Results for 'Joel Ballivian'

1000+ found
Order:
See also
Joel Ballivian
Western Michigan University
  1.  40
    Fine-Tuning Arguments and Biological Design Arguments: Can the Theist Have Both?Joel Ballivian - forthcoming - Religious Studies:1-7.
    There are at least two kinds of design arguments for theism: fine-tuning arguments and biological design arguments. Dougherty and Poston have argued that the success of one requires the failure of the other, and vice versa. The reason is that the success of these arguments hinges on the following crucial probability: the probability that biological life exists somewhere in the universe given that our universe is finely tuned and that biological development is unguided by intelligence. According to Dougherty and Poston, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  38
    Joel Hildebrand.Joel Hildebrand - 1972 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 16 (1):88-111.
  3.  72
    Omnipotence or Fusion? A Conversation Between Axel Honneth and Joel Whitebook.Axel Honneth & Joel Whitebook - 2016 - Constellations 23 (2):170-179.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  4. The Set-Theoretic Multiverse.Joel David Hamkins - 2012 - Review of Symbolic Logic 5 (3):416-449.
    The multiverse view in set theory, introduced and argued for in this article, is the view that there are many distinct concepts of set, each instantiated in a corresponding set-theoretic universe. The universe view, in contrast, asserts that there is an absolute background set concept, with a corresponding absolute set-theoretic universe in which every set-theoretic question has a definite answer. The multiverse position, I argue, explains our experience with the enormous range of set-theoretic possibilities, a phenomenon that challenges the universe (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   73 citations  
  5.  43
    Axiological Realism: Joel J. Kupperman.Joel J. Kupperman - 1996 - Philosophy 71 (276):185-203.
    Many would consider the lengthening debate between moral realists and anti-realists to be draw-ish. Plainly new approaches are needed. Or might the issue, which most broadly concerns realism in relation to normative judgments, be broken down into parts or sectors? Physicists have been saying, in relation to a similarly longstanding debate, that light in some respects behaves like waves and in some respects like particles. Might realism be more plausible in relation to some kinds of normative judgments than others?
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  21
    Why Ethical Philosophy Needs to Be Comparative: Joel J. Kupperman.Joel J. Kupperman - 2010 - Philosophy 85 (2):185-200.
    Principles can seem as entrenched in moral experience as Kant thinks space, time, and the categories are in human experience of the world. However not all cultures have such a view. Classical Indian and Chinese philosophies treat modification of the self as central to ethics. Decisions in particular cases and underlying principles are much less discussed. Ethics needs comparative philosophy in order not to be narrow in its concerns. A broader view can give weight to how people sometimes can change (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7.  7
    Reason and Responsibility Readings in Some Basic Problems of Philosophy /Edited by Joel Feinberg. --. --.Joel Feinberg - 1981 - Wadsworth Pub. Co., C1981.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  1
    Adaptations and Innovations: Studies on the Interaction Between Jewish and Islamic Thought and Literature From the Early Middle Ages to the Late Twentieth Century, Dedicated to Professor Joel L. Kraemer.Joel L. Kraemer, Y. Tzvi Langermann & Jossi Stern (eds.) - 2007 - Peeters.
    The interconnections, common interests, and other linkages between the Jewish and Islamic traditions have long been a matter of interest to academics. Today the need to understand these relationships, and to emphasize commonalities rather than conflicts, is of the greatest public interest. The present volume of studies, likely the first such collection in the scholarly literature, explores the full range of interconnections between Jews and Muslims in all fields (intellectual history, religion, philosophy, social history, etc.) and in all periods, from (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Is the Dream Solution of the Continuum Hypothesis Attainable?Joel David Hamkins - 2015 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 56 (1):135-145.
    The dream solution of the continuum hypothesis would be a solution by which we settle the continuum hypothesis on the basis of a newly discovered fundamental principle of set theory, a missing axiom, widely regarded as true. Such a dream solution would indeed be a solution, since we would all accept the new axiom along with its consequences. In this article, however, I argue that such a dream solution to $\mathrm {CH}$ is unattainable.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  10.  28
    Music-Animated Body. Interview with Joel Krueger.Joel Krueger - 2011 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 2 (1).
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Joel Feinberg and the Justification of Hard Paternalism.Richard J. Arneson - 2005 - Legal Theory 11 (3):259-284.
    Joel Feinberg was a brilliant philosopher whose work in social and moral philosophy is a legacy of excellent, even stunning achievement. Perhaps his most memorable achievement is his four-volume treatise on The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law, and perhaps the most striking jewel in this crowning achievement is his passionate and deeply insightful treatment of paternalism.1 Feinberg opposes Legal Paternalism, the doctrine that “it is always a good reason in support of a [criminal law] prohibition that it is (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   45 citations  
  12.  78
    Infinite Time Turing Machines.Joel David Hamkins & Andy Lewis - 2000 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 65 (2):567-604.
    Infinite time Turing machines extend the operation of ordinary Turing machines into transfinite ordinal time. By doing so, they provide a natural model of infinitary computability, a theoretical setting for the analysis of the power and limitations of supertask algorithms.
    Direct download (19 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  13. Intuition.Joel Pust - 2017 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This entry addresses the nature and epistemological role of intuition by considering the following questions: (1) What are intuitions?, (2) What roles do they serve in philosophical (and other “armchair”) inquiry?, (3) Ought they serve such roles?, (4) What are the implications of the empirical investigation of intuitions for their proper roles?, and (5) What is the content of intuitions prompted by the consideration of hypothetical cases?
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   42 citations  
  14. Intuitions as Evidence.Joel Pust - 2000 - Routledge.
    This book is concerned with the role of intuitions in the justification of philosophical theory. The author begins by demonstrating how contemporary philosophers, whether engaged in case-driven analysis or seeking reflective equilibrium, rely on intuitions as evidence for their theories. The author then provides an account of the nature of philosophical intuitions and distinguishes them from other psychological states. Finally, the author defends the use of intuitions as evidence by demonstrating that arguments for skepticism about their evidential value are either (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   89 citations  
  15.  52
    Mental Imagery: Functional Mechanisms and Clinical Applications.Joel Pearson, Thomas Naselaris, Emily A. Holmes & Stephen M. Kosslyn - 2015 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (10):590-602.
  16. Seeing Other People.Joel Smith - 2010 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 81 (3):731-748.
    I present a perceptual account of other minds that combines a Husserlian insight about perceptual experience with a functionalist account of mental properties.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   80 citations  
  17. The Phenomenology of Face‐to‐Face Mindreading.Joel Smith - 2015 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 90 (2):274-293.
    I defend a perceptual account of face-to-face mindreading. I begin by proposing a phenomenological constraint on our visual awareness of others' emotional expressions. I argue that to meet this constraint we require a distinction between the basic and non-basic ways people, and other things, look. I offer and defend just such an account.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  18. Autonomy, Vulnerability, Recognition, and Justice.Joel Anderson & Axel Honneth - 2005 - In John Christman & Joel Anderson (eds.), Autonomy and the Challenges to Liberalism: New Essays. New York: pp. 127-149.
    One of liberalism’s core commitments is to safeguarding individuals’ autonomy. And a central aspect of liberal social justice is the commitment to protecting the vulnerable. Taken together, and combined with an understanding of autonomy as an acquired set of capacities to lead one’s own life, these commitments suggest that liberal societies should be especially concerned to address vulnerabilities of individuals regarding the development and maintenance of their autonomy. In this chapter, we develop an account of what it would mean for (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   73 citations  
  19.  18
    The Relation Between Linguistic Structure and Associative Theories of Language Learning—A Constructive Critique of Some Connectionist Learning Models.Joel Lachter & Thomas G. Bever - 1988 - Cognition 28 (1-2):195-247.
  20. Dutch Books and Logical Form.Joel Pust - 2021 - Philosophy of Science 88 (5):961-970.
    Dutch Book Arguments (DBAs) have been invoked to support various requirements of rationality. Some are plausible: probabilism and conditionalization. Others are less so: credal transparency and reflection. Anna Mahtani has argued for a new understanding of DBAs which, she claims, allow us to keep the DBAs for probabilism (and perhaps conditionalization) and reject the DBAs for credal transparency and reflection. I argue that Mahtani’s new account fails as (a) it does not support highly plausible requirements of rational coherence and (b) (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  21.  11
    Strongly Uplifting Cardinals and the Boldface Resurrection Axioms.Joel David Hamkins & Thomas A. Johnstone - 2017 - Archive for Mathematical Logic 56 (7-8):1115-1133.
