Results for 'Jeffrey M. Kidd'

1000+ found
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  1.  11
    A recurrent 16p12.1 microdeletion supports a two-hit model for severe developmental delay.Santhosh Girirajan, Jill A. Rosenfeld, Gregory M. Cooper, Francesca Antonacci, Priscillia Siswara, Andy Itsara, Laura Vives, Tom Walsh, Shane E. McCarthy, Carl Baker, Heather C. Mefford, Jeffrey M. Kidd, Sharon R. Browning, Brian L. Browning, Diane E. Dickel, Deborah L. Levy, Blake C. Ballif, Kathryn Platky, Darren M. Farber, Gordon C. Gowans, Jessica J. Wetherbee, Alexander Asamoah, David D. Weaver, Paul R. Mark, Jennifer Dickerson, Bhuwan P. Garg, Sara A. Ellingwood, Rosemarie Smith, Valerie C. Banks, Wendy Smith, Marie T. McDonald, Joe J. Hoo, Beatrice N. French, Cindy Hudson, John P. Johnson, Jillian R. Ozmore, John B. Moeschler, Urvashi Surti, Luis F. Escobar, Dima El-Khechen, Jerome L. Gorski, Jennifer Kussmann, Bonnie Salbert, Yves Lacassie, Alisha Biser, Donna M. McDonald-McGinn, Elaine H. Zackai, Matthew A. Deardorff, Tamim H. Shaikh, Eric Haan, Kathryn L. Friend, Marco Fichera, Corrado Romano, Jozef Gécz, Lynn E. DeLisi, Jonathan Sebat, Mary-Claire King, Lisa G. Shaffer & Eic - unknown
    We report the identification of a recurrent, 520-kb 16p12.1 microdeletion associated with childhood developmental delay. The microdeletion was detected in 20 of 11,873 cases compared with 2 of 8,540 controls and replicated in a second series of 22 of 9,254 cases compared with 6 of 6,299 controls. Most deletions were inherited, with carrier parents likely to manifest neuropsychiatric phenotypes compared to non-carrier parents. Probands were more likely to carry an additional large copy-number variant when compared to matched controls. The clinical (...)
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  2.  5
    Language and the rise of the algorithm.Jeffrey M. Binder - 2022 - London: University of Chicago Press.
    A wide-ranging history of the intellectual developments that produced the modern idea of the algorithm. Bringing together the histories of mathematics, computer science, and linguistic thought, Language and the Rise of the Algorithm reveals how recent developments in artificial intelligence are reopening an issue that troubled mathematicians long before the computer age. How do you draw the line between computational rules and the complexities of making systems comprehensible to people? Here Jeffrey M. Binder offers a compelling tour of four (...)
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  3. Religion and philosophy.Jeffrey M. Suderman - 2015 - In Aaron Garrett & James Anthony Harris (eds.), Scottish Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century. Oxford University Press.
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  4.  42
    Perceiving, remembering, and communicating structure in events.Jeffrey M. Zacks, Barbara Tversky & Gowri Iyer - 2001 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 130 (1):29.
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  5.  26
    Using movement and intentions to understand simple events.Jeffrey M. Zacks - 2004 - Cognitive Science 28 (6):979-1008.
    In order to understand ongoing activity, observers segment it into meaningful temporal parts. Segmentation can be based on bottom‐up processing of distinctive sensory characteristics, such as movement features. Segmentation may also be affected by top‐down effects of knowledge structures, including information about actors' intentions. Three experiments investigated the role of movement features and intentions in perceptual event segmentation, using simple animations. In all conditions, movement features significantly predicted where participants segmented. This relationship was stronger when participants identified larger units than (...)
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  6.  58
    Using movement and intentions to understand human activity.Jeffrey M. Zacks, Shawn Kumar, Richard A. Abrams & Ritesh Mehta - 2009 - Cognition 112 (2):201-216.
  7.  7
    Peace and mind: civilian scholarship from common knowledge.Jeffrey M. Perl (ed.) - 2011 - Aurora, Colo.: Davies Group, Publishers.
    Compilation of articles originally published in Common knowledge.
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  8. Quantum physics in neuroscience and psychology: a neurophysical model of mind–brain interaction.Jeffrey M. Schwartz, Henry P. Stapp & Mario Beauregard - 2005 - Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 360:1309-1327.
    Neuropsychological research on the neural basis of behaviour generally posits that brain mechanisms will ultimately suffice to explain all psychologically described phenomena. This assumption stems from the idea that the brain is made up entirely of material particles and fields, and that all causal mechanisms relevant to neuroscience can therefore be formulated solely in terms of properties of these elements. Thus, terms having intrinsic mentalistic and/or experiential content (e.g. ‘feeling’, ‘knowing’ and ‘effort’) are not included as primary causal factors. This (...)
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  9.  29
    A Simple Framework for Evaluating Authorial Contributions for Scientific Publications.Jeffrey M. Warrender - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (5):1419-1430.
    A simple tool is provided to assist researchers in assessing contributions to a scientific publication, for ease in evaluating which contributors qualify for authorship, and in what order the authors should be listed. The tool identifies four phases of activity leading to a publication—Conception and Design, Data Acquisition, Analysis and Interpretation, and Manuscript Preparation. By comparing a project participant’s contribution in a given phase to several specified thresholds, a score of up to five points can be assigned; the contributor’s scores (...)
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  10.  30
    Commentaries by Jeffrey M. Prottas, Olga Jonasson, and John I. Kleinig.Jeffrey M. Prottas - 2002 - In Ruth F. Chadwick & Doris Schroeder (eds.), Applied Ethics: Critical Concepts in Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 3--140.
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  11. A role for volition and attention in the generation of new brain circuitry. Toward a neurobiology of mental force.Jeffrey M. Schwartz - 1999 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (8-9):115-142.
    Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a commonly occurring neuropsychiatric condition characterized by bothersome intrusive thoughts and urges that frequently lead to repetitive dysfunctional behaviours such as excessive handwashing. There are well-documented alterations in cerebral function which appear to be closely related to the manifestation of these symptoms. Controlled studies of cognitive-behavioural therapy techniques utilizing the active refocusing of attention away from the intrusive phenomena of OCD and onto adaptive alternative activities have demonstrated both significant improvements in clinical symptoms and systematic changes in (...)
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  12.  34
    Principles, exemplars, and uses of history in early 20th century genetics.Jeffrey M. Skopek - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 42 (2):210-225.
    This paper is concerned with the uses of history in science. It focuses in particular on Anglo-American genetics and on university textbooks—where the canon of a science is consolidated, as the heterogeneous approaches and controversies of its practice are rendered unified for its reproduction. Tracing the emergence and eventual standardization of geneticists’ use of a case-based method of teaching in the 1920s–1950s, this paper argues that geneticists created historical environments in their textbooks—spaces in which students developed an understanding of the (...)
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  13.  23
    Structuring information interfaces for procedural learning.Jeffrey M. Zacks & Barbara Tversky - 2003 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 9 (2):88.
  14.  61
    Scaling up from atomic to complex events.Jeffrey M. Zacks - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):909-910.
    The Theory of Event Coding deals with brief events but has implications for longer, complex events, particularly goal-directed activities. Two of the theory's central claims are consistent with or assumed by theories of complex events. However, the claim that event codes arise from the rapid activation and integration of features presents challenges for scaling up to larger events.
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  15.  10
    Principles, exemplars, and uses of history in early 20th century genetics.Jeffrey M. Skopek - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 42 (2):210-225.
  16. Dissolving the wine/water paradox.Jeffrey M. Mikkelson - 2004 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 55 (1):137-145.
    water paradox has long served as an argument against the Principle of Indifference. A solution to the paradox is proposed, with a view toward resolving general difficulties in applying the principle.
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  17.  10
    Regarding Change at Ise Jingū.Jeffrey M. Perl - 2019 - Common Knowledge 25 (1-3):220-232.
    This essay introduces the second of three installments of an “elegiac symposium” in Common Knowledge on figures and concepts devalued in what Thomas Kuhn refers to as “paradigm shifts.” The essay suggests that Kuhn’s idea is provincial, in three specified senses, and then goes on to show how differently Japanese culture regards and manages major change. The author of this introduction, who is also the journal’s editor, begins by evaluating a triptych of 1895 by Toshikata as a response to the (...)
