Results for 'Joel Chow Ken Q.'

996 found
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  1. On Not Blaming and Victim Blaming.Joel Chow Ken Q. & Robert H. Wallace - 2020 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 39 (3):95-128.
    In this paper we show that being blameworthy for not blaming and being blameworthy for victim blaming are structurally similar. Each involve the two traditional contours of moral responsibility: a knowledge condition and a control condition. But interestingly, in these cases knowledge and control are importantly interrelated. Being in a relationship with another person affords us varying degrees of knowledge about them. This knowledge in turn affords agents in relationships varying degrees of influence over one another. Cases where an agent (...)
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  2.  39
    The Internet and the Democratic Imagination: Deweyan Communication in the 21st Century.Joel Chow Ken Q. - 2013 - Contemporary Pragmatism 10 (2):49-78.
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  3.  94
    On Political Instrumentalism and the Justification of Democracy: Reply to Viehoff.Joel K. Q. Chow - 2018 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 118 (3):387-397.
  4.  9
    Equality, Bias, and the Right to an Equal Say.Joel K. Q. Chow - 2020 - Philosophia 48 (3):893-900.
    Thomas Christiano argues that democracies acquire a right to rule by being the unique embodiment of publicly accessible rules. Justice requires the equal advancement of the interests of all. However, due to the need for citizens to shape a common world despite disagreement and limitations of human cognition, publicity is a necessary constraint on the pursuit of justice. Given that democracy is necessary to secure public equality, democratic authority is thus justified, as democracy is the only political arrangement that satisfies (...)
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  5.  13
    Equality, Bias, and the Right to an Equal Say.Joel K. Q. Chow - 2020 - Philosophia 48 (3):893-900.
    Thomas Christiano argues that democracies acquire a right to rule by being the unique embodiment of publicly accessible rules. Justice requires the equal advancement of the interests of all. However, due to the need for citizens to shape a common world despite disagreement and limitations of human cognition, publicity is a necessary constraint on the pursuit of justice. Given that democracy is necessary to secure public equality, democratic authority is thus justified, as democracy is the only political arrangement that satisfies (...)
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  6.  39
    Normal and Defective Colour Vision.John D. Mollon, Joel Pokorny & Ken Knoblauch (eds.) - 2003 - Oxford University Press UK.
    The topic of colour vision is one that integrates research from psychology, neuroscience, biology, ophthalmology, physics, and genetics. How do we make sense of colour in the world, and how has such an ability evolved in humans? How does the brain interpret colour images? Do men discriminate colours differently from women? Why do some people have problems perceiving colours? Mollon, Pokorny, and Knoblauch are leading authorities on this topic, and together they have brought together a stellar list of contributors, encompassing (...)
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  7. Validating neural correlates of familiarity.Ken A. Paller, Joel L. Voss & Stephan G. Boehm - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (6):243-250.
  8.  80
    Assuming too much from ‘familiar’ brain potentials.Ken A. Paller, Heather D. Lucas & Joel L. Voss - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (6):313-315.
  9.  8
    Bottom-up processes dominate early word recognition in toddlers.Janette Chow, Armando Q. Angulo-Chavira, Marlene Spangenberg, Leonie Hentrup & Kim Plunkett - 2022 - Cognition 228 (C):105214.
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  10.  20
    Political Philosophy and Political Persuasion.Joel Chow - 2020 - Australasian Philosophical Review 4 (1):80-86.
    ABSTRACT Avner de Shalit argues that political philosophy centrally involves political persuasion, defined as a process of mutual empathy that involves more than just providing rationales or normative arguments. Building upon this idea of political persuasion as mutual empathy, de Shalit thinks that to engage the public, philosophers need to examine problems from the public’s perspective, and not a perspective unique to their professional group. In this paper, I argue that de Shalit’s conception of political persuasion is overly narrow. In (...)
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  11.  3
    Coal and Natural Gas: Fuel and Environmental Policy in Pittsburgh and Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, 1940-1960.Ken Koons, Gary David Goodman & Joel A. Tarr - 1980 - Science, Technology and Human Values 5 (3):19-21.
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  12.  14
    Dopaminergic Therapy Increases Go Timeouts in the Go/No-Go Task in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease.Xue Q. Yang, Brian Lauzon, Ken N. Seergobin & Penny A. MacDonald - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11.
  13.  46
    An Epistemic Reduction of Contrastive Knowledge Claims.Joel Buenting - 2010 - Social Epistemology 24 (2):99-104.
    Contrastive epistemologists say knowledge displays the ternary relation “S knows p rather than q”. I argue that “S knows p rather than q” is often equivalent to “S knows p rather than not-p” and hence equivalent to “S knows p”. The result is that contrastive knowledge is often binary knowledge disguised.
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  14. Fikrī taḥrīken̲.Saʻīd Aḥmad Rafīq - 2007 - Koʼiṭah: Sol ejanṭ, Qalāt Pablisharz.
    Historical study of philosophical movements from ancient times to 19th century.
     
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  15.  96
    A simple maximality principle.Joel David Hamkins - 2003 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 68 (2):527-550.
    In this paper, following an idea of Christophe Chalons. I propose a new kind of forcing axiom, the Maximality Principle, which asserts that any sentence varphi holding in some forcing extension $V^P$ and all subsequent extensions $V^{P\ast Q}$ holds already in V. It follows, in fact, that such sentences must also hold in all forcing extensions of V. In modal terms, therefore, the Maximality Principle is expressed by the scheme $(\lozenge \square \varphi) \Rightarrow \square \varphi$ , and is equivalent to (...)
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  16.  96
    A new theory of content I: Basic content. [REVIEW]Ken Gemes - 1994 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 23 (6):595 - 620.
    Philosophers of science as divergent as the inductivist Carnap and the deductivist Popper share the notion that the (logical) content of a proposition is given by its consequence class. I claim that this notion of content is (a) unintuitive and (b) inappropriate for many of the formal needs of philosophers of science. The basic problem is that given this notion of content, for any arbitrary p and q, [(p ∨ q)] will count as part of the content of both p (...)
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  17.  35
    Superstrong and other large cardinals are never Laver indestructible.Joan Bagaria, Joel David Hamkins, Konstantinos Tsaprounis & Toshimichi Usuba - 2016 - Archive for Mathematical Logic 55 (1-2):19-35.
    Superstrong cardinals are never Laver indestructible. Similarly, almost huge cardinals, huge cardinals, superhuge cardinals, rank-into-rank cardinals, extendible cardinals, 1-extendible cardinals, 0-extendible cardinals, weakly superstrong cardinals, uplifting cardinals, pseudo-uplifting cardinals, superstrongly unfoldable cardinals, Σn-reflecting cardinals, Σn-correct cardinals and Σn-extendible cardinals are never Laver indestructible. In fact, all these large cardinal properties are superdestructible: if κ exhibits any of them, with corresponding target θ, then in any forcing extension arising from nontrivial strategically <κ-closed forcing Q∈Vθ\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} (...)
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  18.  21
    Subspaces of $${\mathbb{Q}}$$ whose d-logics do not have the FMP.Guram Bezhanishvili & Joel Lucero-Bryan - 2012 - Archive for Mathematical Logic 51 (5-6):661-670.
    We show that subspaces of the space ${\mathbb{Q}}$ of rational numbers give rise to uncountably many d-logics over K4 without the finite model property.
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  19.  16
    Succinct definitions in the first order theory of graphs.Oleg Pikhurko, Joel Spencer & Oleg Verbitsky - 2006 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 139 (1):74-109.
    We say that a first order sentence A defines a graph G if A is true on G but false on any graph non-isomorphic to G. Let L ) denote the minimum length of such a sentence. We define the succinctness function s ) to be the minimum L ) over all graphs on n vertices.We prove that s and q may be so small that for no general recursive function f we can have f)≥n for all n. However, for (...))
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  20.  34
    Obligation as Optimal Goal Satisfaction.Robert Kowalski & Ken Satoh - 2018 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 47 (4):579-609.
    Formalising deontic concepts, such as obligation, prohibition and permission, is normally carried out in a modal logic with a possible world semantics, in which some worlds are better than others. The main focus in these logics is on inferring logical consequences, for example inferring that the obligation O q is a logical consequence of the obligations O p and O. In this paper we propose a non-modal approach in which obligations are preferred ways of satisfying goals expressed in first-order logic. (...)
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  21.  39
    More on d-Logics of Subspaces of the Rational Numbers.Guram Bezhanishvili & Joel Lucero-Bryan - 2012 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 53 (3):319-345.
    We prove that each countable rooted K4 -frame is a d-morphic image of a subspace of the space $\mathbb{Q}$ of rational numbers. From this we derive that each modal logic over K4 axiomatizable by variable-free formulas is the d-logic of a subspace of $\mathbb{Q}$ . It follows that subspaces of $\mathbb{Q}$ give rise to continuum many d-logics over K4 , continuum many of which are neither finitely axiomatizable nor decidable. In addition, we exhibit several families of modal logics finitely axiomatizable (...)
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  22.  30
    Ehrenfeucht’s Lemma in Set Theory.Gunter Fuchs, Victoria Gitman & Joel David Hamkins - 2018 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 59 (3):355-370.
    Ehrenfeucht’s lemma asserts that whenever one element of a model of Peano arithmetic is definable from another, they satisfy different types. We consider here the analogue of Ehrenfeucht’s lemma for models of set theory. The original argument applies directly to the ordinal-definable elements of any model of set theory, and, in particular, Ehrenfeucht’s lemma holds fully for models of set theory satisfying V=HOD. We show that the lemma fails in the forcing extension of the universe by adding a Cohen real. (...)
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  23. How blue is blue? : the metaphysics of the blues. Talkin' to myself again : a dialogue on the evolution of the blues / Joel Rudinow ; Reclaiming the aura : B.B. King in the age of mechanical reproduction / Ken Ueno ; Twelve-bar zombies : Wittgensteinian reflections on the blues / Wade Fox and Richard Greene ; The blues as cultural expression. [REVIEW]Philip Jenkins - 2012 - In Jesse R. Steinberg & Abrol Fairweather (eds.), Blues -- Philosophy for Everyone: Thinking Deep About Feeling Low. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  24. To what extent can institutional control explain the dominance of analytic philosophy?Joel Katzav - 2023 - Asian Journal of Philosophy 2 (45):1-14.
    Katzav and Vaesen have argued that control by analytic philosophers of key journals, philosophy departments and at least one funding body plays a substantial role in explaining the emergence of analytic philosophy into dominance in the Anglophone world and the corresponding decline of speculative philosophy. They also argued that this use of control suggests a characterisation of analytic philosophy as, at the institutional level, a sectarian form of critical philosophy. I test these hypotheses against data about philosophy job hires at (...)
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  25. The Who and the How of Experience.Joel Krueger - 2011 - In Mark Siderits, Evan Thompson & Dan Zahavi (eds.), Self, no self?: perspectives from analytical, phenomenological, and Indian traditions. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 27-55.
  26.  6
    Race, Gender, and Memes: Reactive Blackness and Teaching the Eighteenth Century.Jeremy Chow - 2022 - Lumen: Selected Proceedings From the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies 41:157-181.
    Cet article, où s’entremêlent pédagogie, réflexion et synthèse critique, se propose d’évaluer un exercice mené dans le cadre d’un séminaire aux cycles supérieurs sur « La race et le genre au dix-huitième siècle » : le musée du mème. Ce musée se sert des réactions publiées dans les médias sociaux dans le but d’orienter la lecture et les impressions des étudiant.e.s à l’égard de la littérature du dix-huitième siècle. Le musée du mème suscite inéluctablement une sorte de « blackface numérique (...)
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  27.  12
    Nineteenth-century American literature and the discourse of natural history.Juliana Chow - 2021 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    American cultural technologies of the early nineteenth century shaped Nature and the synonymous "native" in contradictory ways: celebrating the wilderness but then transforming it by cultivation, mourning lost "natives" (both people and species) while also naturalizing the succession of new Euro-American settlers. Settler colonial geopolitics understood its own territorial claims in association with the retreats, migrations, and expansions of select species populations: cattle replacing American bison or Euro-Americans replacing Indians on the western frontier. In this way, Euro-American descendants of settlers (...)
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  28. Speculative Philosophy of Science vs. Logical Positivism: Preliminary Round.Joel Katzav - manuscript
    I outline the theoretical framework of, and three research programs within American speculative philosophy of science during the period 1900-1931. One program applies verificationism to research in psychology, one investigates the methodology of research programs, and one analyses scientific explanation and other scientific concepts. The primary sources for my outline are works by Morris Raphael Cohen, Grace Andrus de Laguna, Theodore de Laguna, Edgar Arthur Singer Jr., Harold Robert Smart, and Marie Collins Swabey. I also use my outline to provide (...)
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  29.  11
    GenAI Model Security.Ken Huang, Ben Goertzel, Daniel Wu & Anita Xie - 2024 - In Ken Huang, Yang Wang, Ben Goertzel, Yale Li, Sean Wright & Jyoti Ponnapalli (eds.), Generative AI Security: Theories and Practices. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 163-198.
    Safeguarding GenAI models against threats and aligning them with security requirements is imperative yet challenging. This chapter provides an overview of the security landscape for generative models. It begins by elucidating common vulnerabilities and attack vectors, including adversarial attacks, model inversion, backdoors, data extraction, and algorithmic bias. The practical implications of these threats are discussed, spanning domains like finance, healthcare, and content creation. The narrative then shifts to exploring mitigation strategies and innovative security paradigms. Differential privacy, blockchain-based provenance, quantum-resistant algorithms, (...)
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  30.  9
    Libertarianism without alternative possibilities.Joël Dolbeault - forthcoming - Metaphilosophy.
    In the contemporary debate on free will, most philosophers assume that the defense of libertarianism implies the defense of the notion of alternative possibilities. This article discusses this presupposition by showing that it is possible to build a libertarianism without alternative possibilities, apparently more robust than libertarianism with alternative possibilities. Inspired by Bergson, this nonclassical libertarianism challenges the idea that all causation implies the actualization of a predetermined possibility (an idea shared by determinism and classical libertarianism). Moreover, it challenges the (...)
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  31. Emotions and Other Minds.Joel Krueger - 2014 - In Rudiger Campe & Julia Weber (eds.), Interiority/Exteriority: Rethinking Emotion. Walter de Gruyter. pp. 324-350.
  32. Nietzsche on Free Will, Autonomy and the Sovereign Individual.Ken Gemes - 2009 - In Ken Gemes & Simon May (eds.), Nietzsche on freedom and autonomy. New York: Oxford University Press.
  33. Grace de Laguna’s Analytic and Speculative Philosophy.Joel Katzav - 2022 - Australasian Philosophical Review 6 (1):6-25.
    This paper introduces the philosophy of Grace Andrus de Laguna in order to renew interest in it. I show that, in the 1910s and 1920s, she develops ideas and arguments that are also found playing key roles in the development of analytic philosophy decades later. Further, I describe her sympathetic, but acute, criticism of pragmatism and Heideggerian ontology, and situate her work in the tradition of American, speculative philosophy. Before 1920, we will see, de Laguna appeals to multiple realizability to (...)
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  34. Nietzsche on freedom and autonomy.Ken Gemes & Simon May (eds.) - 2009 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    The principal aim of this volume is to elucidate what freedom, sovereignty, and autonomy mean for Nietzsche and what philosophical resources he gives us to re ...
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  35. Real feeling and fictional time in human-AI interactions.Krueger Joel & Tom Roberts - forthcoming - Topoi.
