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Janette Dinishak
University of California, Santa Cruz
  1.  18
    Autistic Autobiography and Hermeneutical Injustice.Janette Dinishak - 2021 - Metaphilosophy 52 (5):556-569.
    This paper examines epistemic injustice in knowledge production concerning autism. Its aim is to further our understanding of the distinctive shapes of the kinds of epistemic injustices against autists. The paper shows how Ian Hacking’s work on autistic autobiography brings into view a form of hermeneutical injustice that autists endure with respect to their firsthand accounts of their experiences of autism. It explores how understanding the distinctive shape of this hermeneutical injustice can help us further appreciate dangers and harms of (...)
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  2.  29
    Autism, Aspect-Perception, and Neurodiversity.Janette Dinishak - 2019 - Philosophical Psychology 32 (6):874-897.
    This paper examines the appeal, made by some philosophers, to Wittgenstein’s notion of aspect-blindness in order to better understand autistic perception and social cognition. I articulate and assess different ways of understanding what it means to say that autists are aspect-blind. While more attention to the perceptual dimensions of autism is a welcome development in philosophical explorations of the condition, I argue that there are significant problems with attributing aspect-blindness to autists. The empirical basis for the attribution of aspect-blindness to (...)
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  3.  1
    Experiencing Social Connection: A Qualitative Study of Mothers of Nonspeaking Autistic Children.Janette Dinishak, Vikram Jaswal, Christine Stephan & Nameera Akhtar - 2020 - PLoS ONE 11 (15):online.
    Autistic children do not consistently show conventional signs of social engagement, which some have interpreted to mean that they are not interested in connecting with other people. If someone does not act like they are interested in connecting with you, it may make it difficult to feel connected to them. And yet, some parents report feeling strongly connected to their autistic children. We conducted phenomenological interviews with 13 mothers to understand how they experienced connection with their 5- to 14-year-old nonspeaking (...)
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  4. Empathy, Like-Mindedness, and Autism.Janette Dinishak - 2016 - In Mark Risjord (ed.), Normativity and Naturalism in the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Routledge. pp. 113-134.
    In this paper I examine what autism can teach us about the role of like-mindedness in the achieving of interpersonal understanding. I explain how recent work on affective, sensory, perceptual, and cognitive atypicalities in people with autism underscores forms of like-mindedness that are largely neglected in contemporary discussions of interpersonal understanding. Autists and non-autists may have sensory, perceptual, and movement differences that make for pervasive differences in their perspectives on and ways of being in both the physical and social world. (...)
     
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  5. ‘Blind’ to the Obvious.Janette Dinishak - 2014 - History of the Human Sciences 27 (4):59-76.
    The philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein cites the Gestalt psychologist Wolfgang Koehler almost as often as he cites William James in his posthumously published writings on the philosophy of psychology. Yet, few treatments of the Wittgenstein–Koehler relation in the philosophical literature could be called sustained discussions. Moreover, most of them treat Koehler as a mere whipping boy for Wittgenstein, one more opportunity to criticize the practice of psychologists. This article emphasizes how much the two thinkers agreed, and the extent to which some (...)
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  6.  82
    Wittgenstein on the Place of the Concept “Noticing an Aspect”.Janette Dinishak - 2013 - Philosophical Investigations 36 (1):320-339.
    Seeing aspects is a dominant theme in Wittgenstein's 1940s writings on philosophy of psychology. Interpreters disagree about what Wittgenstein was trying to do in these discussions. I argue that interpreting Wittgenstein's observations about the interrelations between “noticing an aspect” and other psychological concepts as a systematic theory of aspect-seeing diminishes key lessons of Wittgenstein's explorations: these interrelations are enormously complicated and “noticing an aspect” resists neat classification. Further, Wittgenstein invites us to engage in his “placing activity,” and by doing so (...)
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  7.  16
    The Value of Giving Autistic Testimony a Substantial Role in the Science of Autism.Janette Dinishak - 2019 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 42.
    Jaswal and Akhtar argue that taking seriously autistic testimony will help make the science of autism more humane, accurate, and useful. In this commentary, I pose two questions about autistic testimony's role in a better science of autism and extract a general lesson about the value of autistic testimony from the authors’ arguments.
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  8. A Critical Examination of Mindblindness as a Metaphor for Autism.Janette Dinishak - 2013 - Child Development Perspectives 7 (2):110-114.
    Metaphor—describing one thing in terms of another—is a common tool used to grasp what is unknown. Perhaps because we do not understand a lot about autism, many metaphors appear in both scientific and nonscientific descriptions of autism. The metaphor of mindblindness is especially pervasive in the scientific literature. We discuss three limitations of this metaphor: It obscures the fact that both autistic and non autistic individuals contribute to the social and communicative difficulties between them, it carries strong negative connotations, and (...)
     
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  9. Wittgenstein and Köhler on Seeing and Seeing Aspects.Janette Dinishak - 2008 - Dissertation, University of Toronto
    This thesis examines the relation between philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein’s 1940s writings on seeing and seeing aspects and Gestalt psychologist Wolfgang Köhler’s theory of perception as set out in his Gestalt Psychology (1929). I argue that much of the existing literature on the Wittgenstein-Köhler relation distorts Köhler’s ideas and thus also Wittgenstein’s engagement with Köhler’s ideas. This double distortion underrates Köhler’s insights, misconstrues Wittgenstein’s complaints against Köhler, and masks points of contact between the two concerning the nature and description of human (...)
     
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  10.  50
    Reviews. [REVIEW]Bryce Huebner, Janette Dinishak, James A. Marcum & Jelle De Schrijver - 2008 - Philosophical Psychology 21 (6):843 – 858.
  11. Embracing the In-Betweenness of Aspect-Perception's Normative Dimensions.Janette Dinishak - 2022 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review 11.
    : This paper examines the following two ideas and their relations: aspect-perception is a perceptual experience; veridicality is the primary standard for evaluating the success of a perceptual experience. I argue that a valuable lesson to glean from Wittgenstein’s investigations of aspect-perception is that aspect-perception is “in-between” when it comes to whether and how veridicality is at issue in it. Yet it does not follow from this in-betweenness that there is no standard by which we evaluate aspect-perception, no notion of (...)
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  12.  15
    Wittgenstein on the Place of the Concept “Noticing an Aspect”.Janette Dinishak - 2013 - Philosophical Investigations 36 (4):320-339.
    Seeing aspects is a dominant theme in Wittgenstein's 1940s writings on philosophy of psychology. Interpreters disagree about what Wittgenstein was trying to do in these discussions. I argue that interpreting Wittgenstein's observations about the interrelations between “noticing an aspect” and other psychological concepts as a systematic theory of aspect‐seeing diminishes key lessons of Wittgenstein's explorations: these interrelations are enormously complicated and “noticing an aspect” resists neat classification. Further, Wittgenstein invites us to engage in his “placing activity,” and by doing so (...)
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