Results for 'Jennifer Smalligan Maru��i��'

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  1. Does Hume Hold a Dispositional Account of Belief?Jennifer Smalligan Marušić - 2010 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (2):155-183.
    Philosophical theories about the nature of belief can be roughly classified into two groups: those that treat beliefs as occurrent mental states or episodes and those that treat beliefs as dispositions. David Hume's A Treatise of Human Nature seems to contain a classic example of an occurrence theory of belief as he defines 'belief' as 'a lively idea related to or associated with a present impression' (Treatise 1.3.7.5 96). This definition suggests that believing is an occurrent mental state, such as (...)
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  2.  42
    Refuting The Whole System? Hume's Attack on Popular Religion in The Natural History of Religion.Jennifer Smalligan Marušić - 2012 - Philosophical Quarterly 62 (249):715-736.
    There is reason for genuine puzzlement about Hume's aim in ‘The Natural History of Religion’. Some commentators take the work to be merely a causal investigation into the psychological processes and environmental conditions that are likely to give rise to the first religions, an investigation that has no significant or straightforward implications for the rationality or justification of religious belief. Others take the work to constitute an attack on the rationality and justification of religious belief in general. In contrast to (...)
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  3.  68
    Hume on the Projection of Causal Necessity.Jennifer Smalligan Marušić - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (4):263-273.
    A characteristically Humean pattern of explanation starts by claiming that we have a certain kind of feeling in response to some objects and then takes our having such feelings to provide an explanation of how we come to think of those objects as having some feature that we would not otherwise be able to think of them as having. This core pattern of explanation is what leads Simon Blackburn to dub Hume ‘the first great projectivist.’ This paper critically examines the (...)
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  4.  52
    Comments on Michael Jacovides “How Berkeley Corrupted His Capacity to Conceive”.Jennifer Smalligan Marusic - 2009 - Philosophia 37 (3):431-436.
    The manuscript includes comments on Michael Jacovides’s paper, “How Berkeley Corrupted His Capacity to Conceive.” The paper and comments were delivered at the conference “Meaning and Modern Empiricism” held at Virginia Tech in April 2008. I consider Jacovides’s treatment of Berkeley’s Resemblance Argument and his interpretation of the Master Argument. In particular, I distinguish several ways of understanding the disagreement between Jacovides and Kenneth Winkler over the right way to read the Master Argument.
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  5.  36
    Belief and Introspective Knowledge in Treatise 1.3.7.Jennifer Smalligan Marušić - 2011 - Hume Studies 37 (1):99-122.
    Hume argues that the difference between belief and mere conception consists in a difference in the manner of conception. His argument assumes that the difference between belief and mere conception must be a function of either the content conceived or of the manner of conception; however, it is unclear what justifies this assumption. I argue that the assumption depends on Hume’s confidence that we can know immediately that we believe when we believe, and that we can only have such knowledge (...)
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  6.  97
    Propositions and Judgments in Locke and Arnauld: A Monstrous and Unholy Union?Jennifer Smalligan Marušić - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (2):255-280.
    Philosophers have accused locke of holding a view about propositions that simply conflates the formation of a propositional thought with the judgment that a proposition is true, and charged that this has obviously absurd consequences.1 Worse, this account appears not to be unique to Locke: it bears a striking resemblance to one found in both the Port-Royal Logic (the Logic, for short) and the Port-Royal Grammar. In the Logic, this account forms part of the backbone of the traditional logic expounded (...)
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  7. Berkeley on the Objects of Perception.Jennifer Smalligan Marušić - 2018 - In Stefan Storrie (ed.), Berkeley's Three Dialogues: New Essays. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 40-60.
     
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  8.  15
    Dugald Stewart on Conjectural History and Human Nature.Jennifer Smalligan Marušić - 2017 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 15 (3):261-274.
    Dugald Stewart claims that conjectural history is ‘the peculiar glory of the latter half of the eighteenth century’. Yet it is hard to see why, in his view, conjectural histories are not merely confabulated just-so stories. This paper examines Stewart's views about the epistemic and moral value of conjectural history.
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  9.  11
    Hume: A Very Short Introduction.Jennifer Smalligan Marušić - forthcoming - British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-4.
    In his Hume: A Very Short Introduction, James Harris describes Hume’s shift away from systematic philosophizing and towards the writing of essays, as a genre more “suitable to the literary culture...
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  10.  28
    Reflection and the Stability of Belief: Essays on Descartes, Hume and Reid.Jennifer Smalligan Marušić - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (4):800-803.
  11.  76
    Locke's Simple Account of Sensitive Knowledge.Jennifer Smalligan Marušić - 2016 - Philosophical Review 125 (2):205-239.
    Locke seems to hold that we have knowledge of the existence of external objects through sensation. Two problems face Locke's account. The first problem concerns the logical form of knowledge of real existence. Locke defines knowledge as the perception of the agreement or disagreement between ideas. However, perceiving agreements between ideas seems to yield knowledge only of analytic truths, not propositions about existence. The second problem concerns the epistemic status of sensitive knowledge: How could the senses yield certain knowledge? This (...)
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  12.  17
    Empathy as an Antecedent of Social Justice Attitudes and Perceptions.Matthew Cartabuke, James W. Westerman, Jacqueline Z. Bergman, Brian G. Whitaker, Jennifer Westerman & Rafik I. Beekun - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 157 (3):605-615.
    At the same time that social justice concerns are on the rise on college campuses, empathy levels among US college students are falling. Social injustice resulting from organizational decisions and actions causes profound and unnecessary human suffering, and research to understand antecedents to these decisions and actions lacks attention. Empathy represents a potential tool and critical skill for organizational decision-makers, with empirical evidence linking empathy to moral recognition of ethical situations and greater breadth of understanding of stakeholder impact and improved (...)
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  13.  11
    Making Our Measures Match Perceptions: Do Severity and Type Matter When Assessing Academic Misconduct Offenses?Thomas H. Stone, Jennifer L. Kisamore, I. M. Jawahar & Jocelyn Holden Bolin - 2014 - Journal of Academic Ethics 12 (4):251-270.
    Traditional approaches to measurement of violations of academic integrity may overestimate the magnitude and severity of cheating and confound panic with planned cheating. Differences in the severity and level of premeditation of academic integrity violations have largely been unexamined. Results of a study based on a combined sample of business students showed that students are more likely to commit minor cheating offenses and engage in panic-based cheating as compared to serious and planned cheating offenses. Results also indicated there is a (...)
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  14.  9
    Do Birds of a Feather Cheat Together? How Personality and Relationships Affect Student Cheating.Alex J. Scrimpshire, Thomas H. Stone, Jennifer L. Kisamore & I. M. Jawahar - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (1):1-22.
    Academic misconduct is widespread in schools, colleges, and universities and it appears to be an international phenomenon that also spills over into the workplace. To this end, while a great deal of research has investigated various individual components such as, demographic, personality and situational factors that contribute to cheating, research has yet to examine why students help others cheat and which students are being asked to help others cheat. In this study, we investigated if the closeness of the relationship to (...)
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  15.  83
    Academic Integrity: The Relationship Between Individual and Situational Factors on Misconduct Contemplations.Jennifer L. Kisamore, Thomas H. Stone & I. M. Jawahar - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 75 (4):381-394.
    Recent, well-publicized scandals, involving unethical conduct have rekindled interest in academic misconduct. Prior studies of academic misconduct have focussed exclusively on situational factors (e.g., integrity culture, honor codes), demographic variables or personality constructs. We contend that it is important to also examine how␣these classes of variables interact to influence perceptions of and intentions relating to academic misconduct. In a sample of 217 business students, we examined how integrity culture interacts with Prudence and Adjustment to explain variance in estimated frequency of (...)
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  16.  64
    Group Belief: Lessons From Lies and Bullshit.I.—Jennifer Lackey - 2020 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 94 (1):185-208.
