Results for 'Jill A. Rosenfeld'

998 found
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  1.  7
    A recurrent 16p12.1 microdeletion supports a two-hit model for severe developmental delay.Santhosh Girirajan, Jill A. Rosenfeld, Gregory M. Cooper, Francesca Antonacci, Priscillia Siswara, Andy Itsara, Laura Vives, Tom Walsh, Shane E. McCarthy, Carl Baker, Heather C. Mefford, Jeffrey M. Kidd, Sharon R. Browning, Brian L. Browning, Diane E. Dickel, Deborah L. Levy, Blake C. Ballif, Kathryn Platky, Darren M. Farber, Gordon C. Gowans, Jessica J. Wetherbee, Alexander Asamoah, David D. Weaver, Paul R. Mark, Jennifer Dickerson, Bhuwan P. Garg, Sara A. Ellingwood, Rosemarie Smith, Valerie C. Banks, Wendy Smith, Marie T. McDonald, Joe J. Hoo, Beatrice N. French, Cindy Hudson, John P. Johnson, Jillian R. Ozmore, John B. Moeschler, Urvashi Surti, Luis F. Escobar, Dima El-Khechen, Jerome L. Gorski, Jennifer Kussmann, Bonnie Salbert, Yves Lacassie, Alisha Biser, Donna M. McDonald-McGinn, Elaine H. Zackai, Matthew A. Deardorff, Tamim H. Shaikh, Eric Haan, Kathryn L. Friend, Marco Fichera, Corrado Romano, Jozef Gécz, Lynn E. DeLisi, Jonathan Sebat, Mary-Claire King, Lisa G. Shaffer & Eic - unknown
    We report the identification of a recurrent, 520-kb 16p12.1 microdeletion associated with childhood developmental delay. The microdeletion was detected in 20 of 11,873 cases compared with 2 of 8,540 controls and replicated in a second series of 22 of 9,254 cases compared with 6 of 6,299 controls. Most deletions were inherited, with carrier parents likely to manifest neuropsychiatric phenotypes compared to non-carrier parents. Probands were more likely to carry an additional large copy-number variant when compared to matched controls. The clinical (...)
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  2. Expanding the Frame of "Voluntariness" in Informed Consent: Structural Coercion and the Power of Social and Economic Context.Jill A. Fisher - 2013 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 23 (4):355-379.
    Whether intended or not, conceptions of informed consent are often rooted in archetypal notions of the researcher and prospective study participant. The former is assumed problematically to be a disinterested yet humanitarian individual who is well trained to conduct robust science. The latter is often characterized as being motivated by some altruistic notions about the contribution to science and society they are making even as they seek some personal benefit from the research. Cast in a dyad, the researcher has the (...)
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  3.  5
    I spy without my eye: Covert attention in human social interactions.Jill A. Dosso, Michelle Huynh & Alan Kingstone - 2020 - Cognition 202 (C):104388.
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  4.  9
    Feeding and Bleeding: The Institutional Banalization of Risk to Healthy Volunteers in Phase I Pharmaceutical Clinical Trials.Jill A. Fisher - 2015 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 40 (2):199-226.
    Phase I clinical trials are the first stage of testing new pharmaceuticals in humans. The majority of these studies are conducted under controlled, inpatient conditions using healthy volunteers who are paid for their participation. This article draws on an ethnographic study of six phase I clinics in the United States, including 268 semistructured interviews with research staff and healthy volunteers. In it, I argue that an institutional banalization of risk structures the perceptions of research staff and healthy volunteers participating in (...)
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  5.  7
    Picking and Choosing Among Phase I Trials: A Qualitative Examination of How Healthy Volunteers Understand Study Risks.Jill A. Fisher, Torin Monahan & Rebecca L. Walker - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (4):535-549.
    This article empirically examines how healthy volunteers evaluate and make sense of the risks of phase I clinical drug trials. This is an ethically important topic because healthy volunteers are exposed to risk but can gain no medical benefit from their trial participation. Based on in-depth qualitative interviews with 178 healthy volunteers enrolled in various clinical trials, we found that participants focus on myriad characteristics of clinical trials when assessing risk and making enrolment decisions. These factors include the short-term and (...)
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  6.  7
    Picking and Choosing Among Phase I Trials: A Qualitative Examination of How Healthy Volunteers Understand Study Risks.Jill A. Fisher, Torin Monahan & Rebecca L. Walker - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (4):535-549.
