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Jeffrey W. Howard [14]Jeffrey Howard [1]Jeff Howard [1]Jeffrey N. Howard [1]
  1. Dangerous Speech.Jeffrey W. Howard - 2019 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 47 (2):208-254.
    Philosophy &Public Affairs, Volume 47, Issue 2, Page 208-254, Spring 2019.
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  2.  17
    Undone Science: Charting Social Movement and Civil Society Challenges to Research Agenda Setting.David J. Hess, Gwen Ottinger, Joanna Kempner, Jeff Howard, Sahra Gibbon & Scott Frickel - 2010 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 35 (4):444-473.
    ‘‘Undone science’’ refers to areas of research that are left unfunded, incomplete, or generally ignored but that social movements or civil society organizations often identify as worthy of more research. This study mobilizes four recent studies to further elaborate the concept of undone science as it relates to the political construction of research agendas. Using these cases, we develop the argument that undone science is part of a broader politics of knowledge, wherein multiple and competing groups struggle over the construction (...)
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  3.  63
    Moral Subversion and Structural Entrapment.Jeffrey W. Howard - 2016 - Journal of Political Philosophy 24 (1):24-46.
  4.  54
    Punishment as Moral Fortification.Jeffrey W. Howard - 2017 - Law and Philosophy 36 (1):45-75.
    The proposal that the criminal justice system should focus on rehabilitation – rather than retribution, deterrence, or expressive denunciation – is among the least popular ideas in legal philosophy. Foremost among rehabilitation’s alleged weaknesses is that it views criminals as blameless patients to be treated, rather than culpable moral agents to be held accountable. This article offers a new interpretation of the rehabilitative approach that is immune to this objection and that furnishes the moral foundation that this approach has lacked. (...)
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  5.  56
    Criminal Wrongdoing, Restorative Justice, and the Moral Standing of Unjust States.Jeffrey W. Howard & Avia Pasternak - 2021 - Journal of Political Philosophy 31 (1):42-59.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  6.  28
    Criminal Wrongdoing, Restorative Justice, and the Moral Standing of Unjust States.Jeffrey W. Howard & Avia Pasternak - 2021 - Journal of Political Philosophy 31 (1):42-59.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  7.  24
    Criminal Wrongdoing, Restorative Justice, and the Moral Standing of Unjust States.Jeffrey W. Howard & Avia Pasternak - 2021 - Journal of Political Philosophy 31 (1):42-59.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  8.  27
    Criminal Wrongdoing, Restorative Justice, and the Moral Standing of Unjust States.Jeffrey W. Howard & Avia Pasternak - 2021 - Journal of Political Philosophy 31 (1):42-59.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  9.  96
    Punishment, Socially Deprived Offenders, and Democratic Community.Jeffrey Howard - 2013 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (1):121-136.
    The idea that victims of social injustice who commit crimes ought not to be subject to punishment has attracted serious attention in recent legal and political philosophy. R. A. Duff has argued, for example, a states that perpetrates social injustice lacks the standing to punish victims of such injustice who commit crimes. A crucial premiss in his argument concerns the fact that when courts in liberal society mete out legitimate criminal punishments, they are conceived as acting in the name of (...)
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  10.  20
    The labors of justice: democracy, respect, and judicial review.Jeffrey W. Howard - 2019 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 22 (2):176-199.
  11.  26
    The labors of justice: democracy, respect, and judicial review.Jeffrey W. Howard - 2019 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 22 (2):176-199.
  12.  65
    Let's make a deal: Quality and availability of second-stage information as a catalyst for change.Jeffrey N. Howard, Charles G. Lambdin & Darcee L. Datteri - 2007 - Thinking and Reasoning 13 (3):248 – 272.
    The Monty Hall Problem (MHP), a process of two-stage decision making, was presented in atypical form via a custom software game. Differing from the normal three-box MHP, the game added one additional box on-screen for each game—culminating on game 23 with 25 on-screen boxes to initially choose from. A total of 108 participants played 23 games (trials) in one of four conditions; (1) “Vanish” condition—all non-winning boxes totally removed from the screen; (2) “Empty” condition—all non-winning boxes remain on-screen, but with (...)
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  13.  26
    Laborde, liberalism, and religion.Aurélia Bardon & Jeffrey W. Howard - 2020 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 23 (1):1-8.
  14.  28
    Laborde, liberalism, and religion.Aurélia Bardon & Jeffrey W. Howard - 2020 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 23 (1):1-8.
    In this introduction, we provide a brief overview of the debate on religion in political philosophy. We present the main arguments defended by Cécile Laborde in Liberalism’s Religion and explain how these arguments contribute to the debate.
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  15.  35
    Defending broad neutrality.Jeffrey W. Howard - 2020 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 23 (1):36-47.
  16.  36
    Kidnapped: The Ethics of Paying Ransoms.Jeffrey W. Howard - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (4):675-688.
    Should governments pay ransoms to terrorist organisations that unjustly kidnap their citizens? The United Kingdom and the United States refuse to negotiate with terrorist groups that kidnap and threaten to kill their people. In contrast, continental European countries, such as France and Germany, have regularly paid ransoms to rescue hostages. Who is right? This debate has raged in the public domain in recent years, but no sustained attempt has been made to subject the matter to philosophical scrutiny. This article explores (...)
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  17.  35
    Yaffe on Democratic Citizenship and Juvenile Justice.Jeffrey W. Howard - 2020 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 14 (2):241-255.
    Why, exactly, should we punish children who commit crimes more leniently than adults who commit the same offenses? Gideon Yaffe thinks it is because they cannot vote, and so the strength of their reasons to obey the law is weaker than if they could. They are thus less culpable when they disobey. This argument invites an obvious objection: why not simply enfranchise children, thereby granting them legal reasons that are the same strength as enfranchised adults, and so permitting similarly severe (...)
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