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James G. Snyder [10]James V. Snyder [5]James Snyder [5]James A. Snyder [2]
  1.  54
    Development of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Policy for the Care of Terminally Ill Patients Who May Become Organ Donors after Death Following the Removal of Life Support.Michael A. DeVita & James V. Snyder - 1993 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 3 (2):131-143.
    In the mid 1980s it was apparent that the need for organ donors exceeded those willing to donate. Some University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) physicians initiated discussion of possible new organ donor categories including individuals pronounced dead by traditional cardiac criteria. However, they reached no conclusion and dropped the discussion. In the late 1980s and the early 1990s, four cases arose in which dying patients or their families requested organ donation following the elective removal of mechanical ventilation. Controversy surrounding (...)
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  2.  27
    History of Organ Donation by Patients with Cardiac Death.Michael A. DeVita, James V. Snyder & Ake Grenvik - 1993 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 3 (2):113-129.
    When successful solid organ transplantation was initiated almost 40 years ago, its current success rate was not anticipated. But continuous efforts were undertaken to overcome the two major obstacles to success: injury caused by interrupting nutrient supply to the organ and rejection of the implanted organ by normal host defense mechanisms. Solutions have resulted from technologic medical advances, but also from using organs from different sources. Each potential solution has raised ethical concerns and has variably resulted in societal acclaim, censure, (...)
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  3.  28
    Procuring Organs from a Non-Heart-Beating Cadaver: A Case Report.Michael A. DeVita, Rade Vukmir, James V. Snyder & Cheryl Graziano - 1993 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 3 (4):371-385.
    Organ transplantation is an accepted therapy for major organ failure, but it depends on the availability of viable organs. Most organs transplanted in the U.S. come from either "brain-dead" or living related donors. Recently organ procurement from patients pronounced dead using cardiopulmonary criteria, so-called "non-heart-beating cadaver donors" (NHBCDs), has been reconsidered. In May 1992, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) enacted a new, complicated policy for procuring organs from NHBCDs after the elective removal of life support. Seventeen months later (...)
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  4.  41
    Reflections on Non-Heartbeating Organ Donation: How 3 Years of Experience Affected the University of Pittsburgh's Ethics Committee's Actions.Michael DeVita, James V. Snyder, Renéee C. Fox & Stuart J. Younger - 1996 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (2):285.
    In 1991, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center implemented a policy that permitted the recovery of organs from cadavers pronounced dead using standardized cardiac criteria. This policy allowed families that had made a decision to forgo life sustaining treatment to then request organ donation. This entailed taking the patient to the operating room, discontinuing therapy, and after the patient is pronounced dead, procuring organs.
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  5.  16
    Philosophy in the Renaissance: an anthology.Paul Richard Blum & James G. Snyder (eds.) - 2023 - Washington, D.C.: The Catholic University of America Press.
    The Renaissance was a period of great intellectual change and innovation as philosophers rediscovered the philosophy of classical antiquity and passed it on to the modern age. Renaissance philosophy is distinct both from the medieval scholasticism, based on revelation and authority, and from philosophers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries who transformed it into new philosophical systems. Despite the importance of the Renaissance to the development of philosophy over time, it has remained largely understudied by historians of philosophy and professional (...)
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  6.  17
    Non-Heart-Beating Organ Donation: A Reply to Campbell and Weber.Michael A. DeVita, Rade Vukmir, James V. Snyder & Cheryl Graziano - 1995 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 5 (1):43-49.
    In the preceding commentary, Campbell and Weber raise two valid and important issues concerning non-heart-beating organ donation (NHBOD). First, because the procedure links withdrawal of life support and the potential for subsequent organ donation, the desire for organs may create a situation in which care of the dying individual has relatively less importance and the dying may receive suboptimal care. Second, even if concerns about care of the dying were dealt with adequately, there will not be enough non-heart-beating donors to (...)
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  7. Ficino, Marsilio.James G. Snyder - 2011 - In James Fieser & Bradley Dowden (eds.), Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Routledge.
     
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  8.  28
    Heidegger reading Plato: On the way to the future of philosophy.James Snyder - 1997 - The European Legacy 2 (2):332-337.
  9.  30
    Is sociopathy a type or not? Will the “real” sociopathy please stand up?James Snyder - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (3):575-576.
    The validity of the classification of “primary sociopaths” as a qualitatively distinct group in the general population is questioned. Cenetic variation in the experience and expression of emotions may play a role in the development of antisocial behavior. However, research clearly documents that socialization environments powerfully modify the expression of genetic biases in a manner that increases or decreases the risk for “sociopathy.”.
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  10. Jeffrey Bloechl, ed., The Face of the Other and the Trace of God: Essays on the Philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas Reviewed by.James A. Snyder - 2001 - Philosophy in Review 21 (2):84-86.
     
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  11.  8
    Leibniz et Ficino: vie, activité, matière. Leibniz und Ficino: Leben, Aktivität, Materie.James G. Snyder & Catherine Wilson - 2017 - Studia Leibnitiana 49 (2):243.
    Although Leibniz characterised himself in the “New Essays” as a “Platonic” as opposed to a “Democritean” philosopher, his intellectual relationship with the most famous of the Renaissance Neoplatonists, Marsilio Ficino, has received little attention. Here we review what can be thus far established regarding Leibniz’s acquaintance with portions of Ficino’s Opera omnia of 1576. We compare Ficino’s disenchantment with the atomistic materialism of Lucretius, which he had favoured in his youth, and his turn to Platonism for inspiration, with Leibniz’s own (...)
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  12.  55
    Marsilio Ficino and Frane Petrić on the “Ontological Priority” of Matter and Space.James G. Snyder - 2011 - Synthesis Philosophica 26 (1):229-239.
    This paper is a comparison of some of the central ontological claims on the nature of prime matter of the Renaissance Platonist Marsilio Ficino, and the nature of space of Frane Petrić, the sixteenth century Platonist from the town of Cres. In it I argue that there are two respects in which the natural philosophies of both Platonists resemble one another, especially when it comes to the ontological status of the most basic substrate of the material world. First, both Ficino (...)
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  13.  42
    Marsilio Ficino’s Critique of the Lucretian Alternative.James G. Snyder - 2011 - Journal of the History of Ideas 72 (2):165-181.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Marsilio Ficino’s Critique of the Lucretian AlternativeJames G. SnyderIntroductionMarsilio Ficino is perhaps most widely remembered by historians of philosophy today as a fifteenth-century Platonist and Hermeticist who advocated the soul’s flight from the sordid world of matter and body. Ficino’s major contributions to philosophy include his Latin translations of Plato and Plotinus, as well as his voluminous and encyclopedic Platonic Theology, where he argues that the immortal soul occupies (...)
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  14.  17
    Marsilio Ficino et Frane Petrić à propos de la « priorité ontologique » de la matière et de l'espace.James G. Snyder - 2011 - Synthesis Philosophica 26 (1):229-239.
    Cet article est une comparaison de certaines affirmations ontologiques sur la nature de la matière première chez le platonicien de la Renaissance Marsilio Ficino et sur la nature de l’espace chez Frane Petrić, platonicien du XVIème siècle issu de la ville de Cres. J’y soutiens que les philosophies naturelles des deux platoniciens se ressemblent à deux égards, notamment en ce qui concerne le statut ontologique du substrat le plus fondamental du monde matériel. D’abord, Ficino comme Petrić soutiennent l’existence fondamentale de (...)
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  15.  20
    Marsilio Ficino i Frane Petrić o »ontološkom prioritetu« materije i prostora.James G. Snyder - 2011 - Synthesis Philosophica 26 (1):229-239.
    Ovaj članak je usporedba nekih od centralnih ontoloških stavova o naravi prve materije renesansnog platonista Marsilia Ficina te naravi prostora Frane Petrića, platonista 16. stoljeća iz grada Cresa. U njemu tvrdim da postoje dva aspekta u kojima prirodne filozofije oba platonista nalikuju jedna drugoj, naročito po pitanju ontološkog statusa najtemeljnijeg supstrata materijalnog svijeta. Kao prvo, i Ficino i Petrić se zalažu za temeljnu egzistenciju materije i prostora. Kao drugo, oba filozofa pridaju »ontološki prioritet« materiji i prostoru nad onim što se (...)
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  16.  12
    Marsilio Ficino und Frane Petrić zur „ontologischen Priorität“ von Materie und Raum.James G. Snyder - 2011 - Synthesis Philosophica 26 (1):229-239.
    Dieser Artikel ist ein Vergleich einiger der signifikanten ontologischen Behauptungen über die Natur der ersten Materie des renaissancistischen Platonikers Marsilio Ficino und über das Gepräge des Raums Frane Petrićs, eines aus der Stadt Cres stammenden Platonikers des 16. Jahrhunderts. Darin vertrete ich die Ansicht, es bestünden zwei Hinsichten, in denen die natürlichen Philosophien beider Platoniker einander ähnelten, speziell in puncto ontologischer Sachlage des grundlegendsten Substrats der materiellen Welt. Zuallererst treten sowohl Ficino wie auch Petrić für eine fundamentale Existenz der Materie (...)
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  17. Nietzsche's physiology.James A. Snyder - 1994 - International Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):83-91.
     
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  18.  49
    The Cambridge Companion to Renaissance Philosophy.James Snyder - 2009 - Vivarium 47 (1):140-142.
  19. The Meaning of the 'Maiestas domini'in Hosios David.James Snyder - 1967 - Byzantion 37:143-52.
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  20. The pregnancy of matter: Marsilio Ficino on natural change" from within" matter.James G. Snyder - 2011 - Rinascimento 51:139-155.
     
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  21. The theory of materia prima in Marsilio Ficino's platonic theology.James Snyder - 2008 - Vivarium 46 (2):192-221.
    This paper is an examination of the theory of materia prima of the fifteenth century Platonist Marsilio Ficino. It limits its discussion of Ficino's theory to the ontological and epistemic status of prime matter in his Platonic Theology. Ficino holds a "robust" theory of prime matter that makes two fundamental assertions: First, prime matter exists independent of form, and second, it is, at least in principle, intelligible. Ficino's theory of prime matter is framed in this paper with a discussion of (...)
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  22.  15
    Descartes and the Passionate Mind. [REVIEW]James G. Snyder - 2008 - Philosophical Inquiry 30 (3-4):196-198.
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