Results for 'Jason R. Gatliff'

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  1. Happiness is not Well-being.Jason R. Raibley - 2012 - Journal of Happiness Studies 13 (6):1105-1129.
    This paper attempts to explain the conceptual connections between happiness and well-being. It first distinguishes episodic happiness from happiness in the personal attribute sense. It then evaluates two recent proposals about the connection between happiness and well-being: (1) the idea that episodic happiness and well-being both have the same fundamental determinants, so that a person is well-off to a particular degree in virtue of the fact that they are happy to that degree, and (2) the idea that happiness in the (...)
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  2. Values, Agency, and Welfare.Jason R. Raibley - 2013 - Philosophical Topics 41 (1):187-214.
    The values-based approach to welfare holds that it is good for one to realize goals, activities, and relationships with which one strongly (and stably) identifies. This approach preserves the subjectivity of welfare while affirming that a life well lived must be active, engaged, and subjectively meaningful. As opposed to more objective theories, it is unified, naturalistic, and ontologically parsimonious. However, it faces objections concerning the possibility of self-sacrifice, disinterested and paradoxical values, and values that are out of sync with physical (...)
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  3.  90
    Welfare over Time and the Case for Holism.Jason R. Raibley - 2012 - Philosophical Papers 41 (2):239 - 265.
    Abstract Theories of personal well-being are typically developed so that they render verdicts on (a) how well-off a person is at a moment, (b) how well-off a person is over an interval of time, and (c) how good a whole life is for the person who lives it. Conative theories of welfare posit welfare-atoms that consist, e.g., in episodes of desire-satisfaction, aim-achievement, or values-realisation. Most extant conative theories are additive: they compute well-being over time - up to and including the (...)
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  4.  82
    The neurochemistry and social flow of singing: bonding and oxytocin.Jason R. Keeler, Edward A. Roth, Brittany L. Neuser, John M. Spitsbergen, Daniel J. M. Waters & John-Mary Vianney - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  5.  8
    Black knowledges/Black struggles: essays in critical epistemology.Jason R. Ambroise & Sabine Bröck-Sallah (eds.) - 2015 - Liverpool: Liverpool University Press.
    Black Knowledges/Black Struggles: Essays in Critical Epistemology explores the central, but often critically neglected role of knowledge and epistemic formations within social movements for human emancipation. This collection examines the systemic connection that exists between the empirical subordination of "Black" peoples globally and the conceptual negation that subordinates or renders this population invisible within the epistemes of the West. The collection recognizes that as peoples of "Black" African and Afro-mixed descent mobilize against their dehumanized status within Western modernity, they are (...)
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  6.  12
    Further problematizing the potential for a more unified experimental, scientific psychology: A comment on Mandler.Jason R. Goertzen - 2011 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 31 (4):247-249.
    In response to Mandler , I argue in this comment that a more unified psychology generally, and a more unified experimental, scientific psychology specifically, are more difficult to obtain than he suggests. Furthermore, I contend that Mandler does not sufficiently maintain a clear distinction between disciplinary psychology generally, and experimental, scientific psychology, specifically in his discussions of broaching greater unity. This distinction is particularly important, as how it is treated has serious implications for the many specializations and schools of thought (...)
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  7. Objectivity/Subjectivity of Values.Jason R. Raibley - 2014 - In Alex C. Michalos (ed.), Encyclopedia of Quality of Life and Well-Being Research. Springer. pp. 4438-4443.
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  8.  33
    Memory and Technology: How We Use Information in the Brain and the World.Jason R. Finley, Farah Naaz & Francine W. Goh - 2018 - Cham: Springer Verlag. Edited by Francine W. Goh & Farah Naaz.
    How is technology changing the way people remember? This book explores the interplay of memory stored in the brain and outside of the brain, providing a thorough interdisciplinary review of the current literature, including relevant theoretical frameworks from across a variety of disciplines in the sciences, arts, and humanities. It also presents the findings of a rich and novel empirical data set, based on a comprehensive survey on the shifting interplay of internal and external memory in the 21st century. Results (...)
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  9. Atomism and Holism in the Philosophy of Well-being.Jason R. Raibley - 2015 - In Guy Fletcher (ed.), The Routledge Handbook to the Philosophy of Well-being. Routledge.
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  10. At the Bar of Conscience: A Kantian Argument for Slavery Reparations.Jason R. Fisette - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (5):674-702.
    Arguments for slavery reparations have fallen out of favor even as reparations for other forms of racial injustice are taken more seriously. This retreat is unsurprising, as arguments for slavery reparations often rely on two normatively irregular claims: that reparations are owed to the dead (as opposed to, say, their living heirs), and that the present generation inherits an as yet unrequited guilt from past generations. Outside of some strands of Black thought and activism on slavery reparations, these claims are (...)
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  11.  14
    Feeling Competitiveness or Empathy Towards Negotiation Counterparts Mitigates Sex Differences in Lying.Jason R. Pierce & Leigh Thompson - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (1):71-87.
    Men typically express more willingness than women to perpetrate fraudulent acts like lying in negotiations. However, women express just as much willingness in some cases. We develop and test a theory to explain these mixed findings. Specifically, we hypothesize that situational cues that bring about competitive or empathic feelings mitigate sex differences in lying to negotiation counterparts. Results from four experiments confirm our hypotheses. Experiment 1 showed that men and women express equal willingness to lie when negotiating with counterparts toward (...)
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  12.  60
    Achievement, enjoyment, and the things we care about: a theory of personal well-being.Jason R. Raibley - 2007 - Dissertation, University of Massachusetts Amherst
    This dissertation develops a theory of personal well-being---i.e., a theory of what is it for a person's life to go well for them. The proposed theory is called "the successful activity view of well-being." It is an end-neutral account of individual welfare that primarily values the pursuit, achievement, and enjoyment of ends that are important to a person. The parts of this process---e.g., the pursuit of ends, the achievement of ends, the enjoyment of activities and situations, and even the satisfaction (...)
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  13. Ambivalence, well-being, and prudential rationality.Jason R. Raibley - 2020 - In Berit Brogaard & Dimitria Electra Gatzia (eds.), The Philosophy and Psychology of Ambivalence: Being of Two Minds. New York, NY: Routledge.
     
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  14.  11
    Time Theft: Exposing a Subtle Yet Serious Driver of Socioeconomic Inequality.Jason R. Pierce, Laura M. Giurge & Brad Aeon - forthcoming - Business and Society.
    Socioeconomic inequality is perpetuated and exacerbated by an overlooked yet serious epidemic of time theft: the act of causing others to lose their time without adequate cause, compensation, or consent. We explain why time theft goes unnoticed, how it drives socioeconomic inequality, and what businesses and policymakers can do to address it.
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  15.  29
    Innovation in biological microscopy: Current status and future directions.Jason R. Swedlow - 2012 - Bioessays 34 (5):333-340.
    The current revolution in biological microscopy stems from the realisation that advances in optics and computational tools and automation make the modern microscope an instrument that can access all scales relevant to modern biology – from individual molecules all the way to whole tissues and organisms and from single snapshots to time‐lapse recordings sampling from milliseconds to days. As these and more new technologies appear, the challenges of delivering them to the community grows as well. I discuss some of these (...)
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  16.  64
    Hume on the Stoic Rational Passions and "Original Existences".Jason R. Fisette - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (4):609-639.
    I argue that Hume’s characterization of the passions as “original existences” is shaped by his preoccupation with Stoicism, and is not (as most commentators suppose) a ridiculous or trifling remark. My argument has three parts. First, I show that Hume’s description of the passions as “original existences” is properly understood as part of his argument against the possibility of passions caused by reason alone (rational passions). Second, I establish that Hume was responding to the Stoics, who claimed that a rational (...)
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  17.  22
    John Kekes, The Human Condition.Jason R. Raibley - 2012 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (4):596-599.
  18. Hume on the Lockean Metaphysics of Secondary Qualities.Jason R. Fisette - 2014 - Hume Studies 40 (1):95-136.
    Hume is widely read as committed to a kind of anti-realism about secondary qualities, on which secondary qualities are less real than primary qualities. I argue that Hume is not an anti-realist about secondary qualities as such, and I explain why Hume’s remarks on the primary-secondary distinction are better read as abstaining from the realist/anti-realist debate as it was understood by modern philosophers such as Locke. By contextualizing Hume’s discussion of the primary-secondary distinction in Treatise 1.4.4 as a response to (...)
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  19.  37
    Corrected Feedback: A Procedure to Enhance Recall of Informed Consent to Research Among Substance Abusing Offenders.Douglas B. Marlowe, Jason R. Croft, Karen L. Dugosh, David S. Festinger & Patricia L. Arabia - 2010 - Ethics and Behavior 20 (5):387-399.
    This study examined the efficacy of corrected feedback for improving consent recall throughout the course of an ongoing longitudinal study. Participants were randomly assigned to either a corrected feedback or a no-feedback control condition. Participants completed a consent quiz 2 weeks after consenting to the host study and at months 1, 2, and 3. The corrected feedback group received corrections to erroneous responses and the no-feedback control group did not. The feedback group displayed significantly greater recall overall and in specific (...)
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  20.  36
    The Good, the Right, Life And Death: Essays in Honor of Fred Feldman.Kris McDaniel, Jason R. Raibley, Richard Feldman & Michael J. Zimmerman (eds.) - 2005 - Ashgate.
    This is an edited collection containing papers on intrinsic value, consequentialism, the evil of death, among others.
  21. Evaluation of information retrieval for E-discovery.Douglas W. Oard, Jason R. Baron, Bruce Hedin, David D. Lewis & Stephen Tomlinson - 2010 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 18 (4):347-386.
    The effectiveness of information retrieval technology in electronic discovery (E-discovery) has become the subject of judicial rulings and practitioner controversy. The scale and nature of E-discovery tasks, however, has pushed traditional information retrieval evaluation approaches to their limits. This paper reviews the legal and operational context of E-discovery and the approaches to evaluating search technology that have evolved in the research community. It then describes a multi-year effort carried out as part of the Text Retrieval Conference to develop evaluation methods (...)
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  22.  24
    Review of John Kekes, The Moral Significance of Styles of Life[REVIEW]Jason R. Raibley - 2010 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (2).
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  23.  30
    Tiberius, Valerie. Well-Being as Value Fulfillment: How We Can Help Each Other to Live Well. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018. Pp. 240. $35.00 (cloth). [REVIEW]Jason R. Raibley - 2021 - Ethics 131 (3):635-641.
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  24.  50
    Tiberius, Valerie . The Reflective Life: Living Wisely with Our Limits . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008 . Pp. 240. $60.00 (cloth). [REVIEW]Jason R. Raibley - 2010 - Ethics 120 (3):640-644.
  25.  25
    Electrophysiological signals associated with fluency of different levels of processing reveal multiple contributions to recognition memory.Bingbing Li, Jason R. Taylor, Wei Wang, Chuanji Gao & Chunyan Guo - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 53:1-13.
  26.  14
    Ethical argument for establishing good manufacturing practice for phage therapy in the UK.Mehrunisha Suleman, Jason R. Clark, Susan Bull & Joshua D. Jones - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) poses an increasing threat to patient care and population health and there is a growing need for novel therapies to tackle AMR. Bacteriophage (phage) therapy is a re-emerging antimicrobial strategy with the potential to transform how bacterial infections are treated in patients and populations. Currently, in the UK, phages can be used as unlicensed medicinal products on a ‘named-patient’ basis. We make an ethical case for why it is crucially important for the UK to invest in Good (...)
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  27.  41
    The Red and the Real. [REVIEW]Jason R. Fisette - 2009 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 30 (2):440-444.
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  28.  15
    Understanding Human Lung Development through In Vitro Model Systems.Renee F. Conway, Tristan Frum, Ansley S. Conchola & Jason R. Spence - 2020 - Bioessays 42 (6):2000006.
    An abundance of information about lung development in animal models exists; however, comparatively little is known about lung development in humans. Recent advances using primary human lung tissue combined with the use of human in vitro model systems, such as human pluripotent stem cell‐derived tissue, have led to a growing understanding of the mechanisms governing human lung development. They have illuminated key differences between animal models and humans, underscoring the need for continued advancements in modeling human lung development and utilizing (...)
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  29.  15
    Principle of salvage: A mischaracterization of military medicine.Jason Gatliff - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (2):17 – 18.
  30.  38
    Decision support for detecting sensitive text in government records.Karl Branting, Bradford Brown, Chris Giannella, James Van Guilder, Jeff Harrold, Sarah Howell & Jason R. Baron - forthcoming - Artificial Intelligence and Law:1-27.
    Freedom of information laws promote transparency by permitting individuals and organizations to obtain government documents. However, exemptions from disclosure are necessary to protect privacy and to permit government officials to deliberate freely. Deliberative language is often the most challenging and burdensome exemption to detect, leading to high processing costs and delays in responding to open-records requests. This paper describes a novel deliberative-language detection model trained on a new annotated training set. The deliberative-language detection model is a component of a decision-support (...)
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  31.  6
    Priming recognition memory test cues: No evidence for an attributional basis of recollection.Carmen F. Ionita, Deborah Talmi & Jason R. Taylor - 2019 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 42.
    We argue that while the proposed memory model by Bastin et al. can explain familiarity-based memory judgements through the interaction of a core representation system and an attribution system, recollection-based memory judgements are not based on non-mnemonic signals being attributed to memory.
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  32.  17
    Allhoff, Fritz. Ed. 2008. Physicians at war: The dual-loyalties challenge. [REVIEW]Jason Gatliff - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (3):391-392.
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  33. Self-Driving Cars and Engineering Ethics: The Need for a System Level Analysis.Jason Borenstein, Joseph R. Herkert & Keith W. Miller - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (2):383-398.
    The literature on self-driving cars and ethics continues to grow. Yet much of it focuses on ethical complexities emerging from an individual vehicle. That is an important but insufficient step towards determining how the technology will impact human lives and society more generally. What must complement ongoing discussions is a broader, system level of analysis that engages with the interactions and effects that these cars will have on one another and on the socio-technical systems in which they are embedded. To (...)
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  34.  62
    Contextual variations in implicit evaluation.Jason P. Mitchell, Brian A. Nosek & Mahzarin R. Banaji - 2003 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 132 (3):455.
  35.  24
    Dissociating Perceptual Confidence from Discrimination Accuracy Reveals No Influence of Metacognitive Awareness on Working Memory.Jason Samaha, John J. Barrett, Andrew D. Sheldon, Joshua J. LaRocque & Bradley R. Postle - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
  36.  35
    Prestimulus alpha-band power biases visual discrimination confidence, but not accuracy.Jason Samaha, Luca Iemi & Bradley R. Postle - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 54:47-55.
  37.  33
    When We Teach About “Base of the Pyramid” Business, Are We Teaching a Different Theory of Business in Society?R. Bruce Paton & Jason Harris-Boundy - 2007 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:534-535.
    Business schools are slowly waking up to the reality that most of the products and services discussed in management curricula serve a small portion of humanity. A small number of business schools has begun to address businesses designed to meet the needs of the poor (the so called “base of the pyramid”) in business in society courses or in dedicated elective courses. As the world heads into an era defined by pervasive uncertainty, perhaps a business mindset focusing on management in (...)
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  38.  27
    The Private Practicing Physician‐Investigator: Ethical Implications of Clinical Research in the Office Setting.Jason E. Klein & Alan R. Fleischman - 2002 - Hastings Center Report 32 (4):22-26.
    Drug companies are moving their research from academic medical centers to physicians’ private offices. The shift brings in more subjects, and could mean faster and better results. It also changes the physician's relationship to patients, dangles monetary lures in front of physicians, and could produce subjects who don't understand what they're participating in and results that are unreliable.
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  39.  8
    The response of lentil cultivars to sowing date and plant density in the southern Mallee of Victoria.Jason Brand, R. Armstrong, M. Materne & G. Antonoff - 2003 - Emergence: Complexity and Organization 283 (2.35):260.
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  40. t Tree of life : Aquinas, disability and transhumanism.R. Miguel J. Romero & $R. Jason T. Eberl - 2023 - In Devan Stahl (ed.), Bioenhancement technologies and the vulnerable body: a theological engagement. Waco: Baylor University Press.
     
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  41.  28
    Rhetoric, Methodology, and a Question of Onto-Epistemological Access.Jason Kalin & David R. Gruber - 2022 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 55 (2):127-151.
    ABSTRACT Assuming that withdrawal is ontological, no method of inquiry will breach the “essence” of an object. As such, this article raises a question of onto-epistemological access to complicate the development of recent rhetorical theories and rhetorical method/ologies informed by object-oriented ontologies and new materialisms. This article wonders about the drive to know and to feel forwarded in these rhetorical method/ologies without discussing how things hide from other things and from themselves, how things elude critics, and how scholars access others (...)
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  42.  18
    When Do Pediatricians Call the Ethics Consultation Service? Impact of Clinical Experience and Formal Ethics Training.Mark C. Navin, Jason Adam Wasserman, Susanna Jain, Katie R. Baughman & Naomi T. Laventhal - 2020 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 11 (2):83-90.
    Background: Previous research shows that pediatricians inconsistently utilize the ethics consultation service (ECS). Methods: Pediatricians in two suburban, Midwestern academic hospitals were asked to reflect on their ethics training and utilization of ECS via an anonymous, electronic survey distributed in 2017 and 2018, and analyzed in 2018. Participants reported their clinical experience, exposure to formal and informal ethics training, use of formal and informal ethics consultations, and potential barriers to formal consultation. Results: Less experienced pediatricians were more likely to utilize (...)
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  43.  61
    Virtue, Well-being, and the Good Life.Jason R. Raibley - 2018 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 15 (6):767-780.
    Inspired by Aristotle, Paul Bloomfield holds that all genuine reasons for action are explained in terms of one basic goal: to live a Good Life. But living morally—choosing and performing brave, temperate, just, and wise actions—is necessary for the Good Life. Using ideas from Kant and Sidgwick, Bloomfield argues that immorality is inherently self-defeating: in disrespecting others, one disrespects oneself. Moreover, immoralists—who believe that immoral action often conduces to self-interest—operate with a self-defeating conception of happiness. Bloomfield succeeds in explaining why (...)
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  44.  10
    Spontaneous alpha-band amplitude predicts subjective visibility but not discrimination accuracy during high-level perception.Jason Samaha, Joshua J. LaRocque & Bradley R. Postle - 2022 - Consciousness and Cognition 102:103337.
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  45.  27
    Should Researchers Offer Results to Family Members of Cancer Biobank Participants? A Mixed-Methods Study of Proband and Family Preferences.Deborah R. Gordon, Carmen Radecki Breitkopf, Marguerite Robinson, Wesley O. Petersen, Jason S. Egginton, Kari G. Chaffee, Gloria M. Petersen, Susan M. Wolf & Barbara A. Koenig - 2019 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 10 (1):1-22.
    Background: Genomic analysis may reveal both primary and secondary findings with direct relevance to the health of probands’ biological relatives. Researchers question their obligations to return findings not only to participants but also to family members. Given the social value of privacy protection, should researchers offer a proband’s results to family members, including after the proband’s death? Methods: Preferences were elicited using interviews and a survey. Respondents included probands from two pancreatic cancer research resources, plus biological and nonbiological family members. (...)
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  46.  22
    Rethinking Human Embryo Research Policies.Kirstin R. W. Matthews, Ana S. Iltis, Nuria Gallego Marquez, Daniel S. Wagner, Jason Scott Robert, Inmaculada de Melo-Martín, Marieke Bigg, Sarah Franklin, Soren Holm, Ingrid Metzler, Matteo A. Molè, Jochen Taupitz, Giuseppe Testa & Jeremy Sugarman - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (1):47-51.
    It now seems technically feasible to culture human embryos beyond the “fourteen‐day limit,” which has the potential to increase scientific understanding of human development and perhaps improve infertility treatments. The fourteen‐day limit was adopted as a compromise but subsequently has been considered an ethical line. Does it remain relevant in light of technological advances permitting embryo maturation beyond it? Should it be changed and, if so, how and why? What justifications would be necessary to expand the limit, particularly given that (...)
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  47.  24
    Perceptual load influences auditory space perception in the ventriloquist aftereffect.Ranmalee Eramudugolla, Marc R. Kamke, Salvador Soto-Faraco & Jason B. Mattingley - 2011 - Cognition 118 (1):62-74.
    A period of exposure to trains of simultaneous but spatially offset auditory and visual stimuli can induce a temporary shift in the perception of sound location. This phenomenon, known as the 'ventriloquist aftereffect', reflects a realignment of auditory and visual spatial representations such that they approach perceptual alignment despite their physical spatial discordance. Such dynamic changes to sensory representations are likely to underlie the brain's ability to accommodate inter-sensory discordance produced by sensory errors (particularly in sound localization) and variability in (...)
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  48.  8
    Prior expectation of objects in space is dependent on the direction of gaze.Brian Odegaard, Ulrik R. Beierholm, Jason Carpenter & Ladan Shams - 2019 - Cognition 182 (C):220-226.
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  49.  22
    Advancing a Welfare-Based Model in Medical Decision.Lalit K. R. Krishna, Jason Te Tay, Deborah S. Watkinson & Alethea Chung Pheng Yee - 2015 - Asian Bioethics Review 7 (3):306-320.
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  50.  19
    Rethinking Human Embryo Research Policies.Kirstin R. W. Matthews, Ana S. Iltis, Nuria Gallego Marquez, Daniel S. Wagner, Jason Scott Robert, Inmaculada Melo-Martín, Marieke Bigg, Sarah Franklin, Soren Holm, Ingrid Metzler, Matteo A. Molè, Jochen Taupitz, Giuseppe Testa & Jeremy Sugarman - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (1):47-51.
    It now seems technically feasible to culture human embryos beyond the “fourteen‐day limit,” which has the potential to increase scientific understanding of human development and perhaps improve infertility treatments. The fourteen‐day limit was adopted as a compromise but subsequently has been considered an ethical line. Does it remain relevant in light of technological advances permitting embryo maturation beyond it? Should it be changed and, if so, how and why? What justifications would be necessary to expand the limit, particularly given that (...)
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