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  1.  5
    The Phylogenetic Roots of Human Kinship Systems.Joan B. Silk - 2021 - Biological Theory 16 (3):127-134.
    Nonhuman primates don’t have formal kinship systems, but genetic relatedness shapes patterns of residence, behavior, mating preferences, and cognition in the primate order. The goal of this article is to provide insight about the ancestral foundations on which the first human kinship systems were built. In order for evolution to favor nepotistic biases in behavior, individuals need to have opportunities to interact with their relatives and to be able to identify them. Both these requirements impose constraints on the evolution of (...)
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  2. Cheap talk when interests conflict.Joan B. Silk & Robert Boyd - unknown
    Most evolutionary analyses of animal communication suggest that low-cost signals can evolve only when both the signaller and the recipient rank outcomes in the same order. When there is a conflict of interest between sender and receiver, honest signals must be costly. However, recent work suggests that low-cost signals can be evolutionarily stable, even when the sender and the receiver rank outcomes in different orders, as long as the interest in achieving coordination is sufficiently great. In this paper, we extend (...)
     
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  3. The adaptive value of soicality in mammalian agroups.Joan B. Silk - 2007 - In Nathan Emery, Nicola Clayton & Chris Frith (eds.), Social Intelligence: From Brain to Culture. Oxford University Press.
     
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  4. Ontogeny of prosocial behavior across diverse societies.Bailey R. House, Joan B. Silk, Joseph Henrich, H. Clark Barrett, Brooke A. Scelza, Adam H. Boyette, Barry S. Hewlett, Richard McElreath & Stephen Laurence - 2013 - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 110 (36):14586-14591.
    Humans are an exceptionally cooperative species, but there is substantial variation in the extent of cooperation across societies. Understanding the sources of this variability may provide insights about the forces that sustain cooperation. We examined the ontogeny of prosocial behavior by studying 326 children 3–14 y of age and 120 adults from six societies (age distributions varied across societies). These six societies span a wide range of extant human variation in culture, geography, and subsistence strategies, including foragers, herders, horticulturalists, and (...)
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  5.  43
    Human adoption in evolutionary perspective.Joan B. Silk - 1990 - Human Nature 1 (1):25-52.
    Exploitation is a fundamental element of the parental strategies of many species of birds. Cuckoos, for example, lay their eggs in the nest of other birds, who often unwittingly rear the alien nestlings as their own. Nest parasitism is an efficient reproductive strategy for cuckoos, who do not have to worry about building a nest, incubating their eggs, or feeding their nestlings. But not all hosts respond passively to such intrusions. In response to parasitic cowbirds, for example, robins have evolved (...)
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  6.  9
    Adoption Among the Inuit.Joan B. Silk - 1987 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 15 (3):320-330.
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  7.  14
    Fosterage as a System of Dispersed Cooperative Breeding.Brooke A. Scelza & Joan B. Silk - 2014 - Human Nature 25 (4):448-464.
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  8. Empathy, sympathy and prosocial preferences in primates.Joan B. Silk - 2009 - In Robin Dunbar & Louise Barrett (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Evolutionary Psychology. Oxford University Press.
     
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  9.  9
    Making amends.Joan B. Silk - 1998 - Human Nature 9 (4):341-368.
    Conflict is an integral, and potentially disruptive, element in the lives of humans and other group-living animals. But conflicts are often settled, sometimes within minutes after the altercation has ended. The goal of this paper is to understand why primates, including humans, make amends. Primatologists have gathered an impressive body of evidence which demonstrates that monkeys and apes use a variety of behavioral mechanisms to resolve conflicts. Peaceful post-conflict interactions in nonhuman primates, sometimes labeled "reconciliation," have clear and immediate effects (...)
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