    This article empirically examines how healthy volunteers evaluate and make sense of the risks of phase I clinical drug trials. This is an ethically important topic because healthy volunteers are exposed to risk but can gain no medical benefit from their trial participation. Based on in-depth qualitative interviews with 178 healthy volunteers enrolled in various clinical trials, we found that participants focus on myriad characteristics of clinical trials when assessing risk and making enrolment decisions. These factors include the short-term and (...)
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  7.  5
    Picking and Choosing Among Phase I Trials: A Qualitative Examination of How Healthy Volunteers Understand Study Risks.Jill A. Fisher, Torin Monahan & Rebecca L. Walker - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (4):535-549.
    This article empirically examines how healthy volunteers evaluate and make sense of the risks of phase I clinical drug trials. This is an ethically important topic because healthy volunteers are exposed to risk but can gain no medical benefit from their trial participation. Based on in-depth qualitative interviews with 178 healthy volunteers enrolled in various clinical trials, we found that participants focus on myriad characteristics of clinical trials when assessing risk and making enrolment decisions. These factors include the short-term and (...)
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  8.  7
    Picking and Choosing Among Phase I Trials: A Qualitative Examination of How Healthy Volunteers Understand Study Risks.Jill A. Fisher, Torin Monahan & Rebecca L. Walker - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (4):535-549.
    This article empirically examines how healthy volunteers evaluate and make sense of the risks of phase I clinical drug trials. This is an ethically important topic because healthy volunteers are exposed to risk but can gain no medical benefit from their trial participation. Based on in-depth qualitative interviews with 178 healthy volunteers enrolled in various clinical trials, we found that participants focus on myriad characteristics of clinical trials when assessing risk and making enrolment decisions. These factors include the short-term and (...)
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  9.  46
    Procedural misconceptions and informed consent: Insights from empirical research on the clinical trials industry.Jill A. Fisher - 2006 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 16 (3):251-268.
    : This paper provides a simultaneously reflexive and analytical framework to think about obstacles to truly informed consent in social science and biomedical research. To do so, it argues that informed consent often goes awry due to procedural misconceptions built into the research context. The concept of procedural misconception is introduced to describe how individuals respond to what is familiar in research settings and overlook what is different. In the context of biomedical research, procedural misconceptions can be seen to function (...)
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  10.  19
    Research Payment and Its Social Justice Concerns.Jill A. Fisher - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (9):35-36.
    Volume 19, Issue 9, September 2019, Page 35-36.
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  11.  17
    Institutional mistrust in the organization of pharmaceutical clinical trials.Jill A. Fisher - 2008 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (4):403-413.
    In this paper I explore the politics of trust in the clinical testing of pharmaceuticals in the US. Specifically, I analyze trust in terms of its institutional manifestations in the pharmaceutical clinical trials industry. In the process of testing new drugs, pharmaceutical companies must (1) protect their proprietary information from the clinicians who conduct their studies, and (2) find a way to ensure human subjects’ compliance to study protocols. Concern with these two critical issues leads drug companies to approach clinicians (...)
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  12.  21
    The Influence of Co-action on a Simple Attention Task: A Shift Back to the Status Quo.Jill A. Dosso, Kevin H. Roberts, Alessandra DiGiacomo & Alan Kingstone - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  13.  29
    Moral Salience and the Role of Goodwill in Firm-Stakeholder Trust Repair.Jill A. Brown, Ann K. Buchholtz & Paul Dunn - 2016 - Business Ethics Quarterly 26 (2):181-199.
    ABSTRACT:Re-establishing trust presents a complex challenge for a firm after it commits corporate misconduct. We introduce a new construct, moral salience, which we define as the extent to which the firm’s behavior is morally noticeable to the stakeholder. Moral salience is a function of both the moral intensity of the firm’s behavior and the relational intensity of the firm-stakeholder psychological contract. We apply this moral salience construct to firm misconduct to develop a model of trust repair that is based on (...)
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  14.  12
    Speech errors reflect the phonotactic constraints in recently spoken syllables, but not in recently heard syllables.Jill A. Warker, Ye Xu, Gary S. Dell & Cynthia Fisher - 2009 - Cognition 112 (1):81-96.
  15.  10
    Causal uncertainty and metacognitive inferences about goal attainment.Jill A. Jacobson, Gifford Weary & Y. Sharon Lin - 2008 - Cognition and Emotion 22 (7):1276-1305.
  16.  12
    Correction to: Picking and Choosing Among Phase I Trials.Jill A. Fisher, Torin Monahan & Rebecca L. Walker - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):193-193.
    The article "Picking and Choosing Among Phase I Trials", written by Jill A. Fisher, Torin Monahan and Rebecca L. Walker, was originally published Online First without Open Access. After publication in volume 16, issue 4, page 535-549 the author decided to opt for Open Choice and to make the article an Open Access publication.
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  17.  7
    Global Efforts to Protect Healthy Volunteers.Jill A. Fisher - 2023 - Hastings Center Report 53 (4):2-2.
    Clinical trials on healthy volunteers generate unique ethical challenges both because participants accept potential physical risks without the possibility of direct medical benefit and because participants’ financial motivations to enroll in trials could lead to their exploitation. Despite the large volume of published empirical studies and ethical analyses of healthy volunteer research, there has been little concerted effort to change how healthy‐volunteer research is overseen or regulated. A new collaborative effort to do so is the VolREthics (Volunteers in Research and (...)
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  18.  65
    Tattooing the Body, Marking Culture.Jill A. Fisher - 2002 - Body and Society 8 (4):91-107.
    This article examines the complex relationship between power and the physical and social practices of tattooing in contemporary United States. Briefly tracing the history of tattooing from ancient Greece to contemporary America, I highlight the temporal and geographical changes in the practices and perceptions of tattooing. In addition to creating a historical narrative, I situate the sociocultural practice of tattooing the body for the tattooist and the `tattooee'. This investigation into body inscription serves as a means to elucidate the contemporary (...)
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  19.  21
    Can Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives Improve Global Supply Chains? Improving Deliberative Capacity with a Stakeholder Orientation.Vivek Soundararajan, Jill A. Brown & Andrew C. Wicks - 2019 - Business Ethics Quarterly 29 (3):385-412.
    ABSTRACT:Global multi-stakeholder initiatives are important instruments that have the potential to improve the social and environmental sustainability of global supply chains. However, they often fail to comprehensively address the needs and interests of various supply-chain participants. While voluntary in nature, MSIs have most often been implemented through coercive approaches, resulting in friction among their participants and in systemic problems with decoupling. Additionally, in those cases in which deliberation was constrained between and amongst participants, collaborative approaches have often failed to materialize. (...)
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  20. CSR and Stakeholder Theory: A Tale of Adam Smith. [REVIEW]Jill A. Brown & William R. Forster - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (2):301-312.
    This article leverages insights from the body of Adam Smith’s work, including two lesser-known manuscripts—the Theory of Moral Sentiments and Lectures in Jurisprudence —to help answer the question as to how companies should morally prioritize corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives and stakeholder claims. Smith makes philosophical distinctions between justice and beneficence and perfect and imperfect rights, and we leverage those distinctions to speak to contemporary CSR and stakeholder management theories. We address the often-neglected question as to how far a company (...)
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  21.  23
    Voluntary Governance Mechanisms in Global Supply Chains: Beyond CSR to a Stakeholder Utility Perspective.Vivek Soundararajan & Jill A. Brown - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (1):83-102.
    Poor working conditions remain a serious problem in supplier facilities in developing countries. While previous research has explored this from the developed buyers’ side, we examine this phenomenon from the perspective of developing countries’ suppliers and subcontractors. Utilizing qualitative data from a major knitwear exporting cluster in India and a stakeholder management lens, we develop a framework that shows how the assumptions of conventional, buyer-driven voluntary governance break down in the dilution of buyer power and in the web of factors (...)
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  22.  15
    The Chlorine Spill of 2005 Case Study.Jill A. Brown & Ann K. Buchholtz - 2007 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:495-496.
    This case study reviews a train crash that occurred in January 2005 when a Norfolk Southern freight train struck a parked train on the tracks near Graniteville, South Carolina. At issue is the safe transportation of hazardous materials, the assignment of responsibility, the stakeholder management of participants and the outcome to Avondale Mills, a local textile company that ended up closing its doors after the spill.
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  23.  21
    Scapegoating Under Scrutiny.Jill A. Brown, Ann C. Buchholtz & Andrew Ward - 2008 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 19:383-394.
    This paper develops and tests a model of fingerpointing behaviors that board members experience because of regulatory reforms. We present the partial results of a large study of 138 board members on 54 publicly traded boards in the United States. We found that recent governance reforms that mandate increased accountability of board members are associated with less board cohesion and thatlower board cohesion is associated with fingerpointing behaviors. These findings suggest that the stages of institutionalization following regulatory shock falter when (...)
