8 found
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  1.  41
    Business Ethics Journal Rankings as Perceived by Business Ethics Scholars.Chad Albrecht, Jeffery A. Thompson, Jeffrey L. Hoopes & Pablo Rodrigo - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (2):227-237.
    We present the findings of a worldwide survey that was administered to business ethic scholars to better understand journal quality within the business ethics academic community. Based upon the data from the survey, we provide a ranking of the top 10 business ethics journals. We then provide a comparison of business ethics journals to other mainstream management journals in terms of journal quality. The results of the study suggest that, within the business ethics academic community, many scholars prefer to publish (...)
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  2.  58
    Psychological Contracts: A Nano-Level Perspective on Social Contract Theory.Jeffery A. Thompson & David W. Hart - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 68 (3):229-241.
    Social contract theory has been criticized as a “theory in search of application.” We argue that incorporating the nano, or individual, level of analysis into social contract inquiry will yield more descriptive theory. We draw upon the psychological contract perspective to address two critiques of social contract theory: its rigid macro-orientation and inattention to the process of contract formation. We demonstrate how a psychological contract approach offers practical insight into the impact of social contracting on day-to-day human interaction. We then (...)
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  3. Untangling Employee Loyalty: A Psychological Contract Perspective.David W. Hart & Jeffery A. Thompson - 2007 - Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (2):297-323.
    ABSTRACT:Although business ethicists have theorized frequently about the virtues and vices of employee loyalty, the concept of loyalty remains loosely defined. In this article, we argue that viewing loyalty as a cognitive phenomenon—an attitude that resides in the mind of the individual—helps to clarify definitional inconsistencies, provides a finer-grained analysis of the concept, and sheds additional light on the ethical implications of loyalty in organizations. Specifically, we adopt the psychological contract perspective to analyze loyalty's cognitive dimensions, and treat loyalty as (...)
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  4.  74
    Untangling Employee Loyalty: A Psychological Contract Perspective.David W. Hart & Jeffery A. Thompson - 2007 - Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (2):297-323.
    ABSTRACT:Although business ethicists have theorized frequently about the virtues and vices of employee loyalty, the concept of loyalty remains loosely defined. In this article, we argue that viewing loyalty as a cognitive phenomenon—an attitude that resides in the mind of the individual—helps to clarify definitional inconsistencies, provides a finer-grained analysis of the concept, and sheds additional light on the ethical implications of loyalty in organizations. Specifically, we adopt the psychological contract perspective to analyze loyalty's cognitive dimensions, and treat loyalty as (...)
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  5.  8
    Research companion to ethical behavior in organizations: constructs and measures.Bradley R. Agle, David W. Hart, Jeffery A. Thompson & Hilary M. Hendricks (eds.) - 2014 - Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar.
    Compiling empirical work from management and social science disciplines, the Research Companion to Ethical Behavior in Organizations provides an entry point for academic researchers and compliance officers interested in measuring the moral dimensions of individuals. Accessible to newcomers but geared toward academics, this detailed book catalogs the varied and nuanced constructs used in behavioral ethics, along with measures that assess those constructs. With its cross-disciplinary focus and expert commentary, a varied collection of learned scholars bring essential studies into one volume, (...)
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  6.  27
    Psychological Contracts.Jeffery A. Thompson & David W. Hart - 2005 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 16:38-43.
    Social contract theory has been criticized as a “theory in search of application.” We argue that incorporating the nano- or individual level of analysis into social contract inquiry will yield more descriptive theory. We draw upon the psychological contract perspective to address two critiques of social contract theory: its rigid macro orientation and inattention to the process of contract formation. We demonstrate how a psychological contract approach offers practical insight into the impact of social contracting on day-today human interaction.
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  7.  22
    The Effects of Ideological Work Beliefs on Organizational Influence: Shaping Social Networks Through the Psychological Contract.John B. Bingham, Jeffery A. Thompson, James Oldroyd, Jeffrey S. Bednar & J. Stuart Bunderson - 2008 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 19:80-91.
    We explore psychological contracts as mechanisms by which individuals gain influence in organizations. Using two distinct research settings and longitudinal analysis, we demonstrate that ideological contracts endow individuals with increased centrality in the organization’s influence network. More generally, we propose that an important outcome of different psychological contract types may be how they affect the nature of influence in organizations.
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  8.  33
    Untangling the Loyalty Debate.David W. Hart & Jeffery A. Thompson - 2006 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:9-14.
    Loyalty, whether moral duty or dangerous attachment, is a cognitive phenomenon — an attitude that resides in the mind of the individual. In this article, weconsider loyalty from a psychological contract perspective – that is, as an individual-level construction of perceived reciprocal obligations. Viewing loyalty in this way helps clarify definitional inconsistencies, provides a finer-grained analysis of the concept, and sheds additional light on the ethical implications of loyalty in organizations. We present a threetiered framework for conceptualizing loyalty which also (...)
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