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  1.  12
    Consolation of Philosophy. Boethius & Joel C. Relihan - 2001 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    Entirely faithful to Boethius' Latin; Relihan's translation makes the philosophy of the Consolation intelligible to readers; it gives equal weight to the poetry--in fact, Relihan's metrical translation of Boethius' _metro_ are themselves contributions of the first moment to Boethian studies. Boethius finally has a translator equal to his prodigious talents and his manifold vision. --Joseph Pucci, Brown University.
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  2.  36
    The Prisoner's Philosophy: Life and Death in Boethius's Consolation.Joel C. Relihan - 2006 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    The Roman philosopher Boethius is best known for the _Consolation of Philosophy_, one of the most frequently cited texts in medieval literature. In the _Consolation_, an unnamed Boethius sits in prison awaiting execution when his muse Philosophy appears to him. Her offer to teach him who he truly is and to lead him to his heavenly home becomes a debate about how to come to terms with evil, freedom, and providence. The conventional reading of the _Consolation_ is that it is (...)
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  3.  20
    PAPERS ON APULEIUS - Keulen, Egelhaaf-Gaiser Aspects of Apuleius' Golden Ass. Volume III: The Isis Book. A Collection of Original Papers. Pp. Xvi + 255, Ills. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2012. Cased, €105, US$144. ISBN: 978-90-04-22123-9. [REVIEW]Joel C. Relihan - 2014 - The Classical Review 64 (2):474-476.
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  4.  13
    Boethius Marenbon The Cambridge Companion to Boethius. Pp. Xvi + 356. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009. Paper, £18.99, US$32.99 . ISBN: 978-0-521-69425-4. [REVIEW]Joel C. Relihan - 2011 - The Classical Review 61 (1):162-164.
  5.  13
    A Metrical Quotation in Julian's Symposium.Joel C. Relihan - 1989 - Classical Quarterly 39 (02):566-.
    So the modern editions print the opening words of the work more popularly known as the Caesares. The Symposium begins with what I consider to be a playful encounter between the narrator and his interlocutor, in which the latter's expectations of seriousness in the myth which is to follow are frustrated. This playfulness has not been appreciated by Julian's commentators. I suggest that we have here a concealed trimeter which figures largely in the dynamics of this dialogue : γελοον οδν (...)
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    Fulgentius, Mitologiae 1.20-21.Joel C. Relihan - 1988 - American Journal of Philology 109 (2).
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