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Jane Dryden
Mount Allison University
  1. Digestion, Habit, and Being at Home: Hegel and the Gut as Ambiguous Other.Jane Dryden - 2016 - PhaenEx 11 (2):1-22.
    Recent work in the philosophy of biology argues that we must rethink the biological individual beyond the boundary of the species, given that a key part of our essential functioning is carried out by the bacteria in our intestines in a way that challenges any strictly genetic account of what is involved for the biological human. The gut is a kind of ambiguous other within our understanding of ourselves, particularly when we also consider the status of gastro-intestinal disorders. Hegel offers (...)
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  2.  10
    Responding to Gut Issues: Insights from Disability Theory.Jane Dryden - 2022 - Canadian Journal of Practical Philosophy 8 (1):1-23.
    “Gut issues” refers to any condition that affects our digestive systems and that causes pain or discomfort. The term points to the experience of our gut being an issue for us – interfering with our plans, undermining our bodily self-control, threatening our well-being. This paper aims to do three things: (1) to introduce and justify a disability theory approach to gut issues; (2) to use this lens to argue that the experience of gut issues has a social and relational dimension (...)
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  3.  44
    Embodiment and Vulnerability in Fichte and Hegel.Jane Dryden - 2013 - Dialogue 52 (1):109-128.
    À partir de Fichte et Hegel, ce texte explore l’argument selon lequel la vulnérabilité est importante parce que, partagée par tous les êtres incarnés, elle contribue à nous lier avec les autres. La reconnaissance de notre vulnérabilité contribue aussi à la connaissance de soi. Leurs philosophies sont comparées pour démontrer que le système de Fichte l’incite à essayer de contrôler la vulnérabilité, tandis que celui de Hegel décrit une interaction entre la liberté et la détermination qui nous permet de nous (...)
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  4. Evil and Moral Responsibility in The Vocation of Man.Jane Dryden - 2013 - In Daniel Breazeale & Tom Rockmore (eds.), Fichte's Vocation of Man: New Interpretive and Critical Essays. Albany, NY, USA: State University of New York Press. pp. 185-198.
    When discussing the problem of evil, philosophers often distinguish between physical evil (harm caused within the natural world such as natural disasters, disease, and the like), and moral evil (harm caused by human agency). Mapping this traditional distinction is mapped onto the third section of Fichte’s The Vocation of Man would at first seem fairly straightforward: for Fichte, evil arising from nature occurs through “blind mechanism” and is unfree; in contrast, evil done by human beings arises out of free agency. (...)
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  5.  22
    The Gut Microbiome and the Imperative of Normalcy.Jane Dryden - 2023 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 16 (1):131-162.
    Healthism and ableism intertwine through an imperative of normalcy and the ensuing devaluing of those who fail to meet societally dominant norms and expectations around “normal” health. This paper tracks the effect of that imperative of normalcy through current research into gut microbiome therapies, using therapies targeting fatness and autism as examples. The complexity of the gut microbiome ought to encourage us to rethink our conception of ourselves and our embeddedness in the world; instead, the microbiome is transformed into one (...)
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  6.  11
    Disability, Teleology, and Human Development in German Idealism.Jane Dryden - 2023 - Journal of Philosophy of Disability 3:147-178.
    German idealist philosophers Kant and Hegel, who have had a significant influence on contemporary social and political theory, both insist on universal human freedom and dignity. However, they maintain teleological frameworks of human development which depend on distancing free and rational human agency from nature, leaving animality and “savageness” behind for a rational and spiritually developed future. This has implications for their implicit and explicit accounts of disability, which risk being reiterated today: insofar as disability is associated with being a (...)
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  7.  56
    Hegel, Feminist Philosophy, and Disability: Rereading Our History.Jane Dryden - 2013 - The Disability Studies Quarterly 33 (4).
    Although feminist philosophers have been critical of the gendered norms contained within the history of philosophy, they have not extended this critical analysis to norms concerning disability. In the history of Western philosophy, disability has often functioned as a metaphor for something that has gone awry. This trope, according to which disability is something that has gone wrong, is amply criticized within Disability Studies, though not within the tradition of philosophy itself or even within feminist philosophy. In this paper, I (...)
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  8. Evil and moral responsibility in the Vocation of man.Jane Dryden - 2013 - In Daniel Breazeale Tom Rockmore (ed.), Fichte’s Vocation of Man: New Interpretive and Critical Essays. State University of New York Press.
  9.  22
    Food Choices and Gut Issues.Jane Dryden - 2021 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 7 (3).
    People with gut issues are often constrained in the foods they are able to eat. The choices they are able to make about food, however, are shaped not merely by specific medical and dietary needs but also by social, relational, and environmental factors such as the presence of trusted and supportive others who take their needs seriously. Drawing on work in disability theory and relational autonomy, as well as interviews undertaken in summer 2019, the paper explores the ways that choices (...)
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  10.  9
    Guest Editor’s Introduction: “Philosophy and its Borders”.Jane Dryden - 2018 - Dialogue 57 (2):203-216.
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  11.  13
    Hegel's Anthropology: Transforming the Body.Jane Dryden - 2021 - In Joshua Wretzel & Sebastian Stein (eds.), Hegel’s Encyclopedia of the Philosophical Sciences: A Critical Guide. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 127-147.
    The trajectory of the “Anthropology” section of Hegel’s Encyclopedia brings us from the uncultivated, natural soul which humans share with non-human animals, to the point where it becomes an individual subject, ready to become the “I” of the “Phenomenology” section. Much of this entails the transformation of the body from something purely determined by nature to being a home for spirit as it freely relates itself to the world. The “Anthropology” thus dwells on the theme of liberation from nature. Especially (...)
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  12.  55
    It’s not easy being Green Lanterns.Jane Dryden - 2011 - The Philosophers' Magazine 53 (53):96-99.
    The hero might do something that he or she may regret later, but since the action is so boldly and decisively undertaken, we can’t help but be impressed. We may even find ourselves awed by the magnificence of an action that is ethically abhorrent.
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  13.  44
    Recent Dissertations.Jane Dryden - 2008 - The Owl of Minerva 40 (1):09.
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  14.  22
    The Empirical I in the System of Ethics.Jane Dryden - 2008 - Philosophy Today 52 (3-4):399-406.
    This paper will consider the differing ways that empirical individuality is dealt with in Fichte’s philosophy, focusing especially on the System of Ethics. It will attempt to defend Fichte against some of his critics who suggest that individuality and individual freedom are lost within the more universalist account given in the System of Ethics, by showing how Fichte has different purposes in the doctrine of right and the doctrine of ethics. However, on the other side, it will also caution against (...)
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  15.  8
    Green Lantern and Philosophy: No Evil Shall Escape This Book.William Irwin, Jane Dryden & Mark D. White (eds.) - 2011 - Wiley.
  16.  2
    Book Review: Alison Stone, Nature, Ethics and Gender in German Romanticism and Idealism[REVIEW]Jane Dryden - 2021 - Hypatia Reviews Online 2020:E13.
  17.  57
    Hegel’s Philosophy of Reality, Freedom, and God, by Robert M. Wallace. [REVIEW]Jane Dryden - 2006 - The Owl of Minerva 38 (1-2):203-208.
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  18.  56
    Rights, Bodies and Recognition. [REVIEW]Jane Dryden - 2010 - The Owl of Minerva 42 (1-2):229-237.