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  1.  40
    What does person‐centred care mean, if you weren't considered a person anyway: An engagement with person‐centred care and Black, queer, feminist, and posthuman approaches.Jamie B. Smith, Eva-Maria Willis & Jane Hopkins-Walsh - 2022 - Nursing Philosophy 23 (3):e12401.
    Despite the prominence of person‐centred care (PCC) in nursing, there is no general agreement on the assumptions and the meaning of PCC. We sympathize with the work of others who rethink PCC towards relational, embedded, and temporal selfhood rather than individual personhood. Our perspective addresses criticism of humanist assumptions in PCC using critical posthumanism as a diffraction from dominant values We highlight the problematic realities that might be produced in healthcare, leading to some people being more likely to be disenfranchised (...)
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  2.  22
    The Vitruvian nurse and burnout: New materialist approaches to impossible ideals.Jamie Smith, Eva Willis, Jane Hopkins-Walsh, Jess Dillard-Wright & Brandon Brown - 2024 - Nursing Inquiry 31 (1):e12538.
    The Vitruvian Man is a metaphor for the “ideal man” by feminist posthuman philosopher Rosi Braidotti (2013) as a proxy for eurocentric humanist ideals. The first half of this paper extends Braidotti's concept by thinking about the metaphor of the “ideal nurse” (Vitruvian nurse) and how this metaphor contributes to racism, oppression, and burnout in nursing and might restrict the professionalization of nursing. The Vitruvian nurse is an idealized and perfected form of a nurse with self‐sacrificial language (re)producing self‐sacrificing expectations. (...)
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  3.  25
    The role of philosophy in the development and practice of nursing: Past, present and future.Miriam Bender, Pamela J. Grace, Catherine Green, Jane Hopkins-Walsh, Marit Kirkevold, Olga Petrovskaya, Esma D. Paljevic & Derek Sellman - 2021 - Nursing Philosophy 22 (4):e12363.
    This article summarizes a virtual live‐streamed panel event that occurred in August 2020 and was cosponsored by the International Philosophy of Nursing Society (IPONS) and the University of California, Irvine's Center for Nursing Philosophy. The event consisted of a series of three self‐contained panel discussions focusing on the past, present and future of IPONS and was moderated by the current Chair of IPONS, Catherine Green. The first panel discussion explored the history of IPONS and the journal Nursing Philosophy. The second (...)
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  4.  14
    Mattering: Per/forming nursing philosophy in the Chthulucene.Annie-Claude Laurin, Jane Hopkins-Walsh, Jamie B. Smith, Brandon Brown, Patrick Martin & Emmanuel Christian Tedjasukmana - 2023 - Nursing Philosophy 24 (3):e12452.
    This paper presents an overview of the process of entanglement at the 25th International Philosophy of Nursing Conference (IPNC) at University of California at Irvine held on August 18, 2022. Representing collective work from the US, Canada, UK and Germany, our panel entitled ‘What can critical posthuman philosophies do for nursing?’ examined critical posthumanism and its operations and potential in nursing. Critical posthumanism offers an antifascist, feminist, material, affective, and ecologically entangled approach to nursing and healthcare. Rather than focusing on (...)
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  5.  14
    Nursing for the Chthulucene: Abolition, affirmation, antifascism.Jane Hopkins-Walsh, Jessica Dillard-Wright & Brandon B. Brown - 2023 - Nursing Philosophy 24 (1):e12405.
    Critical posthumanism as a philosophical, antifascist nonhierarchical imagination for nursing offers a liberatory passageway forward amidst environmental collapse, an epic pandemic, global authoritarianism, extreme health and wealth disparities, over‐reliance on technology and empirics, and unjust societal systems based in whiteness. Drawing upon philosophical and theoretical works from Black and Indigenous scholars, Haraway's idea of the Chthulucene, Deleuze and Guattari's rhizomatic thought, and Kaba's abolitionist organizing among others, we as activist nurse scholars continue the speculative discussion outlined in prior papers. Here (...)
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  6.  15
    We a ll c are, ALL the time.Jamie B. Smith, Goda Klumbytė, Kay Sidebottom, Jess Dillard-Wright, Eva Willis, Brandon B. Brown & Jane Hopkins-Walsh - 2024 - Nursing Inquiry 31 (1):e12572.
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  7.  14
    Notes on [post]human nursing: What It MIGHT Be, What it is Not.Jess Dillard-Wright, Jamie B. Smith, Jane Hopkins-Walsh, Eva Willis, Brandon B. Brown & Emmanuel C. Tedjasukmana - 2024 - Nursing Inquiry 31 (1):e12562.
    With this paper, we walk out some central ideas about posthumanisms and the ways in which nursing is already deeply entangled with them. At the same time, we point to ways in which nursing might benefit from further entanglement with other ideas emerging from posthumanisms. We first offer up a brief history of posthumanisms, following multiple roots to several points of formation. We then turn to key flavors of posthuman thought to differentiate between them and clarify our collective understanding and (...)
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  8.  13
    Time for different stories: Reflections on IPONS panel addressing current debates in nursing theory, education and practice.Jane Hopkins-Walsh - 2022 - Nursing Philosophy 23 (4):e12412.
    On 4 February 2021 a group of nurse scholar‐educators, nurses and other interested folks came together for the second of two virtual events to think together about the role of philosophy in the nursing world. The live streamed open access event provided an opportunity in the COVID‐19 pandemic for over 400 people to listen to five nursing scholars' presentations and to interact virtually through comments in chat and on the @IPONSociety Twitter social media platform. By reading the comments and questions (...)
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