7 found
Order:
  1. Reflections on Understanding Violence.Jeffrey Benjamin White - 2012 - Biosemiotics 5 (3):439-444.
    Lorenzo Magnani’s Understanding Violence: The Intertwining of Morality, Religion and Violence is a big 23 book. Not big in the sense of page count or prepublication advertisement, but big in the sense of pregnant 24 with potential application. Professor Magnani is explicit in his intentions, “to show how violence is de facto 25 intertwined with morality, and how much violence is hidden, and invisibly or unintentionally performed" 26 (page 273) while confessing a personal motivation, “warning myself (and every reader) that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  39
    Heidegger and the Space Of Life.Jeffrey Benjamin White - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 19:181-188.
    Heidegger is perhaps best known for stressing the function of time as temporality on the phenomena of life. There is a sense, however, in which the full significance of these insights can be best understood only through an exploration of the function of space as spatiality in the phenomena of life. At their juxtaposition, there is a privileged perspective on the meaning of life, and most importantly on what is the most meaningful life on the Heideggerian account, thephilosophical life. The (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  36
    How Did Socrates Become Socrates?: On the Socratic Recipe for the Philosophic Life.Jeffrey Benjamin White - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 2:205-212.
    Socrates is philosophy’s greatest hero, and a model for the philosophic life. Yet, why did Socrates live the way he did? How did Socrates become Socrates? How can a contemporary philosopher aspire to be like Socrates, even in ways and contexts in which there is no record of a Socratic example? This short paper explores the implications of Socrates’ encounter with Callicles in the Gorgias on the aspiring philosophic life. In this dialogue, we find Socrates’ own testimony as to why (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  41
    Good Will and the Conscience in Kant’s Ethical Theory.Jeffrey Benjamin White - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 10:445-452.
    The compass point of Kantian ethics is Kant’s categorical imperative. The compass point of Kantian ethics directs persons to ends of actions. It directs to ends the attainment of which can be universally prescribed. It directs away from those which can not. Most reviews of the demands of the categorical imperative tend torest in an assay of rationality and its demands. I think that this is a mistake. I think that on Kant’s mature view, the conscience, and so the categorical (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  39
    Why Believe in Collective Agents? Because You Did Something Wrong!Jeffrey Benjamin White - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:845-851.
    The focus of the following paper is the phenomenon of the collective agent; what constitutes the appearance of a collective agent? I begin by investigating one simple argument for the existence of collective agents. Two critical issues emerge: does it make sense to hold a collective agent blameworthy, and, what is the motivation for doing so, one way or the other? I then dissolve these issues with a distinction, that between blameworthiness and responsibility. In light of this distinction, there appears (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  34
    Conscience, Consciousness, Sciousness and Science: A Glimpse at Neuroethics and the Future of Moral Philosophy.Jeffrey Benjamin White - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 42:207-213.
    No question has demanded so much attention from the philosopher of mind as has this one: What is consciousness? One promising answer begins by noting that consciousness is, itself, a conjugate of more basic stuff. For the ethicist, there is a question that seems at least formally related to the question of consciousness: What is conscience? Could it be that a similar approach carries similar promise? The following short paper first examines consciousness as a conjugate, and then pursues the implications (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  27
    Conscience: The A.C.T.With Model Of Moral Cognition.Jeffrey Benjamin White - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 10:437-444.
    This work introduces the ACTWith model of moral cognition. This is a model of conscience and conscientious agency, inspired by Socratic philosophy, neurology and artificial intelligence. The ACTWith model is a synthesis across these disciplines, integrating ancient and contemporary insights into the human condition, while distilling this synthesis into a practicable dynamic simplified via architectural paradigms imported from theories of computational models of human learning. It was developed in response to the need in these fields for a clear articulation of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark