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  1.  10
    Changes in Academy/Industry/State Relations in Canada: The Creation and Development of the Networks of Centres of Excellence. [REVIEW]Donald Fisher, Janet Atkinson-Grosjean & Dawn House - 2001 - Minerva 39 (3):299-325.
    The Networks of Centres of Excellence programme is perhaps Canada's most dramatic science policy innovation since theFirst World War. This article traces its development, using documentary analysis and interviews with the policy actors responsible for conceiving and implementing the programme.Established in 1989, the networks were explicitly designed to change the norms of science. The intention was to instil an approach to long-term fundamental research that considered possibilities of use from the start. Of equal importance was the idea that management was (...)
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  2.  30
    Moral Economies in Science: From Ideal to Pragmatic.Janet Atkinson-Grosjean & Cory Fairley - 2009 - Minerva 47 (2):147-170.
    In the following pages we discuss three historical cases of moral economies in science: Drosophila genetics, late twentieth century American astronomy, and collaborations between American drug companies and medical scientists in the interwar years. An examination of the most striking differences and similarities between these examples, and the conflicts internal to them, reveals constitutive features of moral economies, and the ways in which they are formed, negotiated, and altered. We critically evaluate these three examples through the filters of rational choice, (...)
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  3.  24
    The Roles of User/Producer Hybrids in the Production of Translational Science.Conor M. W. Douglas, Bryn Lander, Cory Fairley & Janet Atkinson-Grosjean - 2015 - Social Epistemology 29 (3):323-343.
    This paper explores the interface between users and producers of translational science through three case studies. It argues that effective TS requires a breakdown between user and producer roles: users become producers and producers become users. In making this claim, we challenge conventional understandings of TS as well as linear models of innovation. Policy-makers and funders increasingly expect TS and its associated socioeconomic benefits to occur when funding scientific research. We argue that a better understanding of the hybridity between users (...)
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