18 found
Order:
  1.  41
    Genethics: Moral Issues in the Creation of People.Joanna Pasek - 1993 - Philosophical Quarterly 43 (172):385.
    Unprecedented advances in medicine, genetic engineering, and demographic forecasting raise new questions that strain the categories and assumptions of traditional ethical theories. Heyd's approach resolves many paradoxes in intergenerational justice, while offering a major test case for the profound problems of the limits of ethics and the nature of value.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   58 citations  
  2.  51
    Justice, Posterity, and the Environment.Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume provides a thought-provoking critique the main, existing school of environmental ethics and seeks to build a more coherent and rigorous philosophical basis for future environmental policy.
  3.  47
    Plural Values and Environmental Valuation.Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek - 1997 - Environmental Values 6 (1):65 - 86.
    The paper discusses some of the criticisms of contingent valuation (CV) and allied techniques for estimating the intensity of peoples' preferences for the environment. The weakness of orthodox utilitarian assumptions in economics concerning the commensurability of all items entering into peoples' choices is discussed. The concept of commensurability is explored as is the problem of rational choice between incommensurate alternatives. While the frequent claim that the environment has some unique moral intrinsic value is unsustainable, its preservation often raises ethical and (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  4.  1
    The Rights of Future Generations.Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek - 2001 - In Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek (eds.), Justice, Posterity, and the Environment. Oxford University Press.
    It is widely believed that environmental conservation has to be guided by respect for the ‘rights’ of future generations. But it is argued in this chapter that it may not be plausible to think in terms of the ‘rights’ of future generations in general or their rights to any specific environmental assets. Future generations may well have rights when they come into existence, but these will only be rights that can be satisfied at the time. But ‘rights’ do not exhaust (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5. Conclusions.Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek - 2001 - In Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek (eds.), Justice, Posterity, and the Environment. Oxford University Press.
    It is recalled that serious doubts can be raised concerning the status of theories such as those pertaining to the rights of future generations, or the constraints imposed on us by theories of intergenerational justice. At the same time, we do have moral obligations to future generations. But these must be based on an appraisal of what are likely to be the main interests that future generations will have and which of these are most likely to be under permanent threat. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. How Much Richer Will Future Generations Be?Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek - 2001 - In Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek (eds.), Justice, Posterity, and the Environment. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter leaves the ‘safe’ world of philosophical speculation and turns to the dangerous world of economic prediction. It outlines the economic reasons for believing that, in the very long term—i.e. abstracting from cyclical or other transitory fluctuations in economic activity—future generations will be incomparably richer than people today. Reasons are also given for believing that there will be no significant obstacles to future growth on account of popularly feared environmental developments, such as running out of ‘finite’ resources, or climate (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Intergenerational Equity.Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek - 2001 - In Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek (eds.), Justice, Posterity, and the Environment. Oxford University Press.
    Discusses one principle that has been suggested as a guide to the way we ought to take account of the interests of future generations, namely the principle of intergenerational ‘equity’ and its related claim of intergenerational equality, particularly in spheres such as the way we should share out ‘finite’ resources among generations. This chapter examines the possible arguments in favour of intergenerational egalitarianism and concludes that they are difficult to defend. It is proposed that egalitarianism should be replaced by the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Introduction: Ethics and Economics in Environmental Policy.Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek - 2001 - In Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek (eds.), Justice, Posterity, and the Environment. Oxford University Press.
    During the last two or three decades, various developments in the environmental sphere have led to increasing concern with our obligations to posterity and to the non‐human part of the natural world. These developments have exposed gaps in both traditional, moral, and political theory and in conventional economics. Environmental issues have exposed these gaps and have brought to the fore questions such as how far the society, with whose welfare we are concerned, includes future generations or is limited to individual (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. International Justice and Sharing the Burden of Environmental Protection.Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek - 2001 - In Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek (eds.), Justice, Posterity, and the Environment. Oxford University Press.
