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  1.  9
    Mencius' refutation of Yang Zhu and mozi and the theoretical implication of confucian benevolence and love.Jinglin Li - 2010 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (2):155-178.
    Confucianism defined benevolence with “feelings” and “ love.” “Feelings” in Confucianism can be mainly divided into three categories: feelings in general, love for one’s relatives, and compassion. The seven kinds of feeling in which people respond to things can be summarized as “likes and dislikes.” The mind responds to things through feelings; based on the mind of benevolence and righteousness or feelings of compassion, the expression of feelings can conform to the principle of the mean and reach the integration of (...)
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  2. Zhongguo zhe xue shi tong.Qingkun Chen & Jinglin Li (eds.) - 1995 - Changchun Shi: Jilin da xue chu ban zhe.
     
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  3.  4
    Jiao hua de zhe xue.Jinglin Li - 2006 - Haerbin Shi: Heilongjiang ren min chu ban she.
    主要内容包括:中国财政管理、水利经济、水利部门预算编制、水利财政控制管理工作、水利投融资及筹资、水利资本运营等。.
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  4. Jiao yang di ben yuan: zhe xue tu po qi di ru jia xin xing lun.Jinglin Li - 1998 - Shenyang Shi: Liaoning sheng xin hua shu dian fa xing.
     
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  5.  6
    On the creativity and innateness of the “strong, moving vital force”: A discussion of Feng Youlan’s “explanation of Mencius’ chapter on the ‘strong, moving vital force’”.Jinglin Li - 2009 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (2):198-210.
    Feng Youlan emphasizes the concept of “creativity” in his article “Explanation of Mencius’ Chapter on Strong, Moving Vital Force”, in particular highlighting the problem whether the “ strong, moving vital force” is “innate” or “acquired”. Cheng Hao and Zhu Xi believed the “ strong, moving vital force” was endowed by Heaven, so was therefore innate; “nourishment” cleared fog and allowed one to “recover one’s original nature”. Mencius’ theory on “the good of human nature” is illustrated in the concept of integrated (...)
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  6.  11
    Philosophical edification and edificatory philosophy: On the basic features of the confucian spirit. [REVIEW]Jinglin Li - 2007 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (2):151-171.
    Edification 教化 is one of the central concepts of Confucianism. The metaphysical basis of the Confucian edification is the “philosophical theory” in the sense of rational humanism rather than the “religious doctrine” in the sense of pure faith. Confucianism did not create a system of ceremony and propriety owned by Confucians only. The system of ceremony and propriety on which Confucians depend to carry out their social edification is that of “rites and music,” the common life style of ancient China. (...)
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  7.  8
    The ontologicalization of the Confucian concept of Xin Xing: Zhou Lianxi’s founding contribution to the Song-Ming Neo-Confucianism. [REVIEW]Jinglin Li - 2006 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (2):204-221.
    The Confucian concept of "cheng" (integrity) emphasizes logical priority of value realization over "zhen shi' (reality or truth). Through value realization and the completion of being, zhenshi can be achieved. Cheng demonstrates the original unity of value and reality. Taking the concept of cheng as the core, Zhou Lianxi's philosophy interpreted yi Dao (the Dao of change), and integrated Yi Jing (The Book of Changes) and Zhong Yong (The Doctrine of the Mean). On the one hand, it ontologicalized the Confucian (...)
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