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Jennifer Keefe [4]Jennifer J. Keefe [1]
  1.  24
    Ferrier, Common Sense and Consciousness.Jennifer Keefe - 2007 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 5 (2):169-185.
    James Frederick Ferrier developed his philosophy from a common sense background. However, his rejection of common sense philosophy in particular and Enlightenment philosophy in general results in the development of a system of idealism. In his series of lectures ‘An Introduction to the Philosophy of Consciousness - Parts I to VII’, which appeared in Blackwoods Magazine (1838–39), he outlines the problem with modern philosophy and argues that philosophy should follow a new direction. In his view, the most peculiar and interesting (...)
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  2.  13
    Douglas McDermid, The Rise and Fall of Common Sense Realism.Jennifer J. Keefe - 2019 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 17 (2):184-189.
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  3. James Frederick Ferrier: Selected Writings.Jennifer Keefe (ed.) - 2011 - Imprint Academic.
    This volume contains selections from the philosophical writings of James Frederick Ferrier. Ferrier was the Professor of Moral Philosophy at the University of St Andrews between 1845 and 1864 and he was one of the earliest post-Hegelian British idealists. He develops a system of absolute idealism via a rejection of the Scottish school of common sense and Enlightenment philosophy in general. These selections focus on his primary philosophical interests: epistemology and ontology. Ferrier denies the possibility of a science of man (...)
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    The Scottish Idealists: Absolute Idealism and Personal Idealism.Jennifer Keefe - 2019 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 17 (3):227-240.
    From the mid-nineteenth century to the early twentieth century British Idealism was a leading school of philosophical thought and the Scottish Idealists made important contributions to this philosophical school. In Scotland, there were two types of post-Hegelian idealism: Absolute Idealism and Personal Idealism. This article will show the ways in which these philosophical systems arose by focusing on their leading representatives: Edward Caird and Andrew Seth Pringle-Pattison.
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