8 found
Order:
  1.  2
    Preprints in Times of COVID19: The Time is Ripe for Agreeing on Terminology and Good Practices.Paul N. Newton, Tammy Hoffmann, E. Bottieau, Peter W. Horby, Laura Merson, Ana Palmero, Amar Jesani, Carlos E. Durán, Aasim Ahmad, Philippe J. Guerin, Jerome Amir Singh, Muhammad H. Zaman, Céline Caillet & Raffaella Ravinetto - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-5.
    Over recent years, the research community has been increasingly using preprint servers to share manuscripts that are not yet peer-reviewed. Even if it enables quick dissemination of research findings, this practice raises several challenges in publication ethics and integrity. In particular, preprints have become an important source of information for stakeholders interested in COVID19 research developments, including traditional media, social media, and policy makers. Despite caveats about their nature, many users can still confuse pre-prints with peer-reviewed manuscripts. If unconfirmed but (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  37
    American Physicians and Dual Loyalty Obligations in the "War on Terror".Jerome Amir Singh - 2003 - BMC Medical Ethics 4 (1):1-10.
    Background Post-September 11, 2001, the U.S. government has labeled thousands of Afghan war detainees "unlawful combatants". This label effectively deprives these detainees of the protection they would receive as "prisoners of war" under international humanitarian law. Reports have emerged that indicate that thousands of detainees being held in secret military facilities outside the United States are being subjected to questionable "stress and duress" interrogation tactics by U.S. authorities. If true, American military physicians could be inadvertently becoming complicit in detainee abuse. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  3.  12
    Informed Consent and Community Engagement in Open Field Research: Lessons for Gene Drive Science.Jerome Amir Singh - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):1-12.
    The development of the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing system has generated new possibilities for the use of gene drive constructs to reduce or suppress mosquito populations to levels that do not support disease transmission. Despite this prospect, social resistance to genetically modified organisms remains high. Gene drive open field research thus raises important questions regarding what is owed to those who may not consent to such research, or those could be affected by the proposed research, but whose consent is not solicited. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  28
    Organ Donation, Discrimination After Death, Anti-Vaccination Sentiments, and Tuberculosis Management.John Coggon, Bill Madden, Tina Cockburn, Cameron Stewart, Jerome Amir Singh, Anant Bhan, Ross E. Upshur & Bernadette Richards - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (2):125-133.
  5. Physician Participation in Torture.Jerome Amir Singh - 2008 - In Peter A. Singer & A. M. Viens (eds.), The Cambridge Textbook of Bioethics. Cambridge University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  20
    The Vital Importance of Implementation Ethics.Jerome Amir Singh - 2006 - Hastings Center Report 36 (3):3-3.
  7.  4
    Informed Consent and Community Engagement in Open Field Research: Lessons for Gene Drive Science.Jerome Amir Singh - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):54.
    The development of the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing system has generated new possibilities for the use of gene drive constructs to reduce or suppress mosquito populations to levels that do not support disease transmission. Despite this prospect, social resistance to genetically modified organisms remains high. Gene drive open field research thus raises important questions regarding what is owed to those who may not consent to such research, or those could be affected by the proposed research, but whose consent is not solicited. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  2
    How Over-Protectionism Can Evidence Unethical Outcomes: Examples From South Africa.Jerome Amir Singh - 2006 - Research Ethics 2 (2):63-66.
    South Africa has adopted a paternalistic stance on the minimum age of enrolment for HIV vaccine trials, and on the level of compensation for trial participants. Whilst this approach has presumably been taken to protect the interests of research participants an over-protective approach, however well-intended, does not always serve the interests of the particularly vulnerable. It will be argued that an inclusive approach, based on the principles of beneficence and justice, can better guide research in such a way that the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark