Results for 'Jeffrey Min Than Ling'

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  1.  11
    “Who is Watching the Watchdog?”: Ethical Perspectives of Sharing Health-Related Data for Precision Medicine in Singapore.Tamra Lysaght, Angela Ballantyne, Vicki Xafis, Serene Ong, Gerald Owen Schaefer, Jeffrey Min Than Ling, Ainsley J. Newson, Ing Wei Khor & E. Shyong Tai - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-11.
    Background We aimed to examine the ethical concerns Singaporeans have about sharing health-data for precision medicine and identify suggestions for governance strategies. Just as Asian genomes are under-represented in PM, the views of Asian populations about the risks and benefits of data sharing are under-represented in prior attitudinal research. Methods We conducted seven focus groups with 62 participants in Singapore from May to July 2019. They were conducted in three languages and analysed with qualitative content and thematic analysis. Results Four (...)
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  2.  1
    The Impact of Family Functioning on College Students’ Loneliness: Chain-Mediating Effects of Core Self-Evaluation and Problematic Mobile Phone Use.Ling Qian, Die Wang, Min Jiang, Wei Wu & Congying Ni - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    PurposeTo examine the influence of family functioning on college students’ loneliness and the mediating effects of core self-evaluation and problematic mobile phone use.MethodsFamily Function Scale, Core Self-evaluation Scale, Problem Mobile Phone Use Scale, and Loneliness Scale were used to investigate 8,524 college students.Results Family functioning positively predicted core self-evaluation and negatively predicted loneliness ; Core self-evaluation negatively predicted problematic mobile phone use and loneliness ; Problematic mobile phone use significantly positively predicted loneliness ; Core self-evaluation and problematic mobile phone use (...)
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  3.  36
    On the Common Saying That It is Better That ten Guilty Persons Escape Than That One Innocent Suffer: Pro and Con: Jeffrey Reiman and Ernest Van den Haag.Jeffrey Reiman - 1990 - Social Philosophy and Policy 7 (2):226-248.
    In Zadig, published in 1748, Voltaire wrote of “the great principle that it is better to run the risk of sparing the guilty than to condemn the innocent.” At about the same time, Blackstone noted approvingly that “the law holds that it is better that ten guilty persons escape, than that one innocent suffer.” In 1824, Thomas Fielding cited the principle as an Italian proverb and a maxim of English law. John Stuart Mill endorsed it in an address (...)
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  4.  36
    Evaluating the Role of the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex and Posterior Parietal Cortex in Memory-Guided Attention With Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.Min Wang, Ping Yang, Chaoyang Wan, Zhenlan Jin, Junjun Zhang & Ling Li - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  5.  45
    Differential Preparation Intervals Modulate Repetition Processes in Task Switching: An ERP Study.Min Wang, Ping Yang, Qian-Jing Zhao, Meng Wang, Zhenlan Jin & Ling Li - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  6.  6
    Perceptions of ‘Precision’ and ‘Personalised’ Medicine in Singapore and Associated Ethical Issues.Serene Ong, Jeffrey Ling, Angela Ballantyne, Tamra Lysaght & Vicki Xafis - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (2):179-194.
    Governments are investing in precision medicine with the aim of improving healthcare through the use of genomic analyses and data analytics to develop tailored treatment approaches for individual patients. The success of PM is contingent upon clear public communications that engender trust and secure the social licence to collect and share large population-wide data sets because specific consent for each data re-use is impractical. Variation in the terminology used by different programmes used to describe PM may hinder clear communication and (...)
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  7. Zhongguo Gong Min Shen Mei Xin Li Shi Zheng Yan Jiu =.Lingli Zhao & Hong Wang (eds.) - 2010 - Beijing da Xue Chu Ban She.
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  8.  2
    Wang Min’An. Domestic Spaces in Post-Mao China: On Electronic Household Appliances. Trans. Shaobo Xie. New York: Routledge, 2018. 101 Pp. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Schnapp - 2020 - Critical Inquiry 46 (2):465-467.
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  9. Neural Networks and Statistical Learning Methods (III)-The Application of Modified Hierarchy Genetic Algorithm Based on Adaptive Niches.Wei-Min Qi, Qiao-Ling Ji & Wei-You Cai - 2006 - In O. Stock & M. Schaerf (eds.), Lecture Notes in Computer Science. Springer Verlag. pp. 3930--842.
  10.  1
    The Impact of Caring for Dying Patients in Intensive Care Units on a Physician’s Personhood: A Systematic Scoping Review.Joshua Tze Yin Kuek, Lisa Xin Ling Ngiam, Nur Haidah Ahmad Kamal, Jeng Long Chia, Natalie Pei Xin Chan, Ahmad Bin Hanifah Marican Abdurrahman, Chong Yao Ho, Lorraine Hui En Tan, Jun Leng Goh, Michelle Shi Qing Khoo, Yun Ting Ong, Min Chiam, Annelissa Mien Chew Chin, Stephen Mason & Lalit Kumar Radha Krishna - 2020 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 15 (1):1-16.
    Background Supporting physicians in Intensive Care Units s as they face dying patients at unprecedented levels due to the COVID-19 pandemic is critical. Amidst a dearth of such data and guided by evidence that nurses in ICUs experience personal, professional and existential issues in similar conditions, a systematic scoping review is proposed to evaluate prevailing accounts of physicians facing dying patients in ICUs through the lens of Personhood. Such data would enhance understanding and guide the provision of better support for (...)
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  11.  42
    Why Do Groups Cooperate More Than Individuals to Reduce Risks?Min Gong, Jonathan Baron & Howard Kunreuther - 2013 - Theory and Decision 75 (1):101-116.
    Previous research has discovered a curious phenomenon: groups cooperate less than individuals in a deterministic prisoner’s dilemma game, but cooperate more than individuals when uncertainty is introduced into the game. We conducted two studies to examine three possible processes that might drive groups to be more cooperative than individuals in reducing risks: group risk concern, group cooperation expectation, and pressure to conform to social norms. We found that ex post guilt aversion and ex-post blame avoidance cause group (...)
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  12. Closed-Loop Transcutaneous Auricular Vagal Nerve Stimulation: Current Situation and Future Possibilities.Yutian Yu, Jing Ling, Lingling Yu, Pengfei Liu & Min Jiang - 2022 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 15.
    Closed-loop transcutaneous auricular vagal nerve stimulation was officially proposed in 2020. This work firstly reviewed two existing CL-taVNS forms: motor-activated auricular vagus nerve stimulation and respiratory-gated auricular vagal afferent nerve stimulation, and then proposed three future CL-taVNS systems: electroencephalography -gated CL-taVNS, electrocardiography -gated CL-taVNS, and subcutaneous humoral signals -gated CL-taVNS. We also highlighted the mechanisms, targets, technical issues, and patterns of CL-taVNS. By reviewing, proposing, and highlighting, this work might draw a preliminary blueprint for the development of CL-taVNS.
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  13.  30
    Misattributing the Source of Self-Generated Representations Related to Dissociative and Psychotic Symptoms.Chui-De Chiu, Mei-Chih Meg Tseng, Yi-Ling Chien, Shih-Cheng Liao, Chih-Min Liu, Yei-Yu Yeh & Hai-Gwo Hwu - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
  14.  13
    Visual Short-Term Memory Load Modulates the Early Attention and Perception of Task-Irrelevant Emotional Faces.Ping Yang, Min Wang, Zhenlan Jin & Ling Li - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  15.  24
    Organ Donation After Assisted Death: Is It More or Less Ethically-Problematic Than Donation After Circulatory Death?Jeffrey Kirby - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (4):629-635.
    A provocative question has emerged since the Supreme Court of Canada’s decision on assisted dying: Should Canadians who request, and are granted, an assisted death be considered a legitimate source of transplantable organs? A related question is addressed in this paper: is controlled organ donation after assisted death more or less ethically-problematic than standard, controlled organ donation after circulatory determination of death? Controversial, ethics-related dimensions of cDCD that are of relevance to this research question are explored, and morally-relevant distinctions (...)
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  16.  1
    Multi-Instance Multi-Label Learning.Zhi-Hua Zhou, Min-Ling Zhang, Sheng-Jun Huang & Yu-Feng Li - 2012 - Artificial Intelligence 176 (1):2291-2320.
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  17.  18
    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Study of Thef–Dinteraction in Pyrochlore Iridate Gd2Ir2O7.Hui Han, Lei Zhang, Hui Liu, Langsheng Ling, Wei Tong, Youming Zou, Min Ge, Jiyu Fan, Changjin Zhang, Li Pi & Yuheng Zhang - 2015 - Philosophical Magazine 95 (27):3014-3022.
  18.  85
    On the Common Saying That It is Better That Ten Guilty Persons Escape Than That One Innocent Suffer: Pro and Con.Jeffrey Reiman & Ernest Van Den Haag - 1990 - Social Philosophy and Policy 7 (2):226-248.
    In Zadig , published in 1748, Voltaire wrote of “the great principle that it is better to run the risk of sparing the guilty than to condemn the innocent.” At about the same time, Blackstone noted approvingly that “the law holds that it is better that ten guilty persons escape, than that one innocent suffer.” In 1824, Thomas Fielding cited the principle as an Italian proverb and a maxim of English law. John Stuart Mill endorsed it in an (...)
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  19.  27
    Television Viewing and Ethical Reasoning: Why Watching Scrubs Does a Better Job Than Most Bioethics Classes.Jeffrey Spike - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (12):11 – 13.
  20. Extending the Ring Theory of Personhood to the Care of Dying Patients in Intensive Care Units.Lalit Kumar Radha Krishna, Stephen Mason, Annelissa Mien Chew Chin, Alexia Sze Inn Lee, Min Chiam, Yun Ting Ong, Ahmad Bin Hanifah Marican Abdurrahman, Nur Haidah Binte Ahmad Kamal, Joshua Tze Yin Kuek, Lisa Xin Ling Ngiam, Chong Yao Ho, Jeng Long Chia & Natalie Pei Xin Chan - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 14 (1):71-86.
    It is evident, in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic that has physicians confronting death and dying at unprecedented levels along with growing data suggesting that physicians who care for dying patients face complex emotional, psychological and behavioural effects, that there is a need for their better understanding and the implementation of supportive measures. Taking into account data positing that effects of caring for dying patients may impact a physician’s concept of personhood, or “what makes you, ‘you’”, we adopt Radha (...)
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  21.  38
    On the Common Saying That It is Better That Ten Guilty Persons Escape Than That One Innocent Suffer: Pro and Con.Jeffrey Reiman & Ernest Den Haavang - 1990 - Social Philosophy and Policy 7 (2):226.
    In Zadig, published in 1748, Voltaire wrote of “the great principle that it is better to run the risk of sparing the guilty than to condemn the innocent.” At about the same time, Blackstone noted approvingly that “the law holds that it is better that ten guilty persons escape, than that one innocent suffer.” In 1824, Thomas Fielding cited the principle as an Italian proverb and a maxim of English law. John Stuart Mill endorsed it in an address (...)
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  22.  19
    The Curvilinear Relationship Between Ethical Leadership and Team Creativity: The Moderating Role of Team Faultlines.Shenjiang Mo, Chu-Ding Ling & Xiao-Yun Xie - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 154 (1):229-242.
    In this study, we built and tested a theoretical model to determine how ethical leadership affects team creativity among teams composed of different characteristics. Following social learning theory and an antecedent–benefit–cost framework, we conducted analyses of multisource data from 50 team supervisors and 186 employees, which revealed an inverted U-shaped relationship between ethical leadership and team creativity. The teams exhibited more creativity when there was a moderate level of ethical leadership than when there were very low or very high (...)
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  23.  27
    Introduction: “More Trouble Than They Are Worth”.Jeffrey M. Perl, Paul J. Griffiths, G. R. Evans & Clark Davis - 2009 - Common Knowledge 15 (1):1-6.
    This essay, which is the editor's introduction to part 1 of a multipart symposium on quietism, also constitutes his call for symposium papers. The symposium is meant be comprehensive. It is described as political and broadly cultural as well as religious, and in religious terms is said to cover not only the Catholic and Protestant quietisms (most properly so called) of the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, but also the proto-quietisms of the medieval Western church and reputedly quietist aspects of (...)
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  24.  9
    Understanding Perception of Algorithmic Decisions: Fairness, Trust, and Emotion in Response to Algorithmic Management.Min Kyung Lee - 2018 - Big Data and Society 5 (1).
    Algorithms increasingly make managerial decisions that people used to make. Perceptions of algorithms, regardless of the algorithms' actual performance, can significantly influence their adoption, yet we do not fully understand how people perceive decisions made by algorithms as compared with decisions made by humans. To explore perceptions of algorithmic management, we conducted an online experiment using four managerial decisions that required either mechanical or human skills. We manipulated the decision-maker, and measured perceived fairness, trust, and emotional response. With the mechanical (...)
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  25.  15
    Organizations Appear More Unethical Than Individuals.Arthur S. Jago & Jeffrey Pfeffer - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (1):71-87.
    Both individuals and organizations can engage in unethical behaviors. Across six experiments, we examine how people’s ethical judgments are affected by whether the agent engaging in unethical action is a person or an organization. People believe organizations are more unethical than individuals, even when both agents engage in identical behaviors. Using both mediation and moderation analytical approaches, we find that this effect is explained by people’s beliefs that organizations produce more harm when behaving unethically, even when they do not, (...)
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  26.  12
    Applying Lean Six Sigma Methodology to Reduce Cesarean Section Rate.Ze-Ying Chai, Hua-Min Hu, Xiu-Ling Ren, Bao-Jin Zeng, Ling-Zhi Zheng & Feng Qi - 2017 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 23 (3):562-566.
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  27.  34
    When and How Does Psychological Voice Climate Influence Individual Change Readiness? The Mediating Role of Normative Commitment and the Moderating Role of Work Engagement.Chun-Hsien Lee, Mei-Ling Wang & Min-Shi Liu - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  28.  6
    Does Empirical Legal Studies Shed More Heat Than Light? The Case of Civil Damage Awards.Jeffrey J. Rachlinski - 2016 - Ratio Juris 29 (4):556-571.
    Empirical investigation of legal systems is emerging as a leading trend in both the social sciences and the legal academy in the early twenty-first century. Law reviews are now filled with studies reporting empirical data. Because empirical investigation of law commonly seeks to inform contentious social and political debates, however, its research often fuels more debate than it resolves. Partisans on both sides of contentious issues now cite the same body of research to support their reform efforts. However, social (...)
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  29.  4
    Children Only 3 Years Old Can Succeed at Conditional “If, Then” Reasoning, Much Earlier Than Anyone Had Thought Possible.Daphne S. Ling, Cole D. Wong & Adele Diamond - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    That conditional, if-then reasoning does not emerge until 4–5 years has long been accepted. Here we show that children barely 3 years old can do conditional reasoning. All that was needed was a superficial change to the stimuli: When color was a property of the shapes rather than of the background, 3-year-olds could succeed. Three-year-olds do not seem to use color to inform them which shape is correct unless color is a property of the shapes themselves. While CD requires (...)
