely Fodor’s most irritating book in years …. It should exasperate philosophers, linguists, cognitive psychologists, and cognitive neuroscientists alike.” Yes, Fodor is an equal-opportunity annoyer. He sees no job for conceptual analysts, no hope for lexical semanticists, and no need for prototype theorists. When it comes to shedding light on concepts, these luminaries have delivered nothing but moonshine. Fodor aims to remedy things, and not just with snake oil. He serves up plenty of (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  13. Intentions and Demonstrations.Kent Bach - 1992 - Analysis 52 (3):140--146.
    MARGA REIMER has forcefully challenged David Kaplan's recent claim ([3], pp. 582-4) that demonstrative gestures, in connnection with uses of demonstrative expressions, are without semantic significance and function merely as 'aids to communication', and that speaker intentions are what determine the demonstratum. Against this Reimer argues that demonstrations can and do play an essential semantic role and that the role of intentions is marginal at best. That is, together with the linguistic meaning of the demonstrative phrase being used, an act (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   49 citations  
  14.  96
    Godel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid.Douglas R. Hofstadter - 1979 - Hassocks, England: Basic Books.
    A young scientist and mathematician explores the mystery and complexity of human thought processes from an interdisciplinary point of view.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   487 citations  
  15. Spin as a Determinable.Johanna Wolff - 2015 - Topoi 34 (2):379-386.
    In this paper I aim to answer two questions: Can spin be treated as a determinable? Can a treatment of spin as a determinable be used to understand quantum indeterminacy? In response to the first question I show that the relations among spin number, spin components and spin values cannot be captured by a single determination relation; instead we need to look at spin number and spin value separately. In response to the second question I discuss three ways in which (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  16. Default Reasoning: Jumping to Conclusions and Knowing When to Think Twice.Kent Bach - 1984 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 65 (1):37.
    Look before you leap. - Proverb. He who hesitates is lost. - Another proverb.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   76 citations  
  17. Jeroen Van Bouwel, Ed. 2009. The Social Sciences and Democracy (Johanna Thoma). [REVIEW]Johanna Thoma - 2012 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 27 (2):247-251.
  18. Context Ex Machina.Kent Bach - 2005 - In Zoltan Gendler Szabo (ed.), Semantics Versus Pragmatics. Oxford University Press. pp. 15--44.
    Once upon a time it was assumed that speaking literally and directly is the norm and that speaking nonliterally or indirectly is the exception. The assumption was that normally what a speaker means can be read off of the meaning of the sentence he utters, and that departures from this, if not uncommon, are at least easily distinguished from normal utterances and explainable along Gricean lines. The departures were thought to be limited to obvious cases like figurative speech and conversational (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   68 citations  
  19. Knowledge in and Out of Context.Kent Bach - 2007 - In Joseph Keim Campbell, Michael O.’Rourke & Harry S. Silverstein (eds.), Knowledge and Skepticism. MIT Press. pp. 105--36.
    In this chapter, the author offers another explanation of the variation in contents, which is explained by contextualism as being related to a variation in standards. The author’s explanation posits that the contents of knowledge attributions are invariant. The variation lies in what knowledge attributions we are willing to make or accept. Although not easy to acknowledge, what contextualism counts as knowledge varies with the context in which it is attributed. A new rival to contextualism, known as Subject-Sensitive Invariantism, goes (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  20. Naturalistic Quietism or Scientific Realism?Johanna Wolff - 2019 - Synthese 196 (2):485-498.
    Realists about science tend to hold that our scientific theories aim for the truth, that our successful theories are at least partly true, and that the entities referred to by the theoretical terms of these theories exist. Antirealists about science deny one or more of these claims. A sizable minority of philosophers of science prefers not to take sides: they believe the realism debate to be fundamentally mistaken and seek to abstain from it altogether. In analogy with other realism debates (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  21.  17
    It's How You Get There: Walking Down a Virtual Alley Activates Premotor and Parietal Areas.Johanna Wagner, Teodoro Solis-Escalante, Reinhold Scherer, Christa Neuper & Gernot Müller-Putz - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  22. Giorgione Was so-Called Because of His Name.Kent Bach - 2002 - Philosophical Perspectives 16:73-103.
