66 found
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  1. The indispensability of character.Joel J. Kupperman - 2001 - Philosophy 76 (2):239-250.
    Gilbert Harman has argued that it does not make sense to ascribe character traits to people. The notion of morally virtuous character becomes particularly suspect. How plausible this is depends on how broad character traits would have to be. Views of character as entirely invariant behavioural tendencies offer a soft target. This paper explores a view that is a less easy target: character traits as specific to kinds of situation, and as involving probabilities or real possibilities. Such ascriptions are not (...)
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  2. PART 4 107 Weakness and integrity 8 Moral growth and the unity of the virtues 109.Bonnie Kent, Jan Steutel, David Carr, John Haldane, Paul Crittenden, Eamonn Callan, Joel J. Kupperman, Ben Spiecker & Kenneth A. Strike - 1999 - In David Carr & J. W. Steutel (eds.), Virtue Ethics and Moral Education. Routledge.
     
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  3. Virtue in Virtue Ethics.Joel J. Kupperman - 2009 - The Journal of Ethics 13 (2-3):243-255.
    This paper represents two polemics. One is against suggestions (made by Harman and others) that recent psychological research counts against any claim that there is such a thing as genuine virtue (Cf. Harman, in: Byrne, Stalnaker, Wedgwood (eds.) Fact and value, pp 117–127, 2001 ). The other is against the view that virtue ethics should be seen as competing against such theories as Kantian ethics or consequentialism, particularly in the specification of decision procedures.
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  4.  71
    Confucian civility.Joel J. Kupperman - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (1):11-23.
    A major reason that Confucius should matter to Western ethical philosophers is that some of his concerns are markedly different from those most common in the West. A Western emphasis has been on major choices that are treated in a decontextualized way. Confucius’ emphasis is on paths of life, so that context matters. Further, the nuances of personal relations get more attention than is common (with the exception of feminist ethics) in Western philosophy. What Confucius provides is a valuable aid (...)
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  5. Vulgar consequentialism.Joel J. Kupperman - 1980 - Mind 89 (355):321-337.
  6.  46
    Confucius and the problem of naturalness.Joel J. Kupperman - 1968 - Philosophy East and West 18 (3):175-185.
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  7.  30
    Ethical Knowledge.Joel J. Kupperman - 1970 - New York: Routledge.
    This volume is a comprehensive collection of critical essays on The Taming of the Shrew, and includes extensive discussions of the play's various printed versions and its theatrical productions. Aspinall has included only those essays that offer the most influential and controversial arguments surrounding the play. The issues discussed include gender, authority, female autonomy and unruliness, courtship and marriage, language and speech, and performance and theatricality.
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  8.  2
    The foundations of morality.Joel Kupperman - 1983 - Boston: Allen & Unwin.
  9. Tradition and Community in the Formation of Character and Self.Joel J. Kupperman - 2004 - In Kwong-loi Shun & David B. Wong (eds.), Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 103--123.
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  10.  52
    Why ethical philosophy needs to be comparative.Joel J. Kupperman - 2010 - Philosophy 85 (2):185-200.
    Principles can seem as entrenched in moral experience as Kant thinks space, time, and the categories are in human experience of the world. However not all cultures have such a view. Classical Indian and Chinese philosophies treat modification of the self as central to ethics. Decisions in particular cases and underlying principles are much less discussed. Ethics needs comparative philosophy in order not to be narrow in its concerns. A broader view can give weight to how people sometimes can change (...)
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  11.  25
    Why Ethical Philosophy Needs to Be Comparative.Joel J. Kupperman - 2010 - Philosophy 85 (2):185-200.
    Principles can seem as entrenched in moral experience as Kant thinks space, time, and the categories are in human experience of the world. However not all cultures have such a view. Classical Indian and Chinese philosophies treat modification of the self as central to ethics. Decisions in particular cases and underlying principles are much less discussed.Ethics needs comparative philosophy in order not to be narrow in its concerns. A broader view can give weight to how people sometimes can change who (...)
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  12.  67
    The epistemology of non-instrumental value.Joel J. Kupperman - 2005 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (3):659–680.
    Might there be knowledge of non-instrumental values? Arguments are give for two principal claims. One is that if there is such knowledge, it typically will have features that do not entirely match those of other kinds of knowledge. It will have a closer relation to the kind of person one is or becomes, and in the way it combines features of knowing-how with knowing-that. There also are problems of indeterminacy of non-instrumental value which are not commonly found in other things (...)
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  13.  18
    Dimensions of Moral Creativity: Paradigms, Principles, and Ideals.Joel J. Kupperman - 1980 - Philosophy East and West 30 (1):123-125.
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  14.  71
    An anti‐essentialist view of the emotions.Joel J. Kupperman - 1995 - Philosophical Psychology 8 (4):341-351.
    Emotions normally include elements of feeling, motivation, and also intentionality; but the argument of this essay is that there can be emotion without feeling, emotion without corresponding motivation, and emotion without an intentional relation to an object such that the emotion is (among other things) a belief about or construal of it. Many recent writers have claimed that some form of intentionality is essential to emotion, and then have created lines of defence for this thesis. Thus, what look like troublesome (...)