    Groups and other sorts of collective entities are frequently said to believe things. Sarah Huckabee Sanders, for instance, was asked by reporters at White House press conferences whether the Trump administration ‘believes in climate change’ or ‘believes that slavery is wrong’. Similarly, it is said on the website of the Aclu of Illinois that the organization ‘firmly believes that rights should not be limited based on a person’s sexual orientation or gender identity’. A widespread philosophical view is that belief on (...)
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  17.  2
    Extending the Reach of Tooling Theory: A Neurocognitive and Phylogenetic Perspective.Jennifer A. D. Colbourne, Alice M. I. Auersperg, Megan L. Lambert, Ludwig Huber & Christoph J. Völter - 2021 - Topics in Cognitive Science 13 (4):548-572.
  18.  29
    Plural but Equal: Group Identity and Voluntary Integration*: Jennifer Roback.Jennifer Roback - 1991 - Social Philosophy and Policy 8 (2):60-80.
    During this period, when disciples were growing in number, a grievance arose on the part of those who spoke Greek, against those who spoke the language of the Jews; they complained that their widows were being overlooked in the daily distribution. When Americans think of ethnic conflict, conflict between blacks and whites comes to mind most immediately. Yet ethnic conflict is pervasive around the world. Azerbijanis and Turks in the Soviet Union; Catholics and Protestants in Northern Ireland; Arabs and Jews (...)
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  19.  5
    Brain Computer Interfaces and Communication Disabilities: Ethical, Legal, and Social Aspects of Decoding Speech From the Brain.Jennifer A. Chandler, Kiah I. Van der Loos, Susan Boehnke, Jonas S. Beaudry, Daniel Z. Buchman & Judy Illes - 2022 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 16.
    A brain-computer interface technology that can decode the neural signals associated with attempted but unarticulated speech could offer a future efficient means of communication for people with severe motor impairments. Recent demonstrations have validated this approach. Here we assume that it will be possible in future to decode imagined speech in people with severe motor impairments, and we consider the characteristics that could maximize the social utility of a BCI for communication. As a social interaction, communication involves the needs and (...)
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  20.  22
    Tickle Me, I Think I Might Be Dreaming! Sensory Attenuation, Self-Other Distinction, and Predictive Processing in Lucid Dreams.Jennifer M. Windt, Dominic L. Harkness & Bigna Lenggenhager - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  21.  21
    Know My Own Mind? I Should Be so Lucky!Jennifer M. Gurd & John C. Marshall - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):47-48.
  22.  9
    Fracture Mode, Microstructure and Temperature-Dependent Elastic Moduli for Thermoelectric Composites of PbTe–PbS with SiC Nanoparticle Additions.Jennifer E. Ni, Eldon D. Case, Robert D. Schmidt, Chun-I. Wu, Timothy P. Hogan, Rosa M. Trejo, Edgar Lara-Curzio & Mercouri G. Kanatzidis - 2013 - Philosophical Magazine 93 (35):4412-4439.
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  23.  21
    What I Talk About When I Talk About Running; A Memoir.Jennifer Burr - 2010 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (3):361-364.
  24.  13
    A Case for Preserving the Diversity of Madness.Jennifer C. Sarrett & Howard I. Kushner - 2011 - Annals of Science 68 (4):547-554.
    Summary Watters questions the universality of mental illness and warns of the harms that accompany the exportation of Western typologies to non-Western cultures. He is particularly concerned that these effects will be exacerbated by the upcoming revisions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V). Building on his examination of non-Western practices, Watters exposes the historical instability of mental health classifications in North America to question the validity of current DSM categories. Although Watters' warnings about the dangers of (...)
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  25.  8
    Elizabeth I, Patriotism, and the Imagined Nation in Three Eighteenth-Century Plays.Jennifer Clement - 2012 - Intellectual History Review 22 (3):391-410.
  26. Should Morality Be Abolished? An Empirical Challenge to the Argument From Intolerance.Jennifer Cole Wright & Thomas Pölzler - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (3):350-385.