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  24.  25
    Multinational Corporations and Governance Effectiveness: Toward a More Integrative Board.Cynthia Clark & Jill A. Brown - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (3):565-577.
    Multinational corporations dominate the global business arena, but new expectations for MNC boards call to question how they might effectively manage global stakeholder relationships in this new era of accountability. Uniting political behavior theory, which describes a board’s international political orientation, and global operating governance systems outlining a set of board behaviors, we develop a typology of four types of boards. We then provide recommendations for the development of an integrative governance structure, taking into account the mechanisms, structure, endorsements, and (...)
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  25.  17
    Paths of Corporate Irresponsibility: A Dynamic Process.Jill A. Küberling-Jost - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (3):579-601.
    In this qualitative meta-analysis, I analyze corporate irresponsibility as an emergent organizational process. Organizations enacting irresponsible practices rely not only on a particular form of a process path, but on how this process path evolves within the organization. To achieve a better understanding of this process path, I conducted a qualitative meta-analysis drawn from 20 published cases of irresponsible organizations. I explore how and under which conditions irresponsible behavior of organizations arises, develops, and changes over time. The process path of (...)
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  26.  31
    Justifications and procedures for implementing institutional review boards in business organizations.Robert A. Giacalone & Paul Rosenfeld - 1987 - Journal of Business Ethics 6 (5):399 - 411.
    The present paper describes a number of ethical quandaries facing the implementors of motivational interventions in organizational settings. A critical analysis of the traditional solutions to these issues within the organizational literature finds them lacking for want of considering unwitting cognitive biases and self presentational doublespeak, both of which may result in the rights of research participants being underprotected. The establishment of an Institutional Review process, loosely analogized from the biomedical and behavioral science research traditions, is suggested as a means (...)
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  27.  21
    To report or not to report: Exploring healthy volunteers' rationales for disclosing adverse events in Phase I drug trials.Lisa McManus & Jill A. Fisher - 2018 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 9 (2):82-90.
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  28.  6
    Mission Creep or Mission Lapse? Scientific Review in Research Oversight.Margaret Waltz, Jill A. Fisher & Rebecca L. Walker - 2023 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 14 (1):38-49.
    Background The ethical use both of human and non-human animals in research is predicated on the assumption that it is of a high quality and its projected benefits are more significant than the risks and harms imposed on subjects. Yet questions remain about whether and how IRBs and IACUCs should consider the scientific value of proposed research studies.Methods We draw upon 45 interviews with IRB and IACUC members and researchers with oversight experience about their perceptions of their own roles in (...)
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  29.  20
    Introduction.Raymond de Vries & Jill A. Fisher - 2013 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (4):389-390.
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  30.  27
    Mental state decoding in past major depression: Effect of sad versus happy mood induction.Kate L. Harkness, Jill A. Jacobson, David Duong & Mark A. Sabbagh - 2010 - Cognition and Emotion 24 (3):497-513.
  31.  13
    "My Body is One of the Best Commodities": Exploring the Ethics of Commodification in Phase I Healthy Volunteer Clinical Trials.Rebecca L. Walker & Jill A. Fisher - 2019 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 29 (4):305-331.
    In phase I clinical trials, healthy volunteers are dosed with investigational drugs and subjected to blood draws and other bodily monitoring procedures. In exchange, they are paid. Healthy volunteers are, in a very direct sense, selling access to their bodies for pharmaceutical companies and their associates to run drugs through. In his ethnographic study of socalled professional guinea pigs, Roberto Abadie writes, "Paid volunteers are well aware of the demand for an idealized, perfectly healthy volunteer. They also realize that their (...)
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  32.  30
    Companion Animal Studies: Slipping Through a Research Oversight Gap.Rebecca L. Walker & Jill A. Fisher - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (10):62-63.
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  33.  32
    Playing Patient, Playing Doctor: Munchausen Syndrome, Clinical S/M, and Ruptures of Medical Power. [REVIEW]Jill A. Fisher - 2006 - Journal of Medical Humanities 27 (3):135-149.
    This article deploys sadomasochism as a framework for understanding medical practice on an institutional level. By examining the case of the factitious illness Munchausen syndrome, this article analyzes the operations of power in the doctor-patient relationship through the trope of role-playing. Because Munchausen syndrome causes a disruption to the dyadic relationship between physicians and patients, a lens of sadomasochism highlights dynamics of power in medical practice that are often obscured in everyday practice. Specifically, this article illustrates how classification and diagnosis (...)
