51 found
Order:
  1.  63
    An interactive activation model of context effects in letter perception: I. An account of basic findings.James L. McClelland & David E. Rumelhart - 1981 - Psychological Review 88 (5):375-407.
  2.  28
    A distributed, developmental model of word recognition and naming.Mark S. Seidenberg & James L. McClelland - 1989 - Psychological Review 96 (4):523-568.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   415 citations  
  3.  28
    Why there are complementary learning systems in the hippocampus and neocortex: Insights from the successes and failures of connectionist models of learning and memory.James L. McClelland, Bruce L. McNaughton & Randall C. O'Reilly - 1995 - Psychological Review 102 (3):419-457.
  4.  72
    An interactive activation model of context effects in letter perception: II. The contextual enhancement effect and some tests and extensions of the model.David E. Rumelhart & James L. McClelland - 1982 - Psychological Review 89 (1):60-94.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   214 citations  
  5.  19
    Understanding normal and impaired word reading: Computational principles in quasi-regular domains.David C. Plaut, James L. McClelland, Mark S. Seidenberg & Karalyn Patterson - 1996 - Psychological Review 103 (1):56-115.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   191 citations  
  6.  46
    Distributed memory and the representation of general and specific information.James L. McClelland & David E. Rumelhart - 1985 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 114 (2):159-188.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   185 citations  
  7.  40
    On the control of automatic processes: A parallel distributed processing account of the Stroop effect.Jonathan D. Cohen, Kevin Dunbar & James L. McClelland - 1990 - Psychological Review 97 (3):332-361.
  8.  44
    The time course of perceptual choice: The leaky, competing accumulator model.Marius Usher & James L. McClelland - 2001 - Psychological Review 108 (3):550-592.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   146 citations  
  9.  12
    On the time relations of mental processes: An examination of systems of processes in cascade.James L. McClelland - 1979 - Psychological Review 86 (4):287-330.
  10.  88
    Letting structure emerge: connectionist and dynamical systems approaches to cognition.James L. McClelland, Matthew M. Botvinick, David C. Noelle, David C. Plaut, Timothy T. Rogers, Mark S. Seidenberg & Linda B. Smith - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (8):348-356.
  11.  11
    Learning and applying contextual constraints in sentence comprehension.Mark F. St John & James L. McClelland - 1990 - Artificial Intelligence 46 (1-2):217-257.
  12.  16
    Putting knowledge in its place: A scheme for programming parallel processing structures on the fly.James L. McClelland - 1985 - Cognitive Science 9 (1):113-146.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   56 citations  
  13.  18
    Generalization through the recurrent interaction of episodic memories: A model of the hippocampal system.Dharshan Kumaran & James L. McClelland - 2012 - Psychological Review 119 (3):573-616.
  14.  26
    Structure and Deterioration of Semantic Memory: A Neuropsychological and Computational Investigation.Timothy T. Rogers, Matthew A. Lambon Ralph, Peter Garrard, Sasha Bozeat, James L. McClelland, John R. Hodges & Karalyn Patterson - 2004 - Psychological Review 111 (1):205-235.
  15.  48
    Interactive Activation and Mutual Constraint Satisfaction in Perception and Cognition.James L. McClelland, Daniel Mirman, Donald J. Bolger & Pranav Khaitan - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (6):1139-1189.
    In a seminal 1977 article, Rumelhart argued that perception required the simultaneous use of multiple sources of information, allowing perceivers to optimally interpret sensory information at many levels of representation in real time as information arrives. Building on Rumelhart's arguments, we present the Interactive Activation hypothesis—the idea that the mechanism used in perception and comprehension to achieve these feats exploits an interactive activation process implemented through the bidirectional propagation of activation among simple processing units. We then examine the interactive activation (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  16.  46
    Parallel Distributed Processing at 25: Further Explorations in the Microstructure of Cognition.Timothy T. Rogers & James L. McClelland - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (6):1024-1077.
    This paper introduces a special issue of Cognitive Science initiated on the 25th anniversary of the publication of Parallel Distributed Processing (PDP), a two-volume work that introduced the use of neural network models as vehicles for understanding cognition. The collection surveys the core commitments of the PDP framework, the key issues the framework has addressed, and the debates the framework has spawned, and presents viewpoints on the current status of these issues. The articles focus on both historical roots and contemporary (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  17.  10
    Loss Aversion and Inhibition in Dynamical Models of Multialternative Choice.Marius Usher & James L. McClelland - 2004 - Psychological Review 111 (3):757-769.
  18.  22
    Rethinking infant knowledge: Toward an adaptive process account of successes and failures in object permanence tasks.Yuko Munakata, James L. McClelland, Mark H. Johnson & Robert S. Siegler - 1997 - Psychological Review 104 (4):686-713.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  19. The Place of Modeling in Cognitive Science.James L. McClelland - 2009 - Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (1):11-38.
    I consider the role of cognitive modeling in cognitive science. Modeling, and the computers that enable it, are central to the field, but the role of modeling is often misunderstood. Models are not intended to capture fully the processes they attempt to elucidate. Rather, they are explorations of ideas about the nature of cognitive processes. In these explorations, simplification is essential—through simplification, the implications of the central ideas become more transparent. This is not to say that simplification has no downsides; (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  20.  50
    Are there interactive processes in speech perception?James L. McClelland, Daniel Mirman & Lori L. Holt - 2006 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (8):363-369.
  21.  14
    Familiarity breeds differentiation: A subjective-likelihood approach to the effects of experience in recognition memory.James L. McClelland & Mark Chappell - 1998 - Psychological Review 105 (4):724-760.
  22. Précis of semantic cognition: A parallel distributed processing approach.Timothy T. Rogers & James L. McClelland - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (6):689-714.
    In this prcis we focus on phenomena central to the reaction against similarity-based theories that arose in the 1980s and that subsequently motivated the approach to semantic knowledge. Specifically, we consider (1) how concepts differentiate in early development, (2) why some groupings of items seem to form or coherent categories while others do not, (3) why different properties seem central or important to different concepts, (4) why children and adults sometimes attest to beliefs that seem to contradict their direct experience, (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  23.  21
    Concepts, control, and context: A connectionist account of normal and disordered semantic cognition.Paul Hoffman, James L. McClelland & Matthew A. Lambon Ralph - 2018 - Psychological Review 125 (3):293-328.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  24. Emergence in Cognitive Science.James L. McClelland - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (4):751-770.
    The study of human intelligence was once dominated by symbolic approaches, but over the last 30 years an alternative approach has arisen. Symbols and processes that operate on them are often seen today as approximate characterizations of the emergent consequences of sub- or nonsymbolic processes, and a wide range of constructs in cognitive science can be understood as emergents. These include representational constructs (units, structures, rules), architectural constructs (central executive, declarative memory), and developmental processes and outcomes (stages, sensitive periods, neurocognitive (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  25.  11
    The Morton-Massaro law of information integration: Implications for models of perception.Javier R. Movellan & James L. McClelland - 2001 - Psychological Review 108 (1):113-148.
  26.  19
    Locating object knowledge in the brain: Comment on Bowers’s (2009) attempt to revive the grandmother cell hypothesis.David C. Plaut & James L. McClelland - 2010 - Psychological Review 117 (1):284-288.
  27.  28
    A connectionist model of a continuous developmental transition in the balance scale task.Anna C. Schapiro & James L. McClelland - 2009 - Cognition 110 (3):395-411.
  28. Connectionist models of cognition.Michael Sc Thomas & James L. McClelland - 2008 - In Ron Sun (ed.), The Cambridge Handbook of Computational Psychology. Cambridge University Press.
  29.  32
    Learning Continuous Probability Distributions with Symmetric Diffusion Networks.Javier R. Movellan & James L. McClelland - 1993 - Cognitive Science 17 (4):463-496.
    In this article we present symmetric diffusion networks, a family of networks that instantiate the principles of continuous, stochastic, adaptive and interactive propagation of information. Using methods of Markovion diffusion theory, we formalize the activation dynamics of these networks and then show that they can be trained to reproduce entire multivariate probability distributions on their outputs using the contrastive Hebbion learning rule (CHL). We show that CHL performs gradient descent on an error function that captures differences between desired and obtained (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  30.  12
    More words but still no lexicon: Reply to Besner et al. (1990).Mark S. Seidenberg & James L. McClelland - 1990 - Psychological Review 97 (3):447-452.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  31.  27
    Effects of Attention on the Strength of Lexical Influences on Speech Perception: Behavioral Experiments and Computational Mechanisms.Daniel Mirman, James L. McClelland, Lori L. Holt & James S. Magnuson - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (2):398-417.
    The effects of lexical context on phonological processing are pervasive and there have been indications that such effects may be modulated by attention. However, attentional modulation in speech processing is neither well documented nor well understood. Experiment 1 demonstrated attentional modulation of lexical facilitation of speech sound recognition when task and critical stimuli were identical across attention conditions. We propose modulation of lexical activation as a neurophysiologically plausible computational mechanism that can account for this type of modulation. Contrary to the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  32.  31
    Stipulating versus discovering representations.David C. Plaut & James L. McClelland - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):489-491.
    Page's proposal to stipulate representations in which individual units correspond to meaningful entities is too unconstrained to support effective theorizing. An approach combining general computational principles with domain-specific assumptions, in which learning is used to discover representations that are effective in solving tasks, provides more insight into why cognitive and neural systems are organized the way they are.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  33.  38
    A simple model from a powerful framework that spans levels of analysis.Timothy T. Rogers & James L. McClelland - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (6):729-749.
    The commentaries reflect three core themes that pertain not just to our theory, but to the enterprise of connectionist modeling more generally. The first concerns the relationship between a cognitive theory and an implemented computer model. Specifically, how does one determine, when a model departs from the theory it exemplifies, whether the departure is a useful simplification or a critical flaw? We argue that the answer to this question depends partially upon the model's intended function, and we suggest that connectionist (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  34.  15
    Value-based decision making: An interactive activation perspective.Gaurav Suri, James J. Gross & James L. McClelland - 2020 - Psychological Review 127 (2):153-185.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35. Connectionist models.James L. McClelland & Axel Cleeremans - 2009 - In Bayne Tim, Cleeremans Axel & Wilken Patrick (eds.), The Oxford Companion to Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
  36.  25
    The neurodynamics of choice, value-based decisions, and preference reversal.Marius Usher, Anat Elhalal & James L. McClelland - 2008 - In Nick Chater & Mike Oaksford (eds.), The Probabilistic Mind: Prospects for Bayesian Cognitive Science. Oxford University Press. pp. 277--300.
  37. When should we expect indirect effects in human contingency learning.D. Sternberg & James L. McClelland - 2009 - In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. pp. 206--211.
  38.  80
    Developing a domain-general framework for cognition: What is the best approach?James L. McClelland, David C. Plaut, Stephen J. Gotts & Tiago V. Maia - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (5):611-614.
    We share with Anderson & Lebiere (A&L) (and with Newell before them) the goal of developing a domain-general framework for modeling cognition, and we take seriously the issue of evaluation criteria. We advocate a more focused approach than the one reflected in Newell's criteria, based on analysis of failures as well as successes of models brought into close contact with experimental data. A&L attribute the shortcomings of our parallel-distributed processing framework to a failure to acknowledge a symbolic level of thought. (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39. The GRAIN model: A framework for modeling the dynamics of information processing.James L. McClelland - 1993 - In David E. Meyer & Sylvan Kornblum (eds.), Attention and Performance Xiv. MIT Press. pp. 655--688.
  40.  78
    A neurocomputational approach to obsessive-compulsive disorder.Tiago V. Maia & James L. McClelland - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (1):14-15.
  41.  13
    A PDP approach to set size effects within the Stroop task: Reply to Kanne, Balota, Spieler, and Faust (1998).Jonathan D. Cohen, Marius Usher & James L. McClelland - 1998 - Psychological Review 105 (1):188-194.
  42.  32
    Building on prior knowledge without building it in.Steven S. Hansen, Andrew K. Lampinen, Gaurav Suri & James L. McClelland - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. The somatic marker hypothesis: still many questions but no answers: Response to Bechara et al.Tiago V. Maia & James L. McClelland - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (4):162-164.
  44.  16
    Double dissociations never license simple inferences about underlying brain organization, especially in developmental cases.James L. McClelland & Gary Lupyan - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):763-764.
    Different developmental anomalies produce contrasting deficits in a single, integrated system. In a network that inflects regular and exception verbs correctly, a disproportionate deficit with exceptions occurs if connections are deleted, whereas a disproportionate deficit with regulars occurs when an auditory deficit impairs perception of the regular inflection. In general, contrasting deficits do not license the inference of underlying modularity.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  10
    The Basis of Organization in Interactive Processing Systems.James L. McClelland - 1996 - In Garrison W. Cottrell (ed.), Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 18--41.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  14
    Una aproximación conexionista a los procesos mentales. Entrevista con James L. McClelland.Belén Pascual & James L. McClelland - 2005 - Anuario Filosófico 38 (3):841-855.
    In this interview, James L. McClelland responds to questions regarding connectionist models of cognition, a theory inspired by information processing in the brain. McClelland explains the distinction between symbolic and non-symbolic processing for a better understanding of mental processes. He argues that connectionist models can perform the computations which we know the brain can perform. In addition, he responds to several general questions on the perspectives of computational models of cognition.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  24
    Postscript: Parallel distributed processing in localist models without thresholds.David C. Plaut & James L. McClelland - 2010 - Psychological Review 117 (1):289-290.
  48.  13
    Plenary Addresses.David E. Rumelhart, James L. McClelland & Adele Diamond - 1996 - In Garrison W. Cottrell (ed.), Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 18--1.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  53
    How do we get from propositions to behavior?Daniel A. Sternberg & James L. McClelland - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):226-227.
    Mitchell et al. describe many fascinating studies, and in the process, propose what they consider to be a unified framework for human learning in which effortful, controlled learning results in propositional knowledge. However, it is unclear how any of their findings privilege a propositional account, and we remain concerned that embedding all knowledge in propositional representations obscures the tight interdependence between learning from experiences and the use of the results of learning as a basis for action.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. When a bad metaphor may not be a victimless crime: the role of metaphor in social policy.P. H. Thibodeau, James L. McClelland & Lera Boroditsky - 2009 - In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. pp. 809--814.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 51