    We introduce the strongly uplifting cardinals, which are equivalently characterized, we prove, as the superstrongly unfoldable cardinals and also as the almost-hugely unfoldable cardinals, and we show that their existence is equiconsistent over ZFC with natural instances of the boldface resurrection axiom, such as the boldface resurrection axiom for proper forcing.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  22. Measurement in Psychology: A Critical History of a Methodological Concept.Joel Michell - 1999 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book traces how such a seemingly immutable idea as measurement proved so malleable when it collided with the subject matter of psychology. It locates philosophical and social influences reshaping the concept and, at the core of this reshaping, identifies a fundamental problem: the issue of whether psychological attributes really are quantitative. It argues that the idea of measurement now endorsed within psychology actually subverts attempts to establish a genuinely quantitative science and it urges a new direction. It relates views (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  23. A Theory of Emotion.Joel Marks - 1982 - Philosophical Studies 42 (1):227-242.
    I argue that emotions are belief/desire sets characterized by strong desire.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   71 citations  
  24.  63
    Probabilistic Coherence and Proper Scoring Rules.Joel Predd, Robert Seiringer, Elliott Lieb, Daniel Osherson, H. Vincent Poor & Sanjeev Kulkarni - 2009 - IEEE Transactions on Information Theory 55 (10):4786-4792.
    We provide self-contained proof of a theorem relating probabilistic coherence of forecasts to their non-domination by rival forecasts with respect to any proper scoring rule. The theorem recapitulates insights achieved by other investigators, and clarifi es the connection of coherence and proper scoring rules to Bregman divergence.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   55 citations  
  25. Two Visual Systems and Two Theories of Perception: An Attempt to Reconcile the Constructivist and Ecological Approaches.Joel Norman - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):73-96.
    The two contrasting theoretical approaches to visual perception, the constructivist and the ecological, are briefly presented and illustrated through their analyses of space and size perception. Earlier calls for their reconciliation and unification are reviewed. Neurophysiological, neuropsychological, and psychophysical evidence for the existence of two quite distinct visual systems, the ventral and the dorsal, is presented. These two perceptual systems differ in their functions; the ventral system's central function is that of identification, while the dorsal system is mainly engaged in (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  26.  10
    In Contradiction, A Study of the Transconsistent.Joel M. Smith - 1991 - Noûs 25 (3):380-383.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   93 citations  
  27.  12
    Ethics and Qualities of Life.Joel Kupperman - 2007 - Oup Usa.
    Ethics and Qualities of Life looks at what enters into ethical judgment and choice. Interpretation of a case and of what the options are is always a factor, as is a sense of the possible values at stake. Intuitions also enter in, but often are unreliable. For a long time it seemed only fair that oldest sons inherited, and struck few people as unfair that women were not allowed to attend universities. A moral judgment is putatively part of a moral (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  28.  35
    Offense to Others.Joel Feinberg - 1984 - Oxford University Press USA.
    The second volume in Joel Feinberg's series The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law, Offense to Others focuses on the "offense principle," which maintains that preventing shock, disgust, or revulsion is always a morally relevant reason for legal prohibitions. Feinberg clarifies the concept of an "offended mental state" and further contrasts the concept of offense with harm. He also considers the law of nuisance as a model for statutes creating "morals offenses," showing its inadequacy as a model for understanding (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  29. What Would Socrates Do?: Self-Examination, Civic Engagement, and the Politics of Philosophy.Joel Alden Schlosser - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    Socrates continues to be an extremely influential force to this day; his work is featured prominently in the work of contemporary thinkers ranging from Hannah Arendt and Leo Strauss, to Michel Foucault and Jacques Rancière. Intervening in this discussion, What Would Socrates Do? reconstructs Socrates' philosophy in ancient Athens to show its promise of empowering citizens and non-citizens alike. By drawing them into collective practices of dialogue and reflection, philosophy can help people to become thinking, acting beings more capable of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  30.  83
    Photography, Vision, and Representation.Joel Snyder & Neil Walsh Allen - 1975 - Critical Inquiry 2 (1):143-169.
    Is there anything peculiarly "photographic" about photography—something which sets it apart from all other ways of making pictures? If there is, how important is it to our understanding of photographs? Are photographs so unlike other sorts of pictures as to require unique methods of interpretation and standards of evaluation? These questions may sound artificial, made up especially for the purpose of theorizing. But they have in fact been asked and answered not only by critics and photographers but by laymen. Furthermore, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  31.  1
    What Would Socrates Do?: Self-Examination, Civic Engagement, and the Politics of Philosophy.Joel Alden Schlosser - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    Socrates continues to be an extremely influential force to this day; his work is featured prominently in the work of contemporary thinkers ranging from Hannah Arendt and Leo Strauss, to Michel Foucault and Jacques Rancière. Intervening in this discussion, What Would Socrates Do? reconstructs Socrates' philosophy in ancient Athens to show its promise of empowering citizens and non-citizens alike. By drawing them into collective practices of dialogue and reflection, philosophy can help people to become thinking, acting beings more capable of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  32. Review of A Priori Justification. [REVIEW]Joel Pust - 2005 - Mind 114 (453):124-128.
    A review of Albert Casullo's "A Priori Justification" (Oxford University Press).
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  33.  65
    Artificial intelligence and the value of transparency.Joel Walmsley - 2021 - AI and Society 36 (2):585-595.
    Some recent developments in Artificial Intelligence—especially the use of machine learning systems, trained on big data sets and deployed in socially significant and ethically weighty contexts—have led to a number of calls for “transparency”. This paper explores the epistemological and ethical dimensions of that concept, as well as surveying and taxonomising the variety of ways in which it has been invoked in recent discussions. Whilst “outward” forms of transparency may be straightforwardly achieved, what I call “functional” transparency about the inner (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  34.  76
    Accounting as a Facilitator of Extreme Narcissism.Joel H. Amernic & Russell J. Craig - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (1):79 - 93.
    We add texture to the conclusion of Duchon and Drake (Journal of Business Ethics, 85, 2009, 301) that extreme narcissism is associated with unethical conduct. We argue that the special features possessed by financial accounting facilitate extreme narcissism in susceptible CEOs. In particular, we propose that extremely narcissistic CEOs are key players in a recurring discourse cycle facilitated by financial accounting language and measures. Such CEOs project themselves as the corporation they lead, construct a narrative about the corporation and themselves (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  35.  88
    Self-Consciousness.Joel Smith - 2017 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    -/- Human beings are conscious not only of the world around them but also of themselves: their activities, their bodies, and their mental lives. They are, that is, self-conscious (or, equivalently, self-aware). Self-consciousness can be understood as an awareness of oneself. But a self-conscious subject is not just aware of something that merely happens to be themselves, as one is if one sees an old photograph without realising that it is of oneself. Rather a self-conscious subject is aware of themselves (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  36.  72
    Species Concepts and Speciation Analysis.Joel Cracraft - 1983 - In R. F. Johnston (ed.), Current Ornithology. Plenum Press. pp. 159-87.
  37.  88
    The Modal Logic of Set-Theoretic Potentialism and the Potentialist Maximality Principles.Joel David Hamkins & Øystein Linnebo - 2022 - Review of Symbolic Logic 15 (1):1-35.
    We analyze the precise modal commitments of several natural varieties of set-theoretic potentialism, using tools we develop for a general model-theoretic account of potentialism, building on those of Hamkins, Leibman and Löwe [14], including the use of buttons, switches, dials and ratchets. Among the potentialist conceptions we consider are: rank potentialism, Grothendieck–Zermelo potentialism, transitive-set potentialism, forcing potentialism, countable-transitive-model potentialism, countable-model potentialism, and others. In each case, we identify lower bounds for the modal validities, which are generally either S4.2 or S4.3, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  38. Against Explanationist Skepticism Regarding Philosophical Intuitions.Joel Pust - 2001 - Philosophical Studies 106 (3):227 - 258.
    Though most of analytic philosophy is based upon intuitions, some philosophers are beginning to question whether intuitions are an appropriate basis for philosophical theory. This paper responds to the arguments of some contemporary philosophers who hold that intuitions should not be treated as evidence for anything other than our contingent psychological constitution. It begins with a demonstration that skeptical arguments by Gilbert Harman and Alvin Goldman are variations on an argument with the potential to undermine the use of intuitions in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  39. Conditionalization and Essentially Indexical Credence.Joel Pust - 2012 - Journal of Philosophy 109 (4):295-315.
    One can have no prior credence whatsoever (not even zero) in a temporally indexical claim. This fact saves the principle of conditionalization from potential counterexample and undermines the Elga and Arntzenius/Dorr arguments for the thirder position and Lewis' argument for the halfer position on the Sleeping Beauty Problem, thereby supporting the double-halfer position. -/- .
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  40.  89
    Those Who Have the Gold Make the Evidence: How the Pharmaceutical Industry Biases the Outcomes of Clinical Trials of Medications. [REVIEW]Joel Lexchin - 2012 - Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):247-261.
    Pharmaceutical companies fund the bulk of clinical research that is carried out on medications. Poor outcomes from these studies can have negative effects on sales of medicines. Previous research has shown that company funded research is much more likely to yield positive outcomes than research with any other sponsorship. The aim of this article is to investigate the possible ways in which bias can be introduced into research outcomes by drawing on concrete examples from the published literature. Poorer methodology in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  41.  48
    Autonomy and Vulnerability Entwined.Joel Anderson - 2013 - In Catriona Mackenzie, Wendy Rogers & Susan Dodds (eds.), Vulnerability: New Essays in Ethics and Feminist Philosophy. Oup Usa. pp. 134.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  42.  10
    The Information-Loss Model: A Mathematical Theory of Age-Related Cognitive Slowing.Joel Myerson, Sandra Hale, David Wagstaff & Leonard W. Poon - 1990 - Psychological Review 97 (4):475-487.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  43.  41
    The Lottery Preparation.Joel David Hamkins - 2000 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 101 (2-3):103-146.
    The lottery preparation, a new general kind of Laver preparation, works uniformly with supercompact cardinals, strongly compact cardinals, strong cardinals, measurable cardinals, or what have you. And like the Laver preparation, the lottery preparation makes these cardinals indestructible by various kinds of further forcing. A supercompact cardinal κ, for example, becomes fully indestructible by <κ-directed closed forcing; a strong cardinal κ becomes indestructible by κ-strategically closed forcing; and a strongly compact cardinal κ becomes indestructible by, among others, the forcing to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   56 citations  
  44.  28
    Phantom Perception: Voluntary and Involuntary Nonretinal Vision.Joel Pearson & Fred Westbrook - 2015 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (5):278-284.
  45. Natural Selection Explanation and Origin Essentialism.Joel Pust - 2001 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 31 (2):201-220.
    Does natural selection explain why individual organisms have the traits that they do? According to "the Negative View," natural selection does not explain why any individual organism has the traits that it does. According to "the Positive View," natural selection at least sometimes does explain why an individual organism has the traits that it does. In this paper, I argue that recent arguments for the Positive View fail in virtue of running afoul of the doctrine of origin essentialism and I (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  46. Gap Forcing: Generalizing the Lévy-Solovay Theorem.Joel David Hamkins - 1999 - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 5 (2):264-272.
    The Lévy-Solovay Theorem [8] limits the kind of large cardinal embeddings that can exist in a small forcing extension. Here I announce a generalization of this theorem to a broad new class of forcing notions. One consequence is that many of the forcing iterations most commonly found in the large cardinal literature create no new weakly compact cardinals, measurable cardinals, strong cardinals, Woodin cardinals, strongly compact cardinals, supercompact cardinals, almost huge cardinals, huge cardinals, and so on.
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  47.  22
    Three Rival Versions of Moral Enquiry: Encyclopaedia, Genealogy, and Tradition.Joel J. Kupperman - 1992 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 52 (3):737-740.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  48. What Makes Any Agent a Moral Agent? Reflections on Machine Consciousness and Moral Agency.Joel Parthemore & Blay Whitby - 2013 - International Journal of Machine Consciousness 5 (2):105-129.
    In this paper, we take moral agency to be that context in which a particular agent can, appropriately, be held responsible for her actions and their consequences. In order to understand moral agency, we will discuss what it would take for an artifact to be a moral agent. For reasons that will become clear over the course of the paper, we take the artifactual question to be a useful way into discussion but ultimately misleading. We set out a number of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  49. Regimes of Autonomy.Joel Anderson - 2014 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (3):355-368.
    Like being able to drive a car, being autonomous is a socially attributed, claimed, and contested status. Normative debates about criteria for autonomy (and what autonomy entitles one to) are best understood, not as debates about what autonomy, at core, really is, but rather as debates about the relative merits of various possible packages of thresholds, entitlements, regulations, values, and institutions. Within different “regimes” of autonomy, different criteria for (degrees of) autonomy become authoritative. Neoliberal, solidaristic, and perfectionist regimes entail conflicting (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  50. On Explaining Knowledge of Necessity.Joel Pust - 2004 - Dialectica 58 (1):71–87.
    Moderate rationalists maintain that our rational intuitions provide us with prima facie justification for believing various necessary propositions. Such a claim is often criticized on the grounds that our having reliable rational intuitions about domains in which the truths are necessary is inexplicable in some epistemically objectionable sense. In this paper, I defend moderate rationalism against such criticism. I argue that if the reliability of our rational intuitions is taken to be contingent, then there is no reason to think that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000