    Moral abolitionists claim that morality ought to be abolished. According to one of their most prominent arguments, this is because making moral judgments renders people significantly less tolerant toward anyone who holds divergent views. In this paper we investigate the hypothesis that morality’s tolerance-decreasing effect only occurs if people are realists about moral issues, i.e., they interpret these issues as objectively grounded. We found support for this hypothesis (Studies 1 and 2). Yet, it also turned out that the intolerance associated (...)
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  27.  56
    Reducing Implicit Racial Preferences: I. A Comparative Investigation of 17 Interventions.Calvin K. Lai, Maddalena Marini, Steven A. Lehr, Carlo Cerruti, Jiyun-Elizabeth L. Shin, Jennifer A. Joy-Gaba, Arnold K. Ho, Bethany A. Teachman, Sean P. Wojcik, Spassena P. Koleva, Rebecca S. Frazier, Larisa Heiphetz, Eva E. Chen, Rhiannon N. Turner, Jonathan Haidt, Selin Kesebir, Carlee Beth Hawkins, Hillary S. Schaefer, Sandro Rubichi, Giuseppe Sartori, Christopher M. Dial, N. Sriram, Mahzarin R. Banaji & Brian A. Nosek - 2014 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (4):1765-1785.
  28.  18
    Teacher-Practitioner Multiple-Role Issues in Sport Psychology.I. I. Watson, Damien Clement, Brandonn Harris, Thad R. Leffingwell & Jennifer Hurst - 2006 - Ethics and Behavior 16 (1):41 – 59.
    The potential for the occurrence of multiple-role relationships is increased when professors also consult with athletic teams on their campuses. Such multiple-role relationships have potential ethical implications that are unclear and largely unexplored, and consultants may find multiple-role relationships both difficult to deal with and unavoidable. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the nature of teacher-practitioner multiple-role relationships. Participants (N = 35) were recruited from Association for the Advancement of Applied Sport Psychology (AAASP) certified consultants (CCs) who (...)
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  29.  24
    Where Do I Come From? Metaphors in Sex Education Picture Books for Young Children in China.Jennifer Yameng Liang, Kay O’Halloran & Sabine Tan - 2016 - Metaphor and Symbol 31 (3):179-193.
    ABSTRACTThis study examines the types of verbal, pictorial, and multimodal metaphors in the genre of sex education picture books for young children in Mainland China. Although being an educational discourse genre that is essentially concerned with transmitting scientific facts, sex education picture books employ a range of metaphors that categorize and construe the biological knowledge of human reproduction in a way that not only facilitates young children’s understanding of scientific concepts but also instills in them particular values and moralities that (...)
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  30.  9
    “I Don’T Want to Go on Living This Way”: Desire for Hastened Death and the Ethics of Involuntary Hospitalization.Jennifer K. Wagner, F. Daniel Davis, Joseph Venditto, Andreea Bucaloiu, Andrei Nemoianu & Kasia Tolwinski - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (10):88-90.
    Volume 19, Issue 10, October 2019, Page 88-90.
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  31.  10
    I & II Thessalonians: A Commentary by M. Eugene Boring. [REVIEW]Jennifer Houston McNeel - 2017 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 71 (1):89-91.
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  32. Why We Don’T Deserve Credit for Everything We Know.Jennifer Lackey - 2007 - Synthese 158 (3):345-361.
    A view of knowledge—what I call the "Deserving Credit View of Knowledge" —found in much of the recent epistemological literature, particularly among so-called virtue epistemologists, centres around the thesis that knowledge is something for which a subject deserves credit. Indeed, this is said to be the central difference between those true beliefs that qualify as knowledge and those that are true merely by luck—the former, unlike the latter, are achievements of the subject and are thereby creditable to her. Moreover, it (...)
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  33. Asymmetries in Judgments of Responsibility and Intentional Action.Jennifer Cole Wright & John Bengson - 2009 - Mind and Language 24 (1):24-50.
    Abstract: Recent experimental research on the 'Knobe effect' suggests, somewhat surprisingly, that there is a bi-directional relation between attributions of intentional action and evaluative considerations. We defend a novel account of this phenomenon that exploits two factors: (i) an intuitive asymmetry in judgments of responsibility (e.g. praise/blame) and (ii) the fact that intentionality commonly connects the evaluative status of actions to the responsibility of actors. We present the results of several new studies that provide empirical evidence in support of this (...)
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  34. Re-Thinking Intersectionality.Jennifer C. Nash - 2008 - Feminist Review 89 (1):1-15.
    Intersectionality has become the primary analytic tool that feminist and anti-racist scholars deploy for theorizing identity and oppression. This paper exposes and critically interrogates the assumptions underpinning intersectionality by focusing on four tensions within intersectionality scholarship: the lack of a defined intersectional methodology; the use of black women as quintessential intersectional subjects; the vague definition of intersectionality; and the empirical validity of intersectionality. Ultimately, my project does not seek to undermine intersectionality; instead, I encourage both feminist and anti-racist scholars to (...)
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  35.  38
    Learning From Words.Jennifer Lackey - 2009 - Analysis 69 (3):572-574.
    While much of our knowledge relies on testimony or the words of others, until recently few philosophers had much to say about the nature of testimony or how we learn from another's words, but testimony has now become a popular topic. Jennifer Lackey's Learning from Words: Testimony as a Source of Knowledge is a useful and intelligent guide, a well informed and appreciative but critical and provocative commentary on a large and growing body of literature.According to Lackey, most of (...)
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  36.  13
    " If My Husband Calls I'm Not Here": The Beauty Parlor as Real and Representational Female Space.Jennifer Scanlon - 2007 - Feminist Studies 33 (2):308-334.
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  37. Epistemic Utility Theory and the Aim of Belief.Jennifer Rose Carr - 2017 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 95 (3):511-534.
    How should rational believers pursue the aim of truth? Epistemic utility theorists have argued that by combining the tools of decision theory with an epistemic form of value—gradational accuracy, proximity to the truth—we can justify various epistemological norms. I argue that deriving these results requires using decision rules that are different in important respects from those used in standard (practical) decision theory. If we use the more familiar decision rules, we can’t justify the epistemic coherence norms that epistemic utility theory (...)
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  38.  43
    On the Possibility of Corporate Apologies.Andrew I. Cohen & Jennifer A. Samp - 2013 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (6):741-762.
    This paper argues against an individualist challenge to the possibility of corporate apologies. According to this challenge, corporations always and only act through their members; thus they are not the sorts of entities that can apologize. Consequently there can be no corporate apologies. Against this challenge, this paper argues that even if corporate acts can be analyzed as acts by individuals within certain relationships, there can still be corporate apologies. This paper offers a noneliminative individualist account of such apologies. The (...)
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  39. Testimonial Knowledge and Transmission.Jennifer Lackey - 1999 - Philosophical Quarterly 49 (197):471-490.
    We often talk about knowledge being transmitted via testimony. This suggests a picture of testimony with striking similarities to memory. For instance, it is often assumed that neither is a generative source of knowledge: while the former transmits knowledge from one speaker to another, the latter preserves beliefs from one time to another. These considerations give rise to a stronger and a weaker thesis regarding the transmission of testimonial knowledge. The stronger thesis is that each speaker in a chain of (...)
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  40. Knowledge and Credit.Jennifer Lackey - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 142 (1):27 - 42.
    A widely accepted view in recent work in epistemology is that knowledge is a cognitive achievement that is properly creditable to those subjects who possess it. More precisely, according to the Credit View of Knowledge, if S knows that p, then S deserves credit for truly believing that p. In spite of its intuitive appeal and explanatory power, I have elsewhere argued that the Credit View is false. Various responses have been offered to my argument and I here consider each (...)
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  41. Lies and Deception: An Unhappy Divorce.Jennifer Lackey - 2013 - Analysis 73 (2):236-248.
    The traditional view of lying holds that this phenomenon involves two central components: stating what one does not believe oneself and doing so with the intention to deceive. This view remained the generally accepted view of the nature of lying until very recently, with the intention-to-deceive requirement now coming under repeated attack. In this article, I argue that the tides have turned too quickly in the literature on lying. For while it is indeed true that there can be lies where (...)