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  15.  49
    Moral realism and metaphysical anti-realism.Joel J. Kupperman - 1987 - Metaphilosophy 18 (2):95–107.
    The essay has two purposes. One is to point out connections and parallels between, On one hand, The debates of metaphysical realists and anti-Realists, And on the other hand, The debates surrounding moral realism. The second is to provide the outlines of a case for a kind of position that would generally be classified as moral realism. One feature of this position is that it emerges as parallel to, And compatible with, A metaphysical position that would generally be classified as (...)
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  16.  1
    The Foundations of Morality.Joel J. Kupperman - 1983 - Philosophy 60 (234):552-554.
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  17.  4
    Classical and sour forms of virtue.Joel J. Kupperman - 2007 - In Paul Bloomfield (ed.), Morality and Self-Interest. Oxford University Press.
    For the “respectable” part of society there can be a presumption of virtuousness, rather like the presumption of innocence in the law. In both cases, the presumption can be defeated, as we learn more and get into specifics. We still might insist that to be genuinely virtuous is to be able to pass the more familiar sorts of tests of virtue, and to be reliably virtuous also in the ordinary business of life, especially in things that really matter. Something like (...)
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  18.  9
    The Foundations of Morality.John Cottingham & Joel J. Kupperman - 1985 - British Journal of Educational Studies 33 (1):94.
  19.  29
    Comfort, hedonic treadmills, and public policy.Joel J. Kupperman - 2003 - Public Affairs Quarterly 17 (1):17-28.
  20.  35
    Ethics for Extraterrestrials.Joel J. Kupperman - 1991 - American Philosophical Quarterly 28 (4):311 - 320.
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  21.  28
    How values congeal into facts.Joel J. Kupperman - 2000 - Ratio 13 (1):37–53.
    The paper plays against the philosophical stereotype that facts are bits of reality, ‘furniture of the universe’, and that values in contrast are either mysterious bits of reality or responses to facts. It follows Strawson in regarding facts as interpretative constructs. Values also are interpretative constructs, characterized by a normal (but not universal) connection with motivations. So is there a deep difference? There is a sense of ‘facts’, marked by phrases such as ‘Stick to the facts’, in which the interpretative (...)
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  22.  7
    The Epistemology of Non‐Instrumental Value.Joel J. Kupperman - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (3):659-680.
    Might there be knowledge of non‐instrumental values? Arguments are give for two principal claims. One is that if there is such knowledge, it typically will have features that do not entirely match those of other kinds of knowledge. It will have a closer relation to the kind of person one is or becomes, and in the way it combines features of knowing‐how with knowing‐that. There also are problems of indeterminacy of non‐instrumental value which are not commonly found in other things (...)
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  23.  42
    A new look at the logic of the ‘is’-‘ought’ relation.Joel J. Kupperman - 2005 - Philosophy 80 (3):343-359.
    In the 1950's some prominent philosophers suggested a logical relation weaker than entailment between primarily descriptive statements and ethical conclusions. The paper revisits this suggestion. It examines four ways in which ethical statemnts can be supported by descriptions and evaluations. This provides a similarity bteween some kinds of reason-giving in ethics and familiar cases of logical inference, making it plausible to speak of a logic. The similarity however is limited, and the strength in ethics of descriptive reasons is never precise (...)
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  24. A Case For Consequentialism.Joel J. Kupperman - 1981 - American Philosophical Quarterly 18 (4):305-313.
  25.  98
    A messy derivation of the categorical imperative.Joel J. Kupperman - 2002 - Philosophy 77 (4):485-502.
    Here are two widespread responses to Kant's categorical imperative. On one hand, one might note the absence of detailed rational derivation. On the other hand, even someone who maintains some skepticism is likely to have a sense that (nevertheless) there is something to Kant's central ideas. The recommended solution is analysis of elements of the categorical imperative. Their appeal turns out to have different sources. One aspect of the first formulation rests on the logic of normative utterances. But others can (...)
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  26.  21
    For an Ontology of Morals: A Critique of Contemporary Ethical Theory.Joel J. Kupperman - 1973 - Philosophical Review 82 (2):244.
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  27.  18
    Nuance and ethical choice.Joel J. Kupperman - 1969 - Ethics 79 (2):105-114.
  28.  24
    The Emotions of Altruism, East and West.Joel J. Kupperman - 1995 - In Roger Ames, Robert C. Solomon & Joel Marks (eds.), Emotions in Asian Thought: A Dialogue in Comparative Philosophy. Suny Press. pp. 123.
  29.  56
    Three Rival Versions of Moral Enquiry: Encyclopaedia, Genealogy, and Tradition, by Alasdair MacIntyre. [REVIEW]Joel J. Kupperman - 1992 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 52 (3):737-740.
  30. Confucius and the nature of religious ethics.Joel J. Kupperman - 1971 - Philosophy East and West 21 (2):189-194.
  31.  6
    Living Options in World Philosophy.Joel J. Kupperman - 1978 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 9 (4):262-263.
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  32.  2
    Living Options in World Philosophy.Joel J. Kupperman - 1978 - Philosophy East and West 28 (2):234-235.
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  33.  19
    A New Look at the Logic of the - Relation.Joel J. Kupperman - 2005 - Philosophy 80 (3):343.
    In the 1950's some prominent philosophers suggested a logical relation weaker than entailment between primarily descriptive statements and ethical conclusions. The paper revisits this suggestion. It examines four ways in which ethical statemnts can be supported by descriptions and evaluations. This provides a similarity bteween some kinds of reason-giving in ethics and familiar cases of logical inference, making it plausible to speak of a logic. The similarity however is limited, and the strength in ethics of descriptive reasons is never precise (...)
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  34.  19
    Axiological Realism.Joel J. Kupperman - 1996 - Philosophy 71 (276):185 - 203.
    Many would consider the lengthening debate between moral realists and anti-realists to be draw-ish. Plainly new approaches are needed. Or might the issue, which most broadly concerns realism in relation to normative judgments, be broken down into parts or sectors? Physicists have been saying, in relation to a similarly longstanding debate, that light in some respects behaves like waves and in some respects like particles. Might realism be more plausible in relation to some kinds of normative judgments than others?
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  35.  18
    Ethical fallibility.Joel J. Kupperman - 1988 - Ratio 1 (1):33-46.
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  36.  63
    Art and aesthetic experience.Joel J. Kupperman - 1975 - British Journal of Aesthetics 15 (1):29-39.
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  37.  92
    Autonomy and the Very Limited Role of Advocacy in the Classroom.Joel J. Kupperman - 1996 - The Monist 79 (4):488-498.
    My thesis is that advocacy in the classroom is rarely appropriate with regard to live moral, political, or social issues, and for that matter not always appropriate with regard to issues within a discipline. By advocacy I mean a teacher's presenting a view as her or his own in a way that might well elicit students' agreement. My argument against advocacy is supported by two sets of assumptions. One concerns the aims of higher education. The other concerns a distinction between (...)
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  38.  48
    Axiological Realism.Joel J. Kupperman - 1996 - Philosophy 71 (276):185-203.
    Many would consider the lengthening debate between moral realists and anti-realists to be draw-ish. Plainly new approaches are needed. Or might the issue, which most broadly concerns realism in relation to normative judgments, be broken down into parts or sectors? Physicists have been saying, in relation to a similarly longstanding debate, that light in some respects behaves like waves and in some respects like particles. Might realism be more plausible in relation to some kinds of normative judgments than others?
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  39.  20
    Aesthetic Value.Joel J. Kupperman - 1972 - American Philosophical Quarterly 9 (3):259 - 264.
  40. Confucius, Mencius, Hume and Kant on reason and choice.Joel J. Kupperman - 1989 - In Shlomo Biderman & Ben-Ami Scharfstein (eds.), Rationality in Question: On Eastern and Western Views of Rationality. E.J. Brill. pp. 119--139.
  41.  28
    Chisholm's view of person and object.Joel J. Kupperman - 1979 - Metaphilosophy 10 (1):62–73.
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  42.  43
    Do we desire only pleasure?Joel J. Kupperman - 1978 - Philosophical Studies 34 (4):451 - 454.
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  43.  27
    Felt and unfelt emotions: A rejoinder to Dalgleish.Joel J. Kupperman - 1997 - Philosophical Psychology 10 (1):91.
  44.  14
    Francis Hutcheson: Morality and Nature.Joel J. Kupperman - 1985 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 2 (2):195 - 202.
  45.  34
    Half-truths.Joel J. Kupperman - 2012 - Ratio 25 (2):148-163.
    Half-truths are statements that have some insight or truth in them, but do not amount to a final or definitive truth that all competent judges should be able to accept. Complete truth requires that the relevant interpretative structures can be taken for granted, and can be expected to be understood by all competent language users. Disciplines such as philosophy, history, and sociology do contain a small number of complete truths, concerning some logical relations or such matters as the year of (...)
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  46.  2
    Half‐truths.Joel J. Kupperman - 2012 - Ratio 25 (2):148-163.
    Half‐truths are statements that have some insight or truth in them, but do not amount to a final or definitive truth that all competent judges should be able to accept. Complete truth requires that the relevant interpretative structures can be taken for granted, and can be expected to be understood by all competent language users. Disciplines such as philosophy, history, and sociology do contain a small number of complete truths, concerning some logical relations or such matters as the year of (...)
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  47.  4
    Human Nature: A Reader.Joel J. Kupperman (ed.) - 2012 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    This anthology provides a set of distinctive, influential views that explore the mysteries of human nature from a variety of perspectives. It can be read on its own, or in conjunction with Joel Kupperman’s text, _Theories of Human Nature_.
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  48.  16
    Investigations of the self.Joel J. Kupperman - 1984 - Philosophy East and West 34 (1):37-51.
  49.  23
    Is the Nature of Physical Reality Unknowable?Joel J. Kupperman - 1978 - American Philosophical Quarterly 15 (2):99 - 105.
  50.  52
    Not in so many words: Chuang Tzu's strategies of communication.Joel J. Kupperman - 1989 - Philosophy East and West 39 (3):311-317.
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