Results for 'James L. Hyland'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Democratic Theory: The Philosophical Foundations. By James L. Hyland.A. Edwards - 1998 - The European Legacy 3:152-152.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. George G. Brenkert, "Political Freedom".James L. Hyland - 1994 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 2 (1):173.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  29
    Books Briefly Noted.James L. Hyland, Teresa Iglesias, Peter J. King, Ciaran McGlynn, Jaime Nubiola, Brian O'Connor, Patrick Gorevan, Rachel Vaughan & Máire O'Neill - 1994 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 2 (1):173-179.
    Political Freedom By George G. Brenkert Routledge, 1991. Pp. 278. ISBN 0?415?03372?1. £35 hbk. Wittgenstein: A Bibliographical Guide By Guido Frongia and Brian McGuinness Basil Blackwell, 1990. Pp. x + 438. ISBN 00631?13765?3. £60.00. Metaphysics By Peter van Inwagen Oxford University Press, 1993. Pp. xiii + 222. ISBN 0?19?8751400. £11.95 pbk. The Nature of Moral Thinking By Francis Snare Routledge, 1992. Pp. 187. ISBN 0?415?04709?9. £9.99 pbk. Filosofía analitica hoy: Encuentro de tradiciones Edited by Mercedes Torrevejano Servicio de Publications Universidade (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  22
    A Second Chance.Nancy P. Blumenthal, James D. Mendez, Martin L. Smith & Beth Hyland - 2013 - Hastings Center Report 43 (1):12-13.
  5.  37
    An Interactive Activation Model of Context Effects in Letter Perception: I. An Account of Basic Findings.James L. McClelland & David E. Rumelhart - 1981 - Psychological Review 88 (5):375-407.
  6. Nietzsche's Zarathustra Notes of the Seminar Given in 1934-1939 by C.G. Jung ; Edited by James L. Jarrett.C. G. Jung & James L. Jarrett - 1989
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  19
    Why There Are Complementary Learning Systems in the Hippocampus and Neocortex: Insights From the Successes and Failures of Connectionist Models of Learning and Memory.James L. McClelland, Bruce L. McNaughton & Randall C. O'Reilly - 1995 - Psychological Review 102 (3):419-457.
  8.  36
    Distributed Memory and the Representation of General and Specific Information.James L. McClelland & David E. Rumelhart - 1985 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 114 (2):159-188.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   181 citations  
  9.  65
    Letting Structure Emerge: Connectionist and Dynamical Systems Approaches to Cognition.James L. McClelland, Matthew M. Botvinick, David C. Noelle, David C. Plaut, Timothy T. Rogers, Mark S. Seidenberg & Linda B. Smith - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (8):348-356.
  10.  5
    On the Time Relations of Mental Processes: An Examination of Systems of Processes in Cascade.James L. McClelland - 1979 - Psychological Review 86 (4):287-330.
  11.  74
    Subjectivization in Ethics.James L. Hudson - 1989 - American Philosophical Quarterly 26 (3):221 - 229.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  12.  37
    Letting Structure Emerge: Connectionist and Dynamical Systems Approaches to Cognition.Linda B. Smith James L. McClelland, Matthew M. Botvinick, David C. Noelle, David C. Plaut, Timothy T. Rogers, Mark S. Seidenberg - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (8):348.
  13.  42
    A Defense of the Whole‐Brain Concept of Death.James L. Bernat - 1998 - Hastings Center Report 28 (2):14-23.
  14.  24
    Is There an Archê Kakou in Plato?James L. Wood - 2009 - Review of Metaphysics 63 (2):349-384.
  15.  45
    The Educational Writings of John Locke.James L. Axtell & John Locke - 1969 - British Journal of Educational Studies 17 (1):97-98.
  16.  13
    James' Defense of a Believing Attitude in Religion.James L. Muyskens - 1974 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 10 (1):44 - 54.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  20
    James Fredericks Interview.James L. Fredericks - 2002 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 22 (1):251-254.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  38
    Whither Brain Death?James L. Bernat - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (8):3-8.
    The publicity surrounding the recent McMath and Muñoz cases has rekindled public interest in brain death: the familiar term for human death determination by showing the irreversible cessation of clinical brain functions. The concept of brain death was developed decades ago to permit withdrawal of therapy in hopeless cases and to permit organ donation. It has become widely established medical practice, and laws permit it in all U.S. jurisdictions. Brain death has a biophilosophical justification as a standard for determining human (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  19.  55
    Rules or Connections in Past-Tense Inflections: What Does the Evidence Rule Out?James L. McClelland & Karalyn Patterson - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (11):465-472.
  20.  11
    The Whole-Brain Concept of Death Remains Optimum Public Policy.James L. Bernat - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (1):35-43.
    The definition of death is one of the oldest and most enduring problems in biophilosophy and bioethics. Serious controversies over formally defining death began with the invention of the positive-pressure mechanical ventilator in the 1950s. For the first time, physicians could maintain ventilation and, hence, circulation on patients who had sustained what had been previously lethal brain damage. Prior to the development of mechanical ventilators, brain injuries severe enough to induce apnea quickly progressed to cardiac arrest from hypoxemia. Before the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations  
  21. The Place of Modeling in Cognitive Science.James L. McClelland - 2009 - Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (1):11-38.
  22.  24
    Timing Volition: Questions of What and When About W.James L. Ringo - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):550-551.
  23.  32
    Medical Decision Making by Patients in the Locked-in Syndrome.James L. Bernat - 2020 - Neuroethics 13 (2):229-238.
    The locked-in syndrome is a state of profound paralysis with preserved awareness of self and environment who typically results from a brain stem stroke. Although patients in LIS have great difficulty communicating, their consciousness, cognition, and language usually remain intact. Medical decision-making by LIS patients is compromised, not by cognitive impairment, but by severe communication impairment. Former systems of communication that permitted LIS patients to make only “yes” or “no” responses to questions was sufficient to validate their consent for simple (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  24.  8
    Putting Knowledge in its Place: A Scheme for Programming Parallel Processing Structures on the Fly.James L. McClelland - 1985 - Cognitive Science 9 (1):113-146.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   56 citations  
  25.  14
    A Distributed, Developmental Model of Word Recognition and Naming.Mark S. Seidenberg & James L. McClelland - 1989 - Psychological Review 96 (4):523-568.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   401 citations  
  26.  94
    The Whole-Brain Concept of Death Remains Optimum Public Policy.James L. Bernat - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (1):35-43.
    “Brain death,” the determination of human death by showing the irreversible loss of all clinical functions of the brain, has become a worldwide practice. A biophilosophical account of brain death requires four sequential tasks: agreeing on the paradigm of death, a set of preconditions that frame the discussion; determining the definition of death by making explicit the consensual concept of death; determining the criterion of death that proves the definition has been fulfilled by being both necessary and sufficient for death; (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  27. Quantum Theoretical Concepts of Measurement: Part I.James L. Park - 1968 - Philosophy of Science 35 (3):205-231.
    The overall purpose of this paper is to clarify the physical meaning and epistemological status of the term 'measurement' as used in quantum theory. After a review of the essential logical structure of quantum physics, Part I presents interpretive discussions contrasting the quantal concepts observable and ensemble with their classical ancestors along the lines of Margenau's latency theory. Against this background various popular ideas concerning the nature of quantum measurement are critically surveyed. The analysis reveals that, in addition to internal (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  28.  