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  42. “I Am an Instrument of God “: Religious Belief, Atheism, and Meaning.Jason T. Eberl & Jennifer A. Vines - 2008 - In Battlestar Galactica and Philosophy: Knowledge Here Begins Out There. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Examines theism versus atheism as depicted in the re-imagined sci-fi series Battlestar Galactica.
     
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  43.  79
    You Can See What 'I' Means.Jennifer Matey - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 162 (1):57-70.
    This paper takes up the question of whether we can visually represent something as having semantic value. Something has semantic value if it represents some property, thing or concept. An argument is offered that we can represent semantic value based on a variety of number-color synesthesia. This argument is shown to withstand several objections that can be lodged against the popular arguments from phenomenal contrast and from the mundane example of reading.
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  44. What Luck is Not.Jennifer Lackey - 2008 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 86 (2):255 – 267.
    In this paper, I critically examine the two dominant views of the concept of luck in the current literature: lack of control accounts and modal accounts. In particular, I argue that the conditions proposed by such views—that is, a lack of control and the absence of counterfactual robustness—are neither necessary nor sufficient for an event's being lucky. Hence, I conclude that the two main accounts in the current literature both fail to capture what is distinctive of, and central to, the (...)
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  45. Group Assertion.Jennifer Lackey - 2018 - Erkenntnis 83 (1):21-42.
    In this paper, I provide the framework for an account of group assertion. On my view, there are two kinds of group assertion, coordinated and authority-based, with authority-based group assertion being the core notion. I argue against a deflationary view, according to which a group’s asserting is understood in terms of individual assertions, by showing that a group can assert a proposition even when no individual does. Instead, I argue on behalf of an inflationary view, according to which it is (...)
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  46.  6
    Catecholaminergic Modulation of the Avoidance of Cognitive Control.Monja I. Froböse, Jennifer C. Swart, Jennifer L. Cook, Dirk E. M. Geurts, Hanneke E. M. den Ouden & Roshan Cools - 2018 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 147 (12):1763-1781.
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  47.  20
    Semantički Eksternalizam, Samospoznaja I Slow Switching.Jennifer W. Mulnix - 2011 - Synthesis Philosophica 26 (2):375-390.
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  48. Conceptual Engineering, Truth, and Efficacy.Jennifer Nado - 2019 - Synthese 198 (Suppl 7):1507-1527.
    Traditional views on philosophical methodology characterize our primary philosophical goal as production of a successful conceptual analysis. The notion of conceptual analysis, however, faces several challenges—from experimental philosophy to more traditional worries such as the paradox of analysis. This paper explores an alternate approach, commonly called conceptual engineering, which aims at recommending conceptual revisions. An important question for the conceptual engineer is as follows: what counts as a case of successful conceptual engineering? What sorts of revisions are permitted, and what (...)
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  49. A Justificationist View of Disagreement’s Epistemic Significance.Jennifer Lackey - 2008 - In Alan Millar Adrian Haddock & Duncan Pritchard (eds.), Social Epistemology. Oxford University Press. pp. 145-154.
    The question that will be the focus of this paper is this: what is the significance of disagreement between those who are epistemic peers? There are two answers to this question found in the recent literature. On the one hand, there are those who hold that one can continue to rationally believe that p despite the fact that one’s epistemic peer explicitly believes that not-p. I shall call those who hold this view nonconformists. In contrast, there are those who hold (...)
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  50. Racial Figleaves, the Shifting Boundaries of the Permissible, and the Rise of Donald Trump.Jennifer M. Saul - 2017 - Philosophical Topics 45 (2):97-116.
    The rise to power of Donald Trump has been shocking in many ways. One of these was that it disrupted the preexisting consensus that overt racism would be death to a national political campaign. In this paper, I argue that Trump made use of what I call “racial figleaves”—additional utterances that provide just enough cover to give reassurance to voters who are racially resentful but don’t wish to see themselves as racist. These figleaves also, I argue, play a key role (...)
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