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  18.  13
    How Does Social Behavior Relate to Both Grades and Achievement Scores?Jeffrey M. DeVries, Katharina Rathmann & Markus Gebhardt - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  19.  10
    Introduction.Jeffrey M. Perl - 2020 - Common Knowledge 26 (3):441-452.
    In this introduction to Part 1 of “Contextualism—the Next Generation: Symposium on the Future of a Methodology,” the editor of Common Knowledge, a “journal of left-wing Kuhnian opinion,” reports that the new symposium responds to contextualist criticism of the previous CK symposium, which was on xenophilia. The content of the earlier symposium met with objections, from contextualists, on the grounds of methodology, and the new symposium questions the methodology of contextualism for the limits that it places on content as well (...)
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  20.  17
    Xenophilia, Difference, and Indifference.Jeffrey M. Perl - 2018 - Common Knowledge 24 (2):234-238.
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  21. What Makes Disability Discrimination Wrong?Jeffrey M. Brown - 2021 - Law and Philosophy 40 (1):1-31.
    This paper concerns the question of what makes disability discrimination morally objectionable. When I refer to disability discrimination, I am focusing solely on a failure or denial of reasonable accommodations to a disabled person. I argue a failure to provide reasonable accommodations is wrong when and because it violates principles of relational equality. To do so, I examine four accounts of wrongful discrimination found in the literature and apply these theories to disability discrimination. I argue that all of these accounts (...)
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  22. Relational Equality and Disability Injustice.Jeffrey M. Brown - 2019 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 16 (3):327-357.
    People with disabilities suffer from pervasive inequalities in employment, education, transportation, housing, and health care compared to those who are not disabled. Moreover, people with disabilities are often subject to unjustified stigma and pity. In this paper, I will explain why these disadvantages violate relational egalitarian principles of justice. As I will show, my argument can account for both kinds of inequality that disabled people face.
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  23.  13
    Case Studies: In Organ Transplants, Americans First?Jeffrey M. Prottas, Olga Jonasson & John I. Kleinig - 1986 - Hastings Center Report 16 (5):23.
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  24.  35
    Use of Forensic DNA Evidence in Prosecutors' Offices.Jeffrey M. Prottas & Alice A. Noble - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (2):310-315.
    This article reports on a survey of DNA-related practices and procedures within District Attorneys' offices to obtain preliminary information about actual prosecutorial practices. The data obtained is preliminary but supportive of further study of areas targeted by the survey.
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  25.  31
    Use of Forensic DNA Evidence in Prosecutors' Offices.Jeffrey M. Prottas & Alice A. Noble - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (2):310-315.
    DNA evidence has rapidly become a significant and routine feature of modern criminal prosecutions. The first introduction of DNA evidence in a U.S. Court occurred in 1987. By 1994, 42 percent of local prosecutors reported that they had used DNA evidence in a felony case at least once. By 2001 that number had increased to 68 percent. Moreover, from a technical point of view, the potential benefits of DNA testing are substantial. Early hurdles to admissibility during trial have been overcome (...)
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  26.  64
    Collateral Legal Consequences of Criminal Convictions in a Society of Equals.Jeffrey M. Brown - 2021 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 15 (2):181-205.
    This paper concerns what if any obligations a “society of equals” has to criminal offenders after legal punishment ends. In the United States, when people leave prisons, they are confronted with a wide range of federal, state, and local laws that burden their ability to secure welfare benefits, public housing, employment opportunities, and student loans. Since the 1980s, these legal consequences of criminal convictions have steadily increased in their number, severity, and scope. The central question I want to ask is (...)
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  27.  31
    Mind Perception and Willingness to Withdraw Life Support.Jeffrey M. Rudski, Benjamin Herbsman, Eric D. Quitter & Nicole Bilgram - 2016 - Neuroethics 9 (3):235-242.
    Discussions of withdrawal of life support often revolve around a patient’s perceived level of suffering or lack of experience. Personhood, however, is often linked to personal agency. In the present study, 279 laypeople estimated the amount of agency and experience in hypothetical patients differing in degree of consciousness. Participants also indicated whether they would choose to maintain or terminate life support. Patients were more likely to terminate life support for a patient in a persistent vegetative state, followed by one with (...)
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  28.  94
    Music and Emotion—A Case for North Indian Classical Music.Jeffrey M. Valla, Jacob A. Alappatt, Avantika Mathur & Nandini C. Singh - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  29.  9
    Genes and genomes: Chromosome bands – flavours to savour.Jeffrey M. Craig & Wendy A. Bickmore - 1993 - Bioessays 15 (5):349-354.
    The mammalian chromosome is longitudinally heterogeneous in structure and function and this is the basis for the specific banding patterns produced by various chromosome staining techniques. The two most frequently used techniques are G, or Giemsa banding and R, or reverse banding. Each type of stained band is characterised by variations in gene density, time of replication, base composition, density of repeat sequences, and chromatin packaging. It is increasingly apparent that R and G bands, which are complementary to each other, (...)
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  30.  29
    Attitudes of Canadian Pig Producers Toward Animal Welfare.Jeffrey M. Spooner, Catherine A. Schuppli & David Fraser - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (4):569-589.
    As part of a larger study eliciting Canadian producer and non-producer views about animal welfare, open-ended, semi-structured interviews were used to explore opinions about animal welfare of 20 Canadian pig producers, most of whom were involved in confinement-based systems. With the exception of the one organic producer, who emphasized the importance of a “natural” life, participants attached overriding importance to biological health and functioning. They saw their efforts as providing pigs with dry, thermally regulated, indoor environments where animals received abundant (...)
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  31.  11
    Romantic Disciplinarity and the Rise of the Algorithm.Jeffrey M. Binder - 2020 - Critical Inquiry 46 (4):813-834.
    Scholars in both digital humanities and media studies have noted an apparent disconnect between computation and the interpretive methods of the humanities. Alan Liu has argued that literary scholars employing digital methods encounter a “meaning problem” due to the difficulty of reconciling algorithmic methods with interpretive ones. Conversely, the media scholar Friedrich Kittler has questioned the adequacy of hermeneutics as a means of studying computers. This paper argues that that this disconnect results from a set of contingent decisions made in (...)
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  32.  21
    Hong Kong: Wake-Up Call.Jeffrey M. Perl - 2020 - Common Knowledge 26 (2):197-211.
    In this piece, the editor of Common Knowledge offers excerpts from his two-year correspondence with a reader in Hong Kong, who was drawn to arguments made in the journal about maintaining “quietism and resistance in the face of vile behavior.” In the summer and fall of 2019, during the insurrection in Hong Kong, his correspondent shifts rapidly from taking comfort in CK’s defense of quietism to a full embrace of “uncivil disobedience.” She implies that the solidarity the editor expresses with (...)
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  33.  9
    Genes and genomes: Chromosome bands – flavours to savour.Jeffrey M. Craig & Wendy A. Bickmore - 1993 - Bioessays 15 (5):349-354.
    The mammalian chromosome is longitudinally heterogeneous in structure and function and this is the basis for the specific banding patterns produced by various chromosome staining techniques. The two most frequently used techniques are G, or Giemsa banding and R, or reverse banding. Each type of stained band is characterised by variations in gene density, time of replication, base composition, density of repeat sequences, and chromatin packaging. It is increasingly apparent that R and G bands, which are complementary to each other, (...)
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  34.  40
    The volitional influence of the mind on the brain, with special reference to emotional self-regulation.Jeffrey M. Schwartz, Henry P. Stapp & Mario Beauregard - 2004 - In Mario Beauregard (ed.), Consciousness, Emotional Self-Regulation and the Brain. John Benjamins. pp. 195-238.
  35. Is Disability a Neutral Condition?Jeffrey M. Brown - 2016 - Journal of Social Philosophy 47 (2):188-210.
    The issue of whether biological and psychological properties associated with disability can be harmful, beneficial, or neutral brings up an important philosophical question about how we evaluate disability, and disability’s impact on well-being. The debate is usually characterized as between those who argue disability is intrinsically harmful, and disability rights advocates who argue that disability is just another way of being different, in part, because disability can also provide important benefits. I argue that this debate is a false one, as (...)