    Proper names seem simple on the surface. Indeed, anyone unfamiliar with philosophical debates about them might wonder what the fuss could possibly be about. It seems obvious why we need them and what we do with them, and that is to talk about particular persons, places, and things. You don't have to be as smart as Mill to think that proper names are simply tags attached to individuals. But sometimes appearances are deceiving.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   65 citations  
  23.  61
    Foucault on Freedom.Johanna Oksala - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    Freedom and the subject were guiding themes for Michel Foucault throughout his philosophical career. In this clear and comprehensive analysis of his thought, Johanna Oksala identifies the different interpretations of freedom in his philosophy and examines three major divisions of it: the archaeological, the genealogical, and the ethical. She shows convincingly that in order to appreciate Foucault's project fully we must understand his complex relationship to phenomenology, and she discusses Foucault's treatment of the body in relation to recent feminist (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  24. Refraining, Omitting, and Negative Acts.Kent Bach - unknown
    The basic question of action theory, what it is to do something, invites the complementary question of what it is to fail to do something (and not merely not do it). At every moment there are zillions of things that you’re not doing but few if any that you’re failing to do. There seem to be four (partly overlapping) ways of failing to do something.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  25. Quantification, Qualification and Context a Reply to Stanley and Szabó.Kent Bach - 2000 - Mind and Language 15 (2-3):262–283.
    We hardly ever mean exactly what we say. I don’t mean that we generally speak figuratively or that we’re generally insincere. Rather, I mean that we generally speak loosely, omitting words that could have made what we meant more explicit and letting our audience fill in the gaps. Language works far more efficiently when we do that. Literalism can have its virtues, as when we’re drawing up a contract, programming a computer, or writing a philosophy paper, but we generally opt (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   58 citations  
  26.  53
    Picoeconomics: The Strategic Interaction of Successive Motivational States Within the Person.Kent Bach - 1995 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (4):981-983.
    There is a simple view of motivation on which desires are like pain-killers; they come in different strengths, and their strength determines their efficacy. That is, the stronger a desire the greater its motivational force and, when two desires conflict, the stronger one “wins out” over the weaker. This view makes it puzzling how anyone could ever exhibit “strength of will” and act on the weaker desire, even when it is a desire for something more highly valued than what is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   77 citations  
  27. The Semantics Pragmatics Distinction: What It is and Why It Matters.Kent Bach - 1997 - In K. Turner (ed.), The Semantics-Pragmatics Interface From Different Points of View. Elsevier. pp. 65--84.
    The distinction between semantics and pragmatics is easier to apply than to explain. Explaining it is complicated by the fact that many conflicting formulations have been proposed over the past sixty years. This might suggest that there is no one way of drawing the distinction and that how to draw it is merely a terminological question, a matter of arbitrary stipulation. In my view, though, these diverse formulations, despite their conflicts, all shed light on the distinction as it is commonly (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   64 citations  
  28. Loaded Words: On the Semantics and Pragmatics of Slurs.Kent Bach - 2018 - In David Sosa (ed.), Bad Words: Philosophical Perspectives on Slurs. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 60-76.
    There are many mean and nasty things to say about mean and nasty talk, but I don't plan on saying any of them. There's a specific problem about slurring words that I want to address. This is a semantic problem. It's not very important compared to the real-world problems presented by bigotry, racism, discrimination, and worse. It's important only to linguistics and the philosophy of language.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  29. You Don't Say?Kent Bach - 2001 - Synthese 128 (1):15-44.
    This paper defends a purely semantic notion of what is said against various recent objections. The objections each cite some sort of linguistic, psychological, or epistemological fact that is supposed to show that on any viable notion of what a speaker says in uttering a sentence, there is pragmatic intrusion into what is said. Relying on a modified version of Grice's notion, on which what is said must be a projection of the syntax of the uttered sentence, I argue that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   78 citations  
  30.  10
    Change in View: Principles of Reasoning.Kent Bach - 1988 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 48 (4):761-764.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  31. Are Conservation Laws Metaphysically Necessary?Johanna Wolff - 2013 - Philosophy of Science 80 (5):898-906.