    As technology improves, artificial systems are increasingly able to behave in human-like ways: holding a conversation; providing information, advice, and support; or taking on the role of therapist, teacher, or counsellor. This enhanced behavioural complexity, we argue, encourages deeper forms of affective engagement on the part of the human user, with the artificial agent helping to stabilise, subdue, prolong, or intensify a person's emotional condition. Here, we defend a fictionalist account of human/AI interaction, according to which these encounters involve an (...)
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  36. Grace de Laguna’s 1909 Critique of Analytic Philosophy: Presentation and Defence.Joel Katzav - 2023 - Asian Journal of Philosophy 2 (2):1-26.
    Grace A. de Laguna was an American philosopher of exceptional originality. Many of the arguments and positions she developed during the early decades of the twentieth century later came to be central to analytic philosophy. These arguments and positions included, even before 1930, a critique of the analytic-synthetic distinction, a private language argument, a critique of type physicalism, a functionalist theory of mind, a critique of scientific reductionism, a methodology of research programs in science and more. Nevertheless, de Laguna identified (...)
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  37. Is Descartes a Temporal Atomist?Ken Levy - 2005 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (4):627 – 674.
    I argue that Descartes' Second Causal Proof of God in the Third Meditation evidences, and commits him to, the belief that time is "strongly discontinuous" -- that is, that there is actually a gap between each consecutive moment of time. Much of my article attempts to reconcile this interpretation, the "received view," with Descartes' statements about time, space, and matter in his other writings, including his correspondence with various philosophers.
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  38. Ethical Extensionism Defended.Joel MacClellan - 2024 - Between the Species 27 (1):140-178.
    Ethical extensionism is a common argument pattern in environmental and animal ethics, which takes a morally valuable trait already recognized in us and argues that we should recognize that value in other entities such as nonhuman animals. I exposit ethical extensionism’s core argument, argue for its validity and soundness, and trace its history to 18th century progressivist calls to expand the moral community and legal franchise. However, ethical extensionism has its critics. The bulk of the paper responds to recent criticisms, (...)
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  39.  22
    Lectures on the philosophy of mathematics.Joel David Hamkins - 2020 - Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press.
    An introduction to the philosophy of mathematics grounded in mathematics and motivated by mathematical inquiry and practice. In this book, Joel David Hamkins offers an introduction to the philosophy of mathematics that is grounded in mathematics and motivated by mathematical inquiry and practice. He treats philosophical issues as they arise organically in mathematics, discussing such topics as platonism, realism, logicism, structuralism, formalism, infinity, and intuitionism in mathematical contexts. He organizes the book by mathematical themes--numbers, rigor, geometry, proof, computability, incompleteness, (...)
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  40.  8
    The religion of tomorrow: a vision for the future of the great traditions--more inclusive, more comprehensive, more complete.Ken Wilber - 2017 - Boulder: Shambhala.
    A provocative examination of how the great religious traditions can remain relevant in modern times by incorporating scientific truths learned about human nature over the last century A single purpose lies at the heart of all the great religious traditions: awakening to the astonishing reality of the true nature of ourselves and the universe. At the same time, through centuries of cultural accretion and focus on myth and ritual as ends in themselves, this core insight has become obscured. Here, Ken (...)
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  41. Towards a wide approach to improvisation.Joel Krueger & Alessandro Salice - 2021 - In J. McGuirk, S. Ravn & S. Høffding (eds.), Improvisation: The Competence(s) of Not Being in Control. Routledge.
    This paper pursues two main aims. First, it distinguishes two kinds of improvisation: expert and inexpert. Expert improvisation is a (usually artistic) practice that the agent consciously sets as their goal and is evaluated according to (usually artistic) standards of improvisation. Inexpert improvisation, by contrast, supports and structures the agent’s action as it moves them towards their (usually everyday life) goals and is evaluated on its success leading the agent to the achievement of those goals. The second aim is to (...)
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  42. Possibilities Of Which I Am: Disability, Embodiment, and Existentialism.Joel Michael Reynolds - 2024 - In Kevin Aho, Megan Altman & Hans Pedersen (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Contemporary Existentialism. Routledge.
    Drawing upon the life and work of S. Kay Toombs, I explore the impact and import of phenomenological accounts of disability for the existentialist tradition. Through the case of multiple sclerosis, a noncongenital, late-onset, and degenerative disability, I show how the general structures that emerge from its lived experience largely support a mere-difference view of disability and highlight the need for an equitably habitable world. I further argue that phenomenological accounts of disability demonstrate accessibility to be the defining feature of (...)
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  43.  92
    Selves beyond the skin: Watsuji, “betweenness”, and self-loss in solitary confinement and dementia.Joel Krueger - forthcoming - Journal of Consciousness Studies.
    I develop Tetsurō Watsuji’s relational model of the self as “betweenness”. I argue that Watsuji’s view receives support from two case studies: solitary confinement and dementia. Both clarify the constitutive interdependence between the self and the social and material contexts of “betweenness” that define its lifeworld. They do so by providing powerful examples of what happens when the support and regulative grounding of this lifeworld is restricted or taken away. I argue further that Watsuji’s view helps see the other side (...)
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  44.  62
    Nietzsche.Ken Gemes & Christoph Schuringa - 2012 - In Tom P. S. Angier (ed.), Ethics: the key thinkers. London: Bloomsbury Academic.
    Nietzsche never presented a worked-out normative ethical theory and appeared to regard any attempt to do so as woefully misguided. He poured scorn on the main contenders for such a theory in his day, and in ours – Kantian ethics and utilitarianism. Moreover, he repeatedly referred to himself as an 'immoralist' and gave one of his books the title Beyond Good and Evil, thus seeming only to confirm the impression that he was more interested in demolishing, and even abolishing morality (...)
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  45.  56
    Gadamer's Hermeneutics: A Reading of Truth and Method.Joel Weinsheimer - 1985
    Since the publication of Wahrheit und Methode in 1960 (Tfibingen), Gadamer's hermeneutics has called forth a varied and fruitful response from the Continent, without receiving anything near the same attention from the English-speaking world. Though E. D. Hirsch thought Gadamer sufficiently important in 1965 to merit an early rebuttal and rehabilitation (Validity in Interpretation [New Haven, Conn., 1967], pp. 245-64), Wahrheit und Methode remained unread in England and America, partly because a translation was not available until 1975 (Truth and Method, (...)
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  46.  7
    A face drawn in sand: humanistic study and Foucault in the present.Rey Chow - 2021 - New York: Columbia University Press.
    At its proper and most radical, humanistic inquiry is about problems that do not have ready solutions. If this fundamental feature had been accepted, debates about the humanities in recent years might have taken a different kind of turn, whereby, instead of appending new and ever more purposeful modifiers to the word humanities--the digital, the environmental, the neuro, the medical, the public--the ways in which humanistic modes of intellectual labor operate could have assumed a more central focus. This would not (...)
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  47.  51
    A purely geometric module in the rat's spatial representation.Ken Cheng - 1986 - Cognition 23 (2):149-178.
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  48. Agency, Environmental Scaffolding, and the Development of Eating Disorders - Commentary on Rodemeyer.Joel Krueger & Lucy Osler - 2020 - In Christian Tewes & Giovanni Stanghellini (eds.), Time and Body: Phenomenological and Psychopathological Approaches. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. pp. 256-262.
  49.  40
    Is Biocentrism Dead? Two Live Problems for Life-Centered Ethics.Joel MacClellan - forthcoming - Journal of Value Inquiry:1-22.
    Biocentrism, a prominent view in environmental ethics, is the notion that all and only individual biological organisms have moral status, which is to say that their good ought to be considered for its own sake by moral agents. I argue that biocentrism suffers two serious problems: the Origin Problem and the Normativity Problem. Biocentrism seeks to avoid the absurdity that artifacts have moral status on the basis that organisms have naturalistic origins whereas artifacts do not. The Origin Problem contends that, (...)
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  50. The child's right to an open future.Joel Feinberg - 2006 - In Randall Curren (ed.), Philosophy of Education: An Anthology. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
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