12 found
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  1. Thinking and feeling: Moral deliberation in a dual-process framework.Jillian Craigie - 2011 - Philosophical Psychology 24 (1):53-71.
    Empirical research in the field of moral cognition is increasingly being used to draw conclusions in philosophical moral psychology, in particular regarding sentimentalist and rationalist accounts of moral judgment. This paper calls for a reassessment of both the empirical and philosophical conclusions being drawn from the moral cognition research. It is proposed that moral decision making is best understood as a species of Kahneman and Frederick's dual-process model of decision making. According to this model, emotional intuition-generating processes and reflective processes (...)
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  2. Competence, practical rationality and what a patient values.Jillian Craigie - 2009 - Bioethics 25 (6):326-333.
    According to the principle of patient autonomy, patients have the right to be self-determining in decisions about their own medical care, which includes the right to refuse treatment. However, a treatment refusal may legitimately be overridden in cases where the decision is judged to be incompetent. It has recently been proposed that in assessments of competence, attention should be paid to the evaluative judgments that guide patients' treatment decisions.In this paper I examine this claim in light of theories of practical (...)
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  3.  29
    Hopping, skipping or jumping to conclusions? Clarifying the role of the JTC bias in delusions.Cordelia Fine, Mark Gardner, Jillian Craigie & Ian Gold - 2007 - Cogn Neuropsychiatry 12 (1):46-77.
    Introduction. There is substantial evidence that patients with delusions exhibit a reasoning bias—known as the “jumping to conclusions” bias—which leads them to accept hypotheses as correct on the basis of less evidence than controls. We address three questions concerning the JTC bias that require clarification. Firstly, what is the best measure of the JTC bias? Second, is the JTC bias correlated specifically with delusions, or only with the symptomatology of schizophrenia? And third, is the bias enhanced by emotionally salient material? (...)
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  4.  38
    A Fine Balance: Reconsidering Patient Autonomy in Light of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.Jillian Craigie - 2014 - Bioethics 29 (6):398-405.
    The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities is increasingly seen as driving a paradigm shift in mental health law, particularly in relation to the understanding that it requires a shift from substituted to supported decisions. This article identifies two competing moral commitments implied by this shift, both of which appeal to the notion of autonomy. It is argued that because of these commitments the Convention is in tension with more general calls in the medical ethics literature for preserving (...)
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  5. Damned if you do; damned if you don’t: The impasse in cognitive accounts of the Capgras Delusion.Cordelia Fine, Jillian Craigie & Ian Gold - 2005 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (2):143-151.
  6.  34
    Propranolol, cognitive biases, and practical decision-making.Jillian Craigie - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (9):31 – 32.
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  7. The explanation approach to delusion.Cordelia Fine, Jillian Craigie & Ian Gold - 2005 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (2):159-163.
  8.  67
    Against a singular understanding of legal capacity: Criminal responsibility and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.Jillian Craigie - 2015 - International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 40:6-14.
    The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) is being used to argue for wider recognition of the legal capacity of people with mental disabilities. This raises a question about the implications of the Convention for attributions of criminal responsibility. The present paper works towards an answer by analysing the relationship between legal capacity in relation to personal decisions and criminal acts. Its central argument is that because moral and political considerations play an essential role in (...)
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  9.  26
    The ethics of pharmacogenomics.David Neil & Jillian Craigie - 2004 - Monash Bioethics Review 23 (2):9-20.
    Of the future technologies arising from the Human Genome Project, pharmacogenomics will probably be the first to have a widespread impact on the everyday practice of medicine. This technology offers great benefits but also presents some difficult ethical challenges. This paper explains what pharmacogenomics is and examines three of the issues that it raises: orphan populations, the use of ethnicity in drug trials, and potential obstacles to informed consent for genetic testing.
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  10.  90
    Problems of Control: Alcohol Dependence, Anorexia Nervosa, and the Flexible Interpretation of Mental Incapacity Tests.Jillian Craigie & Ailsa Davies - 2018 - Medical Law Review 27 (2):215-241.
    This article investigates the ability of mental incapacity tests to account for problems of control, through a study of the approach to alcohol dependence and a comparison with the approach to anorexia nervosa, in England and Wales. The focus is on two areas of law where questions of legal and mental capacity arise for people who are alcohol dependent: decisions about treatment for alcohol dependence and diminished responsibility for a killing. The mental incapacity tests used in these legal contexts are (...)
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  11. Rationality, diagnosis and patient autonomy.Jillian Craigie & Lisa Bortolotti - 2014 - Oxford Handbook Psychiatric Ethics.
    In this chapter, our focus is the role played by notions of rationality in the diagnosis of mental disorders, and in the practice of overriding patient autonomy in psychiatry. We describe and evaluate different hypotheses concerning the relationship between rationality and diagnosis, raising questions about what features underpin psychiatric categories. These questions reinforce widely held concerns about the use of diagnosis as a justification for overriding autonomy, which have motivated a shift to mental incapacity as an alternative justification. However, this (...)
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  12.  32
    Moral Modification and the Social Environment.Jillian Craigie - 2014 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 21 (2):127-129.
    In light of the recent focus in bioethics on questions of deliberate moral enhancement through the use of psychoactive drugs, Levy et al. (2014) argue that the more pressing issue may be the incidental effect that prescription drugs could already be having on moral agency. Although concerns have focused on the possibility of altering moral psychology through direct effects on brain function, the authors point out that this may already be a reality, albeit an unintentional one. They conclude from their (...)
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