    Some current environmental problems are global and have public good elements that raise, in an acute form, the question of how the costs of a collective effort from which the world as a whole will benefit should be shared out among poor and rich countries. This chapter discusses how far theories of justice provide guidance to this question. It argues that the answer seems to be ‘very little’ and that, in order to arrive at some ground rules for allocating the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. International Justice and the Environment: Global Warming and Biodiversity.Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek - 2001 - In Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek (eds.), Justice, Posterity, and the Environment. Oxford University Press.
    It is argued that although there may be some case, on economic grounds, for international cooperative action to deal with the threat of climate change or an excessive depletion of biodiversity, the advantages of participation in such action are probably not very great for most rich countries. Furthermore, some of the ‘ethical’ arguments advanced in support of the view that the rich countries should shoulder most of the burden of international action are weak. Nevertheless, there is a case for the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Justice Between Generations.Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek - 2001 - In Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek (eds.), Justice, Posterity, and the Environment. Oxford University Press.
    Although there are many theories of justice, one crucial feature of those that are most widely accepted is that they lay down principles that determine the allocation of rights and obligations in society. They do not eliminate conflicts of interest between different groups but, by specifying such principles, they are designed to enable conflicting interests to be resolved in a peaceful and harmonious manner. But insofar as future generations cannot be said to have any rights, their interests cannot be protected (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Our Obligations to Future Generations.Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek - 2001 - In Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek (eds.), Justice, Posterity, and the Environment. Oxford University Press.
    Even if future generations have no rights and intergenerational justice, intergenerational egalitarianism, and sustainable development are all flawed, this does relieve us of a moral obligation to take account of the impact of our policies on the interests of future generations. In this chapter we argue that whereas, in the very long run, it seems that widespread acute poverty will be eliminated and a decent environment will be preserved, there seems to be no prospect of ever eradicating the inherent weaknesses (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Plural Values and Environmental Valuation.Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek - 2001 - In Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek (eds.), Justice, Posterity, and the Environment. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter discusses critically the main criticisms of the use of cost‐benefit analysis in environmental policy, such as the incommensurability of environmental values with the values born by marketable goods, and the related unreliability of estimates of peoples’ willingness to pay for environmental protection. While it is found that there is some strength in these criticisms, it is still necessary to take account of the resource constraint involved in decisions concerning public goods. Furthermore, a democratic society needs some impartial and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Plural Values and Environmental Evaluation.Wilfred Beckerman, Joanna Pasek & Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment - 1996 - Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Sustainable Development.Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek - 2001 - In Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek (eds.), Justice, Posterity, and the Environment. Oxford University Press.
    Another widely suggested principle governing our obligations to future generations is ‘sustainable development’. The first part of this chapter argues that the mainstream interpretations of the concept of sustainable development are open to serious objections on ethical grounds. The chapter also shows that even if intergenerational egalitarianism were a viable objective there is nothing intergenerationally egalitarian about sustainable development.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  2
    The Intrinsic Value of the Environment.Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek - 2001 - In Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek (eds.), Justice, Posterity, and the Environment. Oxford University Press.
    Generations are not homogeneous entities and are composed of individuals and nations that have conflicting interests in the way in which resources are allocated among competing uses. This chapter discusses whether ‘the environment’, or ‘nature’, should enjoy special status in any allocation; whether the economist's approach is too anthropocentric; the concept of ‘intrinsic’ values; and the application of these concepts to environmental valuation. It is argued that while many environmental assets are ‘public goods’, so that the free market is unlikely (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  24
    Informed Consent: Patient Autonomy and Clinician Beneficence within Health Care. [REVIEW]Joanna Pasek - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (2):149-149.
  18.  4
    Review of Counting the Cost of Global Warming. [REVIEW]Wilfred Beckerman & Joanna Pasek - 1992 - Environmental Values 1 (4):363-364.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark