14 found
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Jennifer M. Windt [12]Jennifer Michelle Windt [2]
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Jennifer M. Windt
Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz
Jennifer Windt
Monash University
  1.  45
    Does Consciousness Disappear in Dreamless Sleep?Jennifer M. Windt, Tore Nielsen & Evan Thompson - 2016 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 20 (12):871-882.
  2.  85
    Predictive Brains, Dreaming Selves, Sleeping Bodies: How the Analysis of Dream Movement Can Inform a Theory of Self- and World-Simulation in Dreams.Jennifer M. Windt - 2018 - Synthese 195 (6):2577-2625.
    In this paper, I discuss the relationship between bodily experiences in dreams and the sleeping, physical body. I question the popular view that dreaming is a naturally and frequently occurring real-world example of cranial envatment. This view states that dreams are functionally disembodied states: in a majority of dreams, phenomenal experience, including the phenomenology of embodied selfhood, unfolds completely independently of external and peripheral stimuli and outward movement. I advance an alternative and more empirically plausible view of dreams as weakly (...)
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  3. The Immersive Spatiotemporal Hallucination Model of Dreaming.Jennifer M. Windt - 2010 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (2):295-316.
    The paper proposes a minimal definition of dreaming in terms of immersive spatiotemporal hallucination (ISTH) occurring in sleep or during sleep–wake transitions and under the assumption of reportability. I take these conditions to be both necessary and sufficient for dreaming to arise. While empirical research results may, in the future, allow for an extension of the concept of dreaming beyond sleep and possibly even independently of reportability, ISTH is part of any possible extension of this definition and thus is a (...)
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  4. The Philosophy of Dreaming and Self-Consciousness: What Happens to the Experiential Subject During the Dream State?Jennifer Michelle Windt & Thomas Metzinger - 2007 - In Deirdre Barrett & Patrick McNamara (eds.), The New Science of Dreaming Vol 3: Cultural and Theoretical Perspectives. Praeger Publishers/Greenwood Publishing Group. pp. 193-247.
  5. How to Integrate Dreaming Into a General Theory of Consciousness—A Critical Review of Existing Positions and Suggestions for Future Research.Jennifer M. Windt & Valdas Noreika - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1091-1107.
    In this paper, we address the different ways in which dream research can contribute to interdisciplinary consciousness research. As a second global state of consciousness aside from wakefulness, dreaming is an important contrast condition for theories of waking consciousness. However, programmatic suggestions for integrating dreaming into broader theories of consciousness, for instance by regarding dreams as a model system of standard or pathological wake states, have not yielded straightforward results. We review existing proposals for using dreaming as a model system, (...)
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  6.  12
    Silence in Shamatha, Transcendental, and Stillness Meditation: An Evidence Synthesis Based on Expert Texts.Toby J. Woods, Jennifer M. Windt & Olivia Carter - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
  7.  5
    The path to contentless experience in meditation: An evidence synthesis based on expert texts.Toby J. Woods, Jennifer M. Windt & Olivia Carter - forthcoming - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-38.
    In contentless experience there is an absence of mental content such as thought, perception, and mental imagery. The path to contentless experience in meditation can be taken to comprise the meditation technique, and the experiences on the way to the contentless “goal-state/s”. Shamatha, Transcendental, and Stillness Meditation are each said to access contentless experience, but the path to that experience in each practice is not yet well understood from a scientific perspective. We have employed evidence synthesis to select and review (...)
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  8.  22
    Tickle Me, I Think I Might Be Dreaming! Sensory Attenuation, Self-Other Distinction, and Predictive Processing in Lucid Dreams.Jennifer M. Windt, Dominic L. Harkness & Bigna Lenggenhager - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  9.  1
    Evidence synthesis indicates contentless experiences in meditation are neither truly contentless nor identical.Toby J. Woods, Jennifer M. Windt & Olivia Carter - forthcoming - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-52.
    Contentless experience involves an absence of mental content such as thought, perception, and mental imagery. In academic work it has been classically treated as including states like those aimed for in Shamatha, Transcendental, and Stillness Meditation. We have used evidence synthesis to select and review 135 expert texts from within the three traditions. In this paper we identify the features of contentless experience referred to in the expert texts and determine whether the experiences are the same or different across the (...)
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  10.  39
    Minding the Dream Self: Perspectives From the Analysis of Self-Experience in Dreams.Jennifer Michelle Windt - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (6):633-633.
  11.  35
    Consciousness in Sleep: How Findings From Sleep and Dream Research Challenge Our Understanding of Sleep, Waking, and Consciousness.Jennifer M. Windt - 2020 - Philosophy Compass 15 (4).
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  12. Altered Consciousness in Philosophy.Jennifer M. Windt - 2011 - In E. Cardeña & M. Winkelman (ed.), Altering Consciousness. Multidisciplinary Perspectives. Praeger..
     
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  13.  24
    Dreaming, Imagining, and First-Person Methods in Philosophy: Commentary on Evan Thompson's Waking, Dreaming, Being.Jennifer M. Windt - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (3):959-981.
    Evan’s book is in many ways an exercise in remapping. The first is suggested by the book’s title. Waking, Dreaming, Being challenges existing ways of mapping the conceptual relationship between conscious states across the sleep-wake cycle. The idea that waking and dreaming are not discrete states but can interpenetrate each other—that, to use Evan’s words, they “aren’t opposed but flow into and out of [one] an other” —is a central theme running through the book. If Evan is correct, then the (...)
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  14.  6
    Teaching and Learning Guide For: Consciousness in Sleep: How Findings From Sleep and Dream Research Challenge Our Understanding of Sleep, Waking, and Consciousness.Jennifer M. Windt - 2020 - Philosophy Compass 15 (9):1-4.
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