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  1.  53
    End-of-life decisions of physicians in the city of hasselt (flanders, belgium).Freddy Mortier, Luc Deliens, Johan Bilsen, Marc Cosyns, Koen Ingels & Robert Vander Stichele - 2000 - Bioethics 14 (3):254–267.
    Objectives: The objective of this study is to estimate the proportion of different types of end‐of‐life decisions (ELDs) of physicians in the city of Hasselt (Flanders, Belgium). The question is addressed to what degree these ELD meet legal constraints and the ethical requirements for prudent practice. Methodology: All physicians of the city of Hasselt who signed at least one death certificate in 1996 (N=166) received an anonymous self‐administered mail questionnaire per death case (max. 5/doctor) Results: the response rate was 55% (...)
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  2.  57
    Forgoing Treatment at the End of Life in 6 European Countries.Georg Bosshard, Tore Nilstun, Johan Bilsen, Michael Norup, Guido Miccinesi, Johannes J. M. van Delden, Karin Faisst, Agnes van der Heide & for the European End-of-Life - 2005 - JAMA Internal Medicine 165 (4):401-407.
    Modern medicine provides unprecedented opportunities in diagnostics and treatment. However, in some situations at the end of a patient’s life, many physicians refrain from using all possible measures to prolong life. We studied the incidence of different types of treatment withheld or withdrawn in 6 European countries and analyzed the main background characteristics.
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  3.  47
    End‐of‐life Decisions of Physicians in the city of Hasselt (Flanders, Belgium).Freddy Mortier, Luc Deliens, Johan Bilsen, Marc Cosyns, Koen Ingels & Robert Vander Stichele - 2000 - Bioethics 14 (3):254-267.
    Objectives: The objective of this study is to estimate the proportion of different types of end‐of‐life decisions (ELDs) of physicians in the city of Hasselt (Flanders, Belgium). The question is addressed to what degree these ELD meet legal constraints and the ethical requirements for prudent practice.Methodology: All physicians of the city of Hasselt who signed at least one death certificate in 1996 (N=166) received an anonymous self‐administered mail questionnaire per death case (max. 5/doctor)Results: the response rate was 55% (N=269). In (...)
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  4.  6
    Dealing with sexual boundary violation in mental healthcare institutions by government policies: the case of Flanders, Belgium.Johan Bilsen, Hubert Van Puyenbroeck, Dirk De Wachter, Frieda Matthys, Kim Dewilde & Lara Vesentini - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1):1-8.
    BackgroundTo prevent sexual boundary violations (SBV) in mental health care institutions overall governments require these institutions to report SBV incidents to a central registry and to develop institutional guidelines how to react. In Europe SBV policies are only recently developed or implemented, as is also the case in Flanders (Belgium). The implementation of a new institutional policy is always a challenge and can encounter resistance, especially when it concerns SBV, because they remain delicate and complex.MethodThis study evaluated the extent to (...)
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  5.  83
    The Moral Difference or Equivalence Between Continuous Sedation Until Death and Physician-Assisted Death: Word Games or War Games?: A Qualitative Content Analysis of Opinion Pieces in the Indexed Medical and Nursing Literature. [REVIEW]Sam Rys, Reginald Deschepper, Freddy Mortier, Luc Deliens, Douglas Atkinson & Johan Bilsen - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (2):171-183.
    Continuous sedation until death (CSD), the act of reducing or removing the consciousness of an incurably ill patient until death, often provokes medical–ethical discussions in the opinion sections of medical and nursing journals. Some argue that CSD is morally equivalent to physician-assisted death (PAD), that it is a form of “slow euthanasia.” A qualitative thematic content analysis of opinion pieces was conducted to describe and classify arguments that support or reject a moral difference between CSD and PAD. Arguments pro and (...)
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  6.  63
    Continuous sedation until death: moral justifications of physicians and nurses—a content analysis of opinion pieces. [REVIEW]Sam Rys, Freddy Mortier, Luc Deliens, Reginald Deschepper, Margaret Pabst Battin & Johan Bilsen - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):533-542.
    Continuous sedation until death (CSD), the act of reducing or removing the consciousness of an incurably ill patient until death, often provokes medical-ethical discussions in the opinion sections of medical and nursing journals. A content analysis of opinion pieces in medical and nursing literature was conducted to examine how clinicians define and describe CSD, and how they justify this practice morally. Most publications were written by physicians and published in palliative or general medicine journals. Terminal Sedation and Palliative Sedation are (...)
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