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  36.  13
    Imperial Fault Lines: Christianity and Colonial Power in India, 1818-1940.Jeffrey M. Diamond & Jeffrey Cox - 2004 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 124 (2):383.
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  37.  31
    Who owns the data in a clinical trial?Jeffrey M. Drazen - 2002 - Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):407-411.
    Data gathered by investigators are used to test the validity of a specific scientific hypothesis. When the hypothesis relates to the biology of a disease or its treatment, then data sets may contain specific and identifiable medical information. Since the information in a clinical data set was gathered to test a specific hypothesis and there is usually a sponsor interested in the outcome, the issue of who owns the data is a critical one. In my opinion, data from both publicly (...)
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  38.  30
    Heterochromatin?many flavours, common themes.Jeffrey M. Craig - 2005 - Bioessays 27 (1):17-28.
    Heterochromatin remains condensed throughout the cell cycle, is generally transcriptionally inert and is built and maintainedbygroupsoffactors witheachgroupmember sharing a similar function. In mammals, these groups include sequence-specific transcriptional repressors, functionalRNAandproteinsinvolvedinDNAandhistone methylation. Heterochromatin is cemented together via interactions within and between each protein group and ismaintainedbythecell’sreplicationmachinery.Itcanbe constitutive (permanent) or facultative (developmentally regulated) and be any size, from a gene promotor to a whole genome. By studying the formation of facultative heterochromatin, we have gained information about how heterochromatin is assembled. We have (...)
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  39.  21
    Ethics and War: An Introduction.Jeffrey M. Shaw - 2012 - Journal of Military Ethics 11 (4):365-367.
  40.  21
    Machines and Robots.Jeffrey M. Shaw - 2014 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 18 (3):248-250.
  41.  30
    Thomas Merton and Jacques Ellul on technology and freedom.Jeffrey M. Shaw - unknown
    This qualitative analysis examines the thinking of Thomas Merton and Jacques Ellul on the impact that they believe technology and the idea of progress has had on human freedom. The thesis is that for both Merton and Ellul, modern technology itself and an uncritical acceptance of the idea of technological progress potentially inhibits the contemplative life and serves to deprive humanity of the God-given gift of freedom. Examining Merton and Ellul through theological, sociological, and political lenses allows a point-by-point comparison (...)
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  42.  18
    First steps toward a theory of mental force: PET imaging of systematic cerebral changes after psychological treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder.Jeffrey M. Schwartz - 1999 - In S. Hameroff, A. Kaszniak & David Chalmers (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness Iii: The Third Tucson Discussions and Debates. MIT Press. pp. 3--111.
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  43.  7
    Don Marquis replies.Jeffrey M. Sconyers - 2011 - Hastings Center Report 41 (2):11-11.
  44.  7
    Don Marquis replies.Jeffrey M. Sconyers - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 41 (2):11-11.
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  45. Kudos, and a Correction: Navigating Growth Attenuation in Children with Profound Disabilities: Children's Interests, Family Decision-Making, and Community Concerns.Jeffrey M. Sconyers - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
  46.  23
    Solitary Confinement: Social Death and Its Afterlives.Jeffrey M. Perl - 2013 - Common Knowledge 21 (2):331-332.
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  47. Is Trust Like an 'Atmosphere'? Understanding the Phenomenon of Existential Trust.Jeffrey M. Courtright - 2013 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 20 (1):39-51.
    This article defends what I call the atmospheric claim about trust: at least one form of trust manifests itself in human life in a manner that is like an atmosphere (generalized, ambient, and diffuse). I also provide a provisional defense of the claim that trust is a necessary condition for the thriving of something that matters to us. I offer a phenomenological sketch of existential trust. Existential trust is a primordial and atmospheric (generalized, ambient, and diffuse) manifestation of trust that (...)
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  48.  13
    Introduction.Jeffrey M. Perl - 2018 - Common Knowledge 24 (1):26-34.
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  49.  32
    How is a toad not like a bug?Jeffrey M. Camhi - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (3):371-372.
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  50.  60
    Justice and Luck.Jeffrey M. Cervantez - 2011 - Southwest Philosophy Review 27 (1):37-45.
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