    Are laws of nature necessary, and if so, are all laws of nature necessary in the same way? This question has played an important role in recent discussion of laws of nature. I argue that not all laws of nature are necessary in the same way: conservation laws are perhaps to be regarded as metaphysically necessary. This sheds light on both the modal character of conservation laws and the relationship between different varieties of necessity.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  32.  90
    The Epistemic Division of Labor Revisited.Johanna Thoma - 2015 - Philosophy of Science 82 (3):454-472.
    Some scientists are happy to follow in the footsteps of others; some like to explore novel approaches. It is tempting to think that herein lies an epistemic division of labor conducive to overall scientific progress: the latter point the way to fruitful areas of research, and the former more fully explore those areas. Weisberg and Muldoon’s model, however, suggests that it would be best if all scientists explored novel approaches. I argue that this is due to implausible modeling choices, and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  33.  26
    Intra- and Interbrain Synchronization and Network Properties When Playing Guitar in Duets.Johanna Sänger, Viktor Müller & Ulman Lindenberger - 2012 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
  34. Risk Aversion and the Long Run.Johanna Thoma - 2019 - Ethics 129 (2):230-253.
    This article argues that Lara Buchak’s risk-weighted expected utility theory fails to offer a true alternative to expected utility theory. Under commonly held assumptions about dynamic choice and the framing of decision problems, rational agents are guided by their attitudes to temporally extended courses of action. If so, REU theory makes approximately the same recommendations as expected utility theory. Being more permissive about dynamic choice or framing, however, undermines the theory’s claim to capturing a steady choice disposition in the face (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  35. The Emperor's New 'Knows'.Kent Bach - 2005 - In Gerhard Preyer & Georg Peter (eds.), Contextualism in Philosophy: Knowledge, Meaning, and Truth. Oxford University Press. pp. 51--89.
    When I examine contextualism there is much that I can doubt. I can doubt whether it is a cogent theory that I examining, and not a cleverly stated piece of whacks. I can doubt whether there is any real theory there at all. Perhaps what I took to be a theory was really some reflections; perhaps I am even the victim of some cognitive hallucination. One thing however I cannot doubt: that there exists a widely read pitch of a round (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   77 citations  
  36. Impliciture Vs. Explicature: What's the Difference?Kent Bach - manuscript
    I am often asked to explain the difference between my notion of impliciture (Bach 1994) and the relevance theorists’ notion of explicature (Sperber and Wilson 1986; Carston 2002). Despite the differences between the theoretical frameworks within which they operate, the two notions seem very similar. Relevance theorists describe explicatures as “developments of logical forms,” whereas I think of implicitures as “expansions” or “completions” of semantic contents (depending on whether or not the sentence’s semantic content amounts to a proposition). That (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  37. Searle Against the World : How Can Experiences Find Their Objects?Kent Bach - 2007 - In Savas L. Tsohatzidis (ed.), John Searle's Philosophy of Language: Force, Meaning, and Mind. Cambridge University Press.
    Here's an old question in the philosophy of perception: here I am, looking at this pen [I hold up a pen in my hand]. Presumably I really am seeing this pen. Even so, I could be having an experience just like the one I am having without anything being there. So how can the experience I am having really involve direct awareness of the pen? It seems as though the presence of the pen is inessential to the way the experience (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  38. A Rationale for Reliabilism.Kent Bach - 1985 - The Monist 68 (2):246-263.
    What bothers people about reliabilism as a theory of justified belief? It has yet to be formulated adequately, but most philosophical theories have that problem. People seem to be bothered by the very idea of reliabilism, with its apparent disregard for believers’ rationality and responsibility. Yet its supporters can’t seem to understand its opponents complaints. I believe that the conflict can be clarified, if not resolved, by drawing certain important distinctions.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   70 citations  
  39. Getting a Thing Into a Thought.Kent Bach - 2010 - In Robin Jeshion (ed.), New Essays on Singular Thought. Oxford University Press. pp. 39.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  40.  7
    Meaning and the Moral Sciences.Kent Bach - 1979 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 40 (1):137-139.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  41. Decision Theory.Johanna Thoma - 2019 - In Richard Pettigrew & Jonathan Weisberg (eds.), The Open Handbook of Formal Epistemology. PhilPapers Foundation. pp. 57-106.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  42.  5
    Feminists Read Habermas: Gendering the Subject of Discourse.Johanna Meehan (ed.) - 1995 - Routledge.
    This important new collection considers Jurgen Habermas's discourse theory from a variety of feminist vantage points. Feminist scholars have been drawn to Habermas's work because it reflects a tradition of emancipatory political thinking rooted in the Enlightenment and engages with the normative aims of emancipatory social movements. The essays in Feminists Read Habermas analyze various aspects of Habermas's work, ranging from his moral theory to political issues of identity and participation. The contributors share a conviction about the potential significance of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  43. Analogical Cognition: Applications in Epistemology and the Philosophy of Mind and Language.Theodore Bach - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (5):348-360.
    Analogical cognition refers to the ability to detect, process, and learn from relational similarities. The study of analogical and similarity cognition is widely considered one of the ‘success stories’ of cognitive science, exhibiting convergence across many disciplines on foundational questions. Given the centrality of analogy to mind and knowledge, it would benefit philosophers investigating topics in epistemology and the philosophies of mind and language to become familiar with empirical models of analogical cognition. The goal of this essay is to describe (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  44. Descriptions: Points of Reference.Kent Bach - 2004 - In Marga Reimer & Anne Bezuidenhout (eds.), Descriptions and Beyond. Clarendon Press. pp. 189-229.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  45.  35
    In Defence of Revealed Preference Theory.Johanna Thoma - 2021 - Economics and Philosophy 37 (2):163-187.
    This paper defends revealed preference theory against a pervasive line of criticism, according to which revealed preference methodology relies on appealing to some mental states, in particular an agent’s beliefs, rendering the project incoherent or unmotivated. I argue that all that is established by these arguments is that revealed preference theorists must accept a limited mentalism in their account of the options an agent should be modelled as choosing between. This is consistent both with an essentially behavioural interpretation of preference (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  46. Engineering the Mind (Review of Dretske 1995, Naturalizing the Mind). [REVIEW]Kent Bach - 1997 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 57 (2):459-468.
    No contemporary philosopher has tried harder to demystify the mind than Fred Dretske. But how to demystify it without eviscerating it? Can consciousness be explained? Many philosophers think that no matter how detailed and systematic our knowledge becomes of how the brain works and how it subserves mental functions, there will always remain an "explanatory gap." Call it a brute fact or call it a mystery, trying to explain consciousness, they think, is as futile as trying to explain why there (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  47. Minding the Gap.Kent Bach - 2004 - In Claudia Bianchi (ed.), The Semantics/Pragmatics Distinction. CSLI Publications. pp. 27--43.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  48. Why the Empirical Study of Non-philosophical Expertise Does not Undermine the Status of Philosophical Expertise.Theodore Bach - 2019 - Erkenntnis 86 (4):999-1023.
    In some domains experts perform better than novices, and in other domains experts do not generally perform better than novices. According to empirical studies of expert performance, this is because the former but not the latter domains make available to training practitioners a direct form of learning feedback. Several philosophers resource this empirical literature to cast doubt on the quality of philosophical expertise. They claim that philosophy is like the dubious domains in that it does not make available the good, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49.  41
    Aggregate Relevant Claims in Rescue Cases?Johanna Privitera - 2018 - Utilitas 30 (2):228-236.
    In 'How Should We Aggregate Competing Claims', Alex Voorhoeve suggests accommodating intuitions about duties in rescue cases by combining aggregative and non-aggregative elements into one theory. In this paper, I discuss two problems Voorhoeve’s theory faces as a result of requiring a cyclic pattern of choice, and argue that his attempt to solve them does not succeed.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  50. Instrumental Rationality Without Separability.Johanna Thoma - 2020 - Erkenntnis 85 (5):1219-1240.
    This paper argues that instrumental rationality is more permissive than expected utility theory. The most compelling instrumentalist argument in favour of separability, its core requirement, is that agents with non-separable preferences end up badly off by their own lights in some dynamic choice problems. I argue that once we focus on the question of whether agents’ attitudes to uncertain prospects help define their ends in their own right, or instead only assign instrumental value in virtue of the outcomes they may (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000