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  30.  37
    The Eyes of the People: Democracy in an Age of Spectatorship.Jeffrey Edward Green (ed.) - 2010 - Oup Usa.
    For centuries it has been assumed that democracy must refer to the empowerment of the People's voice. In this pioneering book, Jeffrey Edward Green makes the case for considering the People as an ocular entity rather than a vocal one. Green argues that it is both possible and desirable to understand democracy in terms of what the People gets to see instead of the traditional focus on what it gets to say. The Eyes of the People examines democracy (...)
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  31. General Dynamic Triviality Theorems.Jeffrey Sanford Russell & John Hawthorne - 2016 - Philosophical Review 125 (3):307-339.
    Famous results by David Lewis show that plausible-sounding constraints on the probabilities of conditionals or evaluative claims lead to unacceptable results, by standard probabilistic reasoning. Existing presentations of these results rely on stronger assumptions than they really need. When we strip these arguments down to a minimal core, we can see both how certain replies miss the mark, and also how to devise parallel arguments for other domains, including epistemic “might,” probability claims, claims about comparative value, and so on. (...)
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  32.  83
    Jeffrey Conditioning and External Bayesianity.Carl Wagner - 2010 - Logic Journal of the IGPL 18 (2):336-345.
    Suppose that several individuals who have separately assessed prior probability distributions over a set of possible states of the world wish to pool their individual distributions into a single group distribution, while taking into account jointly perceived new evidence. They have the option of first updating their individual priors and then pooling the resulting posteriors or first pooling their priors and then updating the resulting group prior. If the pooling method that they employ is such that they arrive at the (...)
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  33.  86
    Jeffrey's Rule of Conditioning.Glenn Shafer - 1981 - Philosophy of Science 48 (3):337-362.
    Richard Jeffrey's generalization of Bayes' rule of conditioning follows, within the theory of belief functions, from Dempster's rule of combination and the rule of minimal extension. Both Jeffrey's rule and the theory of belief functions can and should be construed constructively, rather than normatively or descriptively. The theory of belief functions gives a more thorough analysis of how beliefs might be constructed than Jeffrey's rule does. The inadequacy of Bayesian conditioning is much more general (...) Jeffrey's examples of uncertain perception might suggest. The ``parameter α '' that Hartry Field has introduced into Jeffrey's rule corresponds to the "weight of evidence" of the theory of belief functions. (shrink)
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  34. Valuing and Caring.Jeffrey Seidman - 2009 - Theoria 75 (4):272-303.
    What is it to "value" something, in the semi-technical sense of the term that Gary Watson establishes? I argue that valuing something consists in caring about it. Caring involves not only emotional dispositions of the sort that Agnieszka Jaworska has elaborated, but also a distinctive cognitive disposition – namely, a (defeasible) disposition to believe the object cared about to be a source of agent-relative reasons for action and for emotion. Understood in this way, an agent's carings have a stronger claim (...)
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  35. Quantum Physics in Neuroscience and Psychology: A Neurophysical Model of Mind–Brain Interaction.Jeffrey M. Schwartz, Henry P. Stapp & Mario Beauregard - 2005 - Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 360:1309-1327.
    Neuropsychological research on the neural basis of behaviour generally posits that brain mechanisms will ultimately suffice to explain all psychologically described phenomena. This assumption stems from the idea that the brain is made up entirely of material particles and fields, and that all causal mechanisms relevant to neuroscience can therefore be formulated solely in terms of properties of these elements. Thus, terms having intrinsic mentalistic and/or experiential content (e.g. ‘feeling’, ‘knowing’ and ‘effort’) are not included as primary causal factors. This (...)
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  36. Possible Worlds and the Objective World.Jeffrey Sanford Russell - 2015 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 90 (2):389-422.
    David Lewis holds that a single possible world can provide more than one way things could be. But what are possible worlds good for if they come apart from ways things could be? We can make sense of this if we go in for a metaphysical understanding of what the world is. The world does not include everything that is the case—only the genuine facts. Understood this way, Lewis's “cheap haecceitism” amounts to a kind of metaphysical anti-haecceitism: it says (...)
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  37. Linguistic Intuitions.Jeffrey Maynes & Steven Gross - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (8):714-730.
    Linguists often advert to what are sometimes called linguistic intuitions. These intuitions and the uses to which they are put give rise to a variety of philosophically interesting questions: What are linguistic intuitions – for example, what kind of attitude or mental state is involved? Why do they have evidential force and how might this force be underwritten by their causal etiology? What light might their causal etiology shed on questions of cognitive architecture – for example, as a case study (...)
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  38.  16
    Association of Alprazolam with Major Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Hypertension.Chao-Bin Yeh, Ming-Che Tsai, Ying-Hock Teng, Min-Sho Ku, Jing-Yang Huang, Bo-Yuan Wang, Chia-Ling Tai, Edy Kornelius & Sai-Wai Ho - 2020 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 26 (3):983-991.
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  39.  53
    An Examination of Differences in Ethical Decision-Making Between Canadian Business Students and Accounting Professionals.Jeffrey R. Cohen, Laurie W. Pant & David J. Sharp - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 30 (4):319 - 336.
    This study investigates the differences in individuals'' ethical decision making between Canadian university business students and accounting professionals. We examine the differences in three measures known to be important in the ethical decision-making process: ethical awareness, ethical orientation, and intention to perform questionable acts. We tested for differences in these three measures in eight different questionable actions among three groups: students starting business studies, those in their final year of university, and professional accountants.The measures of awareness capture the extent to (...)
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  40.  5
    Current Status of Research Ethics Capacity in Myanmar.Zaw-Zaw Oo, Yin-Thet-Nu Oo, Mo-Mo Than, Khine Zaw Oo, Min Wun, Kyaw-Soe Htun & Henry Silverman - 2018 - Asian Bioethics Review 10 (2):123-132.
    Myanmar has recently surfaced from total military rule and efforts at conducting research to enhance the health of the population has increased during the recent democratization process, both from the military and civil sectors as well as support from international agencies. International guidelines mandate that such research requires prior ethics review in accordance with international standards. Previous commentators have expressed concerns, however, regarding the degree of adequate training in research ethics for investigators, the optimal functioning of Research Ethics Committees, and (...)
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  41. Linda B. Smith, Susan S. Jones, Hanako Yoshida and Eliana Colunga (Indiana University) Whose Dam Account? Attentional Learning Explains Booth and Waxman, 209–213.Sarah Hulme, Peter Mitchell, David Wood, Michele Miozzo, Min Wang, Keiko Koda, Charles A. Perfetti, James R. Brockmole, Ranxiao Frances Wang & Jeffrey Lidz - 2003 - Cognition 87:237-239.
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  42.  9
    Representational Change and Magnitude Estimation: Why Young Children Can Make More Accurate Salary Comparisons Than Adults.John E. Opfer & Jeffrey M. DeVries - 2008 - Cognition 108 (3):843-849.
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  43. Self-Assembling Networks.Jeffrey A. Barrett, Brian Skyrms & Aydin Mohseni - 2019 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 70 (1):1-25.
    We consider how an epistemic network might self-assemble from the ritualization of the individual decisions of simple heterogeneous agents. In such evolved social networks, inquirers may be significantly more successful than they could be investigating nature on their own. The evolved network may also dramatically lower the epistemic risk faced by even the most talented inquirers. We consider networks that self-assemble in the context of both perfect and imperfect communication and compare the behaviour of inquirers in each. This provides (...)
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  44.  99
    Simulation, Self-Extinction, and Philosophy in the Service of Human Civilization.Jeffrey White - 2016 - AI and Society 31 (2):171-190.
    Nick Bostrom’s recently patched ‘‘simulation argument’’ (Bostrom in Philos Q 53:243–255, 2003; Bos- trom and Kulczycki in Analysis 71:54–61, 2011) purports to demonstrate the probability that we ‘‘live’’ now in an ‘‘ancestor simulation’’—that is as a simulation of a period prior to that in which a civilization more advanced than our own—‘‘post-human’’—becomes able to simulate such a state of affairs as ours. As such simulations under consid- eration resemble ‘‘brains in vats’’ (BIVs) and may appear open to similar objections, (...)
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  45.  42
    Divine Action, Determinism, and the Laws of Nature.Jeffrey Koperski - 2020 - London, UK: Routledge.
    A longstanding question at the intersection of science, philosophy, and theology is how God might act, or not, when governing the universe. Many believe that determinism would prevent God from acting at all, since to do so would require violating the laws of nature. However, when a robust view of these laws is coupled with the kind of determinism now used in dynamics, a new model of divine action emerges. This book presents a new approach to divine action beyond the (...)
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  46.  6
    Analyzing Knowledge Retrieval Impairments Associated with Alzheimer’s Disease Using Network Analyses.Jeffrey C. Zemla & Joseph L. Austerweil - 2019 - Complexity 2019:1-12.
    A defining characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease is difficulty in retrieving semantic memories, or memories encoding facts and knowledge. While it has been suggested that this impairment is caused by a degradation of the semantic store, the precise ways in which the semantic store is degraded are not well understood. Using a longitudinal corpus of semantic fluency data, we derive semantic network representations of patients with Alzheimer’s disease and of healthy controls. We contrast our network-based approach with analyzing fluency data with (...)
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  47.  32
    Pharmacogenetics and Uncertainty: Implications for Policy Makers.Tom Ling & Ann Raven - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 37 (3):533-549.
    Uncertainty for policy makers is not new but the pressure to make decisions under conditions of uncertainty is perhaps greater than ever. The arrival of new scientific developments such as pharmacogenetics offers potentially great benefits . They have passionate supporters as well as doubters. The evidence is often extensive but unclear and policy makers may find themselves under pressure to make decisions before they feel that the evidence is compelling.The UK is particularly well placed to play a leading role (...)
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  48.  40
    Time Warp: Authorship Shapes the Perceived Timing of Actions and Events.Jeffrey P. Ebert & Daniel M. Wegner - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):481-489.
    It has been proposed that inferring personal authorship for an event gives rise to intentional binding, a perceptual illusion in which one’s action and inferred effect seem closer in time than they otherwise would . Using a novel, naturalistic paradigm, we conducted two experiments to test this hypothesis and examine the relationship between binding and self-reported authorship. In both experiments, an important authorship indicator – consistency between one’s action and a subsequent event – was manipulated, and its effects on (...)
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  49.  27
    Politics Must Get It Right Sometimes: Reply to Muirhead.John B. Min - 2016 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 28 (3-4):404-411.
    ABSTRACTIn “The Politics of Getting It Right,” Russell Muirhead has contended in this journal that democracy is valuable because of its procedural legitimacy rather than because of the epistemic values of “getting things right.” However, pure procedural theories of legitimacy fail. Thus, if democracy is legitimate, it will have to be due partly to its epistemic advantages. There are two ways of thinking about these advantages. One approach, associated most prominently with David Estlund and Hélène Landemore, equates the epistemic (...)
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  50.  49
    Self-Assembling Games.Jeffrey A. Barrett & Brian Skyrms - 2017 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 68 (2):329-353.
    We consider how cue-reading, sensory-manipulation, and signaling games may initially evolve from ritualized decisions and how more complex games may evolve from simpler games by polymerization, template transfer, and modular composition. Modular composition is a process that combines simpler games into more complex games. Template transfer, a process by which a game is appropriated to a context other than the one in which it initially evolved, is one mechanism for modular composition. And polymerization is a particularly salient example of (...)
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