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  34.  6
    Review of Donald W. Light and Antonio F. Maturo, Good Pharma: The Public-Health Model of the Mario Negri Institute1. [REVIEW]Jill A. Fisher - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (2):W9 - W10.
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  35. Speech errors and the implicit learning of phonological sequences.S. Dell Gary, A. Warker Jill & Christine Whalen - 2009 - In Ezequiel Morsella, John A. Bargh & Peter M. Gollwitzer (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Human Action. Oxford University Press.
     
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  36.  29
    Death by transposition – the enemy within?John M. Sedivy, Jill A. Kreiling, Nicola Neretti, Marco De Cecco, Steven W. Criscione, Jeffrey W. Hofmann, Xiaoai Zhao, Takahiro Ito & Abigail L. Peterson - 2013 - Bioessays 35 (12):1035-1043.
    Here we present and develop the hypothesis that the derepression of endogenous retrotransposable elements (RTEs) – “genomic parasites” – is an important and hitherto under‐unexplored molecular aging process that can potentially occur in most tissues. We further envision that the activation and continued presence of retrotransposition contribute to age‐associated tissue degeneration and pathology. Chromatin is a complex and dynamic structure that needs to be maintained in a functional state throughout our lifetime. Studies of diverse species have revealed that chromatin undergoes (...)
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  37.  18
    Presentation duration and false recall for semantic and phonological associates.Nicole Ballardini, Jill A. Yamashita & William P. Wallace - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):64-71.
    Two experiments examined false recall for lists of semantically and phonologically associated words as a function of presentation duration. Veridical recall increased with long exposure durations for all lists. For semantically associated lists, false recall increased from 20–250 ms, then decreased. There was a high level of false recall with 20 ms durations for phonologically associated lists , which declined as duration increased. In Experiment 2, for lists presented at 20 and 50 ms rates, false recall given zero correct recall (...)
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  38.  29
    Employees as Conduits for Effective Stakeholder Engagement: An Example from B Corporations.Anne-Laure P. Winkler, Jill A. Brown & David L. Finegold - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (4):913-936.
    Is there a link between how a firm manages its internal and external stakeholders? More specifically, are firms that give employees stock ownership and more say in running the enterprise more likely to engage with external stakeholders? This study seeks to answer these questions by elaborating on mechanisms that link employees to external stakeholders, such as the community, suppliers, and the environment. It tests these relationships using a sample of 347 private, mostly small-to-medium size firms, which completed a stakeholder impact (...)
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  39.  13
    For love or money? What motivates people to know the minds of others?Kate L. Harkness, Jill A. Jacobson, Brooke Sinclair, Emilie Chan & Mark A. Sabbagh - 2012 - Cognition and Emotion 26 (3):541-549.
    Mood affects social cognition and “theory of mind”, such that people in a persistent negative mood (i.e., dysphoria) have enhanced abilities at making subtle judgements about others’ mental states. Theorists have argued that this hypersensitivity to subtle social cues may have adaptive significance in terms of solving interpersonal problems and/or minimising social risk. We tested whether increasing the social salience of a theory of mind task would preferentially increase dyspshoric individuals’ performance on the task. Forty-four dysphoric and 51 non-dysphoric undergraduate (...)
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  40.  20
    Corporate Philanthropy Research.Ann K. Buchholtz & Jill A. Brown - 2006 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:70-71.
    Individual studies have contributed to our knowledge of corporate philanthropy, but to date they remain fragmented. We proposed to extricate the conceptual and empirical work in corporate social responsibility from the conceptual and empirical work on corporate philanthropy, limiting our review to works that specifically refer to corporate philanthropy, as well as works that are labeled as corporate social responsibility but actually operationalize it as philanthropy. We will present an integrative model of corporate philanthropy research that draws on research from (...)
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  41.  29
    The professional ethics course.Darrell Reeck & Jill A. Sharrard - 1980 - Journal of Medical Humanities 2 (2):112-117.
    A professional ethics program was recently developed and implemented as a comparative values course at the University of Puget Sound. This article is a report ontheprogram, “Professional Ethics fora Technological Era.”The program consists of two courses: “Ethics for a Technological Era,” and “Values: Conflict and Compromise.” The first course emphasizes skills necessary for ethical decision making. The second course follows through with an opportunity to apply these skills to a major social policy program. This article discusses the approach to ethics, (...)
