Results for 'Jeffrey Todd Berger'

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  1.  20
    Health Disparities, Systemic Racism, and Failures of Cultural Competence: Authors’ Response to Commentaries.Jeffrey Todd Berger & Dana Ribeiro Miller - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (9):1-3.
    The health system is, in particular ways, a microcosm of society and both reflects and contributes to its ills of racism, inequities, and disparities. As such, the house of medicine is obligated to...
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  2.  20
    Encyclopedia of Contemporary German Culture (review).Jeffrey Todd Adams - 2003 - Symploke 11 (1):269-270.
  3.  13
    Context processing in older adults: evidence for a theory relating cognitive control to neurobiology in healthy aging.Todd S. Braver, Deanna M. Barch, Beth A. Keys, Cameron S. Carter, Jonathan D. Cohen, Jeffrey A. Kaye, Jeri S. Janowsky, Stephan F. Taylor, Jerome A. Yesavage & Martin S. Mumenthaler - 2001 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 130 (4):746.
  4.  59
    Health Disparities, Systemic Racism, and Failures of Cultural Competence.Jeffrey T. Berger & Dana Ribeiro Miller - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (9):4-10.
    Health disparities are primarily driven by structural inequality including systemic racism. Medical educators, led by the AAMC, have tended to minimize these core drivers of health disparities. Ins...
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  5.  10
    Marginally Represented Patients and the Moral Authority of Surrogates.Jeffrey T. Berger - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (2):44-48.
    Incapacitated adult patients are commonly divided into two groups for purposes of decision making; those with a surrogate and those without. Respectively, these groups are often referred to as represented and unrepresented, and the relative ethics of decision making between them raises two particular issues. The first issue involves the differential application of the best interests standard between groups. Second is the prevailing notion that representedness and unrepresentedness are categorical phenomena, though it is more aptly understood as a multidimensional and (...)
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  6.  15
    Marginally Represented Patients and the Moral Authority of Surrogates.Jeffrey T. Berger - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (3):W1-W2.
    Volume 20, Issue 3, March 2020, Page W1-W2.
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  7.  29
    Corona and Community: The Entrenchment of Structural Bias in Planning for Pandemic Preparedness.Jeffrey T. Berger & Dana Ribeiro Miller - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (7):112-114.
    Volume 20, Issue 7, July 2020, Page 112-114.
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  8.  60
    The Limits of Surrogates’ Moral Authority and Physician Professionalism: Can the Paradigm of Palliative Sedation Be Instructive?Jeffrey T. Berger - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (1):20-23.
    With narrow exception, physicians’ treatment of incapacitated patients requires the consent of health surrogates. Although the decision-making authority of surrogates is appropriately broad, their moral authority is not without limits. Discerning these bounds is particularly germane to ethically complex treatments and has important implications for the welfare of patients, for the professional integrity of clinicians, and, in fact, for the welfare of surrogates. Palliative sedation is one such complex treatment; as such, it provides a valuable model for analyzing the scope (...)
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  9.  5
    Rethinking Guidelines for the Use of Palliative Sedation.Jeffrey T. Berger - 2010 - Hastings Center Report 40 (3):32-38.
    Current guidelines treat palliative sedation to unconsciousness as an effective medical treatment for terminally ill patients who need relief from severe symptoms, yet also restrict its use in ways that are extraordinary for medical treatments. A closer look at the kinds of cases in which palliative sedation is used suggests a way of adjusting the guidelines to resolve this seeming contradiction.
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  10.  7
    Is best interests a relevant decision making standard for enrolling non-capacitated subjects into clinical research?Jeffrey T. Berger - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (1):45-49.
    The ‘best interests’ decision making standard is used in clinical care to make necessary health decisions for non-capacitated individuals for whom neither explicit nor inferred wishes are known. It has been also widely acknowledged as a basis for enrolling some non-capacitated adults into clinical research such as emergency, critical care, and dementia research. However, the best interests standard requires that choices provide the highest net benefit of available options, and clinical research rarely meets this criterion. In the context of modern (...)
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  11.  12
    What about process? Limitations in advance directives, care planning, and noncapacitated decision making.Jeffrey T. Berger - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (4):33 – 34.
    Just as noncapacitated decision making will forever be a feature of clinical medicine, so will the quest for effective advance care planning and serviceable documentation of these preferences. “Re-...
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  12.  10
    A Computational Model of Event Segmentation From Perceptual Prediction.Jeremy R. Reynolds, Jeffrey M. Zacks & Todd S. Braver - 2007 - Cognitive Science 31 (4):613-643.
    People tend to perceive ongoing continuous activity as series of discrete events. This partitioning of continuous activity may occur, in part, because events correspond to dynamic patterns that have recurred across different contexts. Recurring patterns may lead to reliable sequential dependencies in observers' experiences, which then can be used to guide perception. The current set of simulations investigated whether this statistical structure within events can be used 1) to develop stable internal representations that facilitate perception and 2) to learn when (...)
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  13.  1
    Patients’ Concerns for Family Burden: A Nonconforming Preference in Standards for Surrogate Decision Making.Jeffrey T. Berger - 2009 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 20 (2):158-161.
  14.  3
    Patients’ Interests in their Family Members’ Well-Being: An Overlooked, Fundamental Consideration within Substituted Judgments.Jeffrey T. Berger - 2005 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 16 (1):3-10.
  15.  13
    Say what you mean and mean what you say: A patient's conflicting preferences for care.Jeffrey T. Berger & Martin Gunderson - 2006 - Hastings Center Report 36 (1):14-15.
  16.  4
    Suffering in Advanced Dementia: Diagnostic and Treatment Challenges and Questions about Palliative Sedation.Jeffrey T. Berger - 2006 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 17 (4):364-366.
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  17.  25
    The Ethics of Mandatory HIV Testing in Newborns.Jeffrey T. Berger, Fred Rosner & Peter Farnsworth - 1996 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 7 (1):77-84.
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  18.  7
    The Reporting of Informed Consent and Related Issues in Critical-Care Research.Jeffrey T. Berger, Edward Khalil, Samar Khan & Tony Varghese - 2008 - Research Ethics 4 (1):10-14.
    Background: Previous studies have found lapses in ethical safeguards for subjects of critical-care research. Objective: To assess recently published empiric critical-care research conducted in the United States for the reporting of research protections as they relate to informed consent and surrogate decision-making. Methods: Systematic review of a sample of empiric critical-care research studies published between 2000 and 2004. Results: Of 51 studies reviewed, consent was reported as having been obtained in 44. Assessment of subjects' decision-making capacity was noted in 35% (...)
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  19. To" Sleep Until Death" Reply.Jeffrey T. Berger - 2011 - Hastings Center Report 41 (1):4-5.
     
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  20.  13
    When Surrogates’ Responsibilities and Religious Concerns Intersect.Jeffrey T. Berger - 2007 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 18 (4):391-393.
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  21.  39
    Writing To Learn In Philosophy.Jeffrey Berger - 1984 - Teaching Philosophy 7 (3):217-222.
  22.  39
    Courage, Context, and Contemporary Health Care.Jeffrey T. Berger - 2015 - Hastings Center Report 45 (6):4-4.
    A commentary on “Must We Be Courageous?,” by Ann Hamric, John Arras, and Margaret Mohrmann, and on “Patient-Satisfaction Surveys on a Scale of 0 to 10: Improving Health Care, or Leading It Astray?,” by Alexandra Junewicz and Stuart J. Youngner, bothin the May-June 2015 issue.
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  23.  38
    Denial and Dyads: Patients Whose Surrogates and Physicians Are Unrealistically Optimistic.Jeffrey T. Berger & Dana Ribeiro Miller - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (9):29-31.
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  24.  4
    The Proportionate Value of Proportionality in Palliative Sedation.Jeffrey T. Berger - 2014 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 25 (3):219-221.
    Proportionality, as it pertains to palliative sedation, is the notion that sedation should be induced at the lowest degree effective for symptom control, so that the patient’s consciousness may be preserved. The pursuit of proportionality in palliative sedation is a widely accepted imperative advocated in position statements and guidelines on this treatment. The priority assigned to the pursuit of proportionality, and the extent to which it is relevant for patients who qualify for palliative sedation, have been overstated.
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  25.  24
    The Unfinished Business of Developing Standards for End-of-Life Care: Leveraging Quality Improvement and Peer Review.Jeffrey T. Berger - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (8):50-51.
  26.  2
    Cultural Discrimination in Mechanisms for Health Decisions: A View from New York.Jeffrey T. Berger - 1998 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 9 (2):127-131.
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  27.  4
    Sexuality and Intimacy in the Nursing Home: A Romantic Couple of Mixed Cognitive Capacities.Jeffrey T. Berger - 2000 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 11 (4):309-313.
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  28.  3
    Stumbled, Fumbled, Bumbled, Grumbled, and Humbled: Looking Back at the Future History of Clinical Ethics.Jeffrey T. Berger - 2014 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 25 (2):96-101.
    This retrospective of the last quarter century of clinical ethics offers an examination of some of the areas in which it should focus, and refocus, attention in the next.
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  29.  1
    Do Elderly Persons’ Concerns for Family Burden Influence their Preferences for Future Participation in Dementia Research?S. Deborah Majerovitz & Jeffrey T. Berger - 2005 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 16 (2):108-115.
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  30.  6
    Professional, ethical, legal, and educational lessons in medicine: a problem based learning approach.Kirk Lalwani, Ira Todd Cohen, Ellen Y. Choi, Berklee Robins & Jeffrey R. Kirsch (eds.) - 2023 - New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    Professional, Ethical, Legal, and Educational Lessons in Medicine: A Problem Based Approach provides a comprehensive review of the complex and challenging field of professional medical practice. Its problem-based format incorporates a vast pool of practical, board-exam-style multiple-choice questions for self-assessment, and is an ideal resource for exam preparation as well as ongoing clinical education among trainees and clinicians The practice of medicine is not only about clinical care of patients. Physicians must navigate ethical conundrums, legal pitfalls, and quality improvement issues (...)
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  31.  16
    Advance Health Planning and Treatment Preferences among Recipients of Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators: An Exploratory Study.Jeffrey T. Berger, M. Gorski & T. Cohen - 2006 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 17 (1):72-78.
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  32.  5
    Bedside Ethics and Health System Catastrophe: Imagine If You Will ….Jeffrey T. Berger - 2010 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 21 (4):285-287.
    Preparations for large-scale disasters have tended to focus on triage schema, stockpiling of materials, and other logistical concerns. Less attention has been given to the myriad of distressing and almost unthinkable ethically charged dilemmas that will emerge at the bedside during a catastrophe, and how they may be best managed. Yet, it is these bedside issues that may limit or thwart the effectiveness of disaster planning, and, therefore, they ought to be carefully considered.
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  33.  62
    Conflict and quality-of-life concerns in the nursing home.Jeffrey T. Berger - 1996 - HEC Forum 8 (3):180-186.
  34.  3
    Commentary on Decision-Making at the End of Life.Jeffrey T. Berger - 2011 - Asian Bioethics Review 3 (2):127-130.
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  35.  1
    Clarifying the Ethics of Continuous Sedation.Jeffrey T. Berger - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):46 - 47.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 6, Page 46-47, June 2011.
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  36.  3
    Bedside Ethics and Health System Catastrophe: Imagine If You Will ….Jeffrey T. Berger - 2010 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 21 (4):285-287.
    Preparations for large-scale disasters have tended to focus on triage schema, stockpiling of materials, and other logistical concerns. Less attention has been given to the myriad of distressing and almost unthinkable ethically charged dilemmas that will emerge at the bedside during a catastrophe, and how they may be best managed. Yet, it is these bedside issues that may limit or thwart the effectiveness of disaster planning, and, therefore, they ought to be carefully considered.
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  37.  1
    Ethical Challenges Posed by Dementia and Driving.Jeffrey T. Berger & Fred Rosner - 2000 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 11 (4):304-308.
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  38.  2
    Françoise Baylis, Canada Research.Jeffrey T. Berger - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
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  39.  5
    Insult to Injury: Ethical Confusion in American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care.Jeffrey T. Berger - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (1):68-70.
    (2010). Insult to Injury: Ethical Confusion in American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 10, No. 1, pp. 68-70.
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  40.  24
    Imagining the Unthinkable, Illuminating the Present.Jeffrey T. Berger - 2011 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 22 (1):17-19.
    During a catastrophe that disables the health system, ethically charged situations will undoubtedly emerge that will challenge patients, relatives, clinicians, and others involved in health delivery. This second of two special sections of The Journal of Clinical Ethics includes discussions of the implications of a system collapse on particularly vulnerable member of society, children, pregnant women, and those who are socio-economically, culturally, and linguistically disempowered. Additionally, it offers insights into the processes used by committees to plan for catastrophic care.
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  41.  1
    Multi-cultural considerations and the American College of Physicians Ethics Manual.Jeffrey T. Berger - 2001 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 12 (4):375.
  42.  12
    Misadventures in CPR: Neglecting Nonmaleficent and Advocacy Obligations.Jeffrey T. Berger - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (11):20-21.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 11, Page 20-21, November 2011.
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  43.  1
    Obligations and Marginal Decisions in a Fair Health System.Jeffrey T. Berger - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (3):123-124.
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  44.  6
    Paternalistic Assumptions and a Purported Duty to Deceive.Jeffrey Berger - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (12):20-21.
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  45.  4
    Pharmaceutical Industry Influences on Physician Prescribing: Gifts, Quasi-Gifts, and Patient-Directed Gifts.Jeffrey T. Berger - 2003 - American Journal of Bioethics 3 (3):56-57.
  46.  5
    Pandemic Preparedness Planning: Will Provisions for Involuntary Termination of Life Support Invite Active Euthanasia?Jeffrey T. Berger - 2010 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 21 (4):308-311.
    A number of influential reports on influenza pandemic preparedness include recommendations for extra-autonomous decisions to withdraw mechanical ventilation from some patients, who might still benefit from this technology, when demand for ventilators exceeds supply. An unintended implication of recommendations for nonvoluntary and involuntary termination of life support is that it make pandemic preparedness plans vulnerable to patients’ claims for assisted suicide and active euthanasia. Supporters of nonvoluntary passive euthanasia need to articulate why it is both morally different and morally superior (...)
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  47.  2
    Resource Stewardship in Disasters: Alone at the Bedside.Jeffrey T. Berger - 2012 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 23 (4):336-337.
    Discussions about resource allocation commonly invoke concerns of unfair and variable decisions when physicians ration at the bedside. This concern is no less germane in disaster medicine, in which physicians make triage and allocation decisions under duress, and patients and their families may be challenged to self-advocate. Unfortunately, a real-time mechanism to support a process for ethical decision making may not be available to medical relief workers. Yet, resources for ethics decision support can be important for the moral well-being of (...)
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  48.  3
    Medical futility: Towards consensus on disagreement. [REVIEW]Jeffrey T. Berger, Fred Rosner, Joel Potash, Pieter Kark, Peter Farnsworth & Allen J. Bennett - 1998 - HEC Forum 10 (1):102-118.
  49.  2
    An annotated bibliography of Byzantine studies.P. Schreiner, C. SCholz, P. Grossmann, Kristoffel Demoen, V. GjuzeleV, A. Berger, W. Brandes, F. TinneFeld, E. JEffreys, C. Jolivet-Levy, T. Kolias, J. Albani, S. Kalopissi-Verti, A. AcconciA Longo, E. KislingEr, W. Aerts, M. Grunbart, J. Koder, M. Hinterberger, Sv Bliznjuk, Jn Ljubarskij, M. SalaMon, J. Rosenqvist, J. Signes Codoner, A. YAsinovskyi, A. Cutler, W. Kaegi, Am Talbot, J. Diethart, E. Trapp, E. GamillschEg, B. Mondrain, A. BeihAmmer, A. Lohbeck, W. Seibt, F. Goria & S. TroianoS - 2001 - Byzantinische Zeitschrift 94 (1):375-539.
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  50.  6
    Self-Inflicted Moral Distress: Opportunity for a Fuller Exercise of Professionalism.Elizabeth Epstein, Ann B. Hamric & Jeffrey T. Berger - 2019 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 30 (4):314-317.
    Moral distress is a phenomenon increasingly recognized in healthcare that occurs when a clinician is unable to act in a manner consistent with his or her moral requirements due to external constraints. We contend that some experiences of moral distress are self-inflicted due to one’s under-assertion of professional authority, and these are potentially avoidable. In this article we outline causes of self-inflicted moral distress and offer recommendations for mitigation.
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