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  1. Philosophy and Geography Ii: The Production of Public Space.Edward S. Casey, Ian Chaston, Edward Dimendberg, Matthew Gorton, John Gulick, Jean Hillier, Ted Kilian, Hugh Mason, Mario Pascalev, Neil Smith, John Stevenson, Mary Ann Tétreault, Luke Wallin & John White (eds.) - 1997 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Philosophers and geographers have converged on the topic of public space, fascinated and in many ways alarmed by fundamental changes in the way post-industrial societies produce space for public use, and in the way citizens of these same societies perceive and constitute themselves as a public. This volume advances this inquiry, making extensive use of political and social theory, while drawing intimate connections between political principles, social processes, and the commonplaces of our everyday environments.
     
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  2. Towns Within Towns: From Incompossibility to Inclusive Disjunction in Urban Spatial Planning.Jonathan Metzger & Jean Hillier - 2021 - Deleuze and Guattari Studies 15 (1):40-64.
    We contemplate Deleuze and Guattari's discussion of in/compossibility through engagement with practices of spatial planning and development at the urban fringe in Australia. In such sites of ecosystem transformation, the presence of wildlife, such as mosquitoes, is often deemed incompossible with felicitous human habitation. We suggest that regarding worlds like those of mosquitoes and humans as divergent, rather than incompossible, opens up opportunities for inclusive disjunctive syntheses which affirm the disjoined terms without excluding one from the other. Relating inclusive disjunction (...)
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  3.  32
    Deleuzian Dragons: Thinking Chinese Strategic Spatial Planning with Gilles Deleuze.Kang Cao & Jean Hillier - 2013 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 7 (3):390-405.
    As symbols of adaptability and transformation, together with qualities of vigilance and intelligence, we argue the relevance of dragons for spatial planning in China. We develop a metaphorical concept – the green dragon – for grasping the condition of contemporary Chinese societies and for facilitating the development of theories and practices of spatial planning which are able to face the challenges of rapid change. We ask Chinese scholars and spatial planners to liberate Deleuzian potential for strategic spatial planning in a (...)
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    What Values? Whose Values?Jean Hillier - 1999 - Philosophy and Geography 2 (2):179 – 199.
    Land use planning decisions are recognised as being value judgements, yet the questions of what values and whose values are rarely addressed. Values may be absolute or relative, intrinsic or extrinsic, passionately emotional or coolly reasoned, and 'measured' in a multitude of ways: by rarity, economics, social or aesthetic interpretations. Using examples of land use planning in Western Australia, I examine some of the complex values brought into play. I conclude that we need to explore, rather than reject, the plurality (...)
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    Liquid Spaces of Engagement: Entering the Waves with Antony Gormley and Olafur Eliasson.Jean Hillier - 2012 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 6 (1):132-148.
    Antony Gormley's Another Place and Olafur Eliasson's Your watercolour machine exemplify passages and combinations of smooth and striated space as beings of sensation on planes of technical and aesthetic composition. They are frames which striate the smoothness of light, water, molten iron, etc., using scientific planes of reference. Smooth and striated mix as boundaries between visitors’ bodies and installation become permeable. Optic becomes tactile, becomes haptic, generative engagement. Both artists experiment with the interface between striated and smooth to encourage visitors (...)
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    What Values? Whose Values?Jean Hillier - 1999 - Ethics, Place and Environment 2 (2):179-199.
    Land use planning decisions are recognised as being value judgements, yet the questions of what values and whose values are rarely addressed. Values may be absolute or relative, intrinsic or extrinsic, passionately emotional or coolly reasoned, and ‘measured’ in a multitude of ways: by rarity, economics, social or aesthetic interpretations. Using examples of land use planning in Western Australia, I examine some of the complex values brought into play. I conclude that we need to explore, rather than reject, the plurality (...)
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    Paradise Proclaimed? Towards a Theoretical Understanding of Representations of Nature in Land Use Planning Decision‐Making.Jean Hillier - 1998 - Philosophy and Geography 1 (1):77 – 91.
    Land use planning, based in either traditional liberalist philosophy or the emerging pragmatist philosophy formalizes an anthropocentric, reductionist division within itself: between nature (land) and society (use), ignoring the socially constructed character of both terms. Representations of nature become political issues mediated through the planning system, with the various actants and their networks attempting to exert power over others in order to influence the outcome. Based on a theoretical understanding of, by deconstructing the different representations of nature/the environment and identifying (...)
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    Paradise Proclaimed? Towards a Theoretical Understanding of Representations of Nature in Land Use Planning Decision-Making.Jean Hillier - 1998 - Ethics, Place and Environment 1 (1):77-91.
    Land use planning, based in either traditional liberalist philosophy or the emerging pragmatist philosophy formalizes an anthropocentric, reductionist division within itself: between nature and society, ignoring the socially constructed character of both terms. Representations of nature become political issues mediated through the planning system, with the various actants and their networks attempting to exert power over others in order to influence the outcome. Based on a theoretical understanding of, by deconstructing the different representations of nature/the environment and identifying the discourses (...)
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