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  42.  7
    More Than an Umbrella Construct: We Can (and Should) Do Better With CSR by Theorizing Through Context.Hari Bapuji, Frank G. A. de Bakker, Colin Higgins, Kathleen Rehbein, Andrew Spicer & Jill A. Brown - 2022 - Business and Society 61 (8):1965-1976.
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  43.  34
    Serial Participation and the Ethics of Phase 1 Healthy Volunteer Research.Rebecca L. Walker, Marci D. Cottingham & Jill A. Fisher - 2018 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 43 (1):83-114.
    Phase 1 healthy volunteer clinical trials—which financially compensate subjects in tests of drug toxicity levels and side effects—appear to place pressure on each joint of the moral framework justifying research. In this article, we review concerns about phase 1 trials as they have been framed in the bioethics literature, including undue inducement and coercion, unjust exploitation, and worries about compromised data validity. We then revisit these concerns in light of the lived experiences of serial participants who are income-dependent on phase (...)
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  44.  14
    Appraising Harm in Phase I Trials: Healthy Volunteers' Accounts of Adverse Events.Lisa McManus, Arlene Davis, Rebecca L. Forcier & Jill A. Fisher - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (2):323-333.
    While risk of harm is an important focus for whether clinical research on humans can and should proceed, there is uncertainty about what constitutes harm to a trial participant. In Phase I trials on healthy volunteers, the purpose of the research is to document and measure safety concerns associated with investigational drugs, and participants are financially compensated for their enrollment in these studies. In this article, we investigate how characterizations of harm are narrated by healthy volunteers in the context of (...)
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  45.  7
    Business and Society Research in Times of the Corona Crisis.Andrew Spicer, Kathleen Rehbein, Colin Higgins, Jill A. Brown, Frank G. A. de Bakker & Hari Bapuji - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (6):1067-1078.
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  46.  15
    Building on Its Past: The Future of Business and Society Scholarship.Andrew Spicer, Kathleen Rehbein, Colin Higgins, Hari Bapuji, Frank G. A. de Bakker & Jill A. Brown - 2022 - Business and Society 61 (5):967-979.
    This Special Issue commemorates the 60th anniversary of Business & Society with nine rigorous literature reviews that address important societal problems and provide opportunities for theory development in the business and society field; in this introduction we present an overview of the Special Issue. With the theme “Building on Its Past,” the nine articles address a host of contemporary issues, including climate change, wicked problems, business and human rights, human health, certifications standards, the governance of artificial intelligence, stakeholder engagement, stakeholder (...)
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  47.  5
    Principal Components Analysis Using Data Collected From Healthy Individuals on Two Robotic Assessment Platforms Yields Similar Behavioral Patterns.Michael D. Wood, Leif E. R. Simmatis, Jill A. Jacobson, Sean P. Dukelow, J. Gordon Boyd & Stephen H. Scott - 2021 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 15.
    BackgroundKinarm Standard Tests is a suite of upper limb tasks to assess sensory, motor, and cognitive functions, which produces granular performance data that reflect spatial and temporal aspects of behavior. We have previously used principal component analysis to reduce the dimensionality of multivariate data using the Kinarm End-Point Lab. Here, we performed PCA using data from the Kinarm Exoskeleton Lab, and determined agreement of PCA results across EP and EXO platforms in healthy participants. We additionally examined whether further dimensionality reduction (...)
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  48.  19
    Board Socio-Cognitive Decision-Making and Task Performance Under Heightened Expectations of Accountability.Andrew J. Ward, Marcus M. Butts, Ann Buchholtz & Jill A. Brown - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (3):574-611.
    This study examines how heightened expectations of board responsibility and accountability affect the socio-cognitive decision-making of boards and their collective task performance. Using data from the directors of 60 boards who served before and after the enactment of Sarbanes–Oxley, this study provides insight into the potential negative impact that this tightened accountability environment can have on a board’s task performance. Examining several socio-cognitive elements of board decision-making, board authority is found to have a positive main effect on board task performance, (...)
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  49.  5
    Something Old, Something New: Continuity and Change at Business & Society.Andrew Spicer, Kathleen Rehbein, Colin Higgins, Frank G. A. de Bakker, Jill A. Brown & Hari Bapuji - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (5):791-798.
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  50.  2
    Naïve beliefs shape emotional reactions to evaluative feedback.Thomas I. Vaughan-Johnston & Jill A. Jacobson - 2021 - Cognition and Emotion 35 (2):375-384.
    People are motivated to acquire self-evaluative information that favours themselves or information that confirms their present self-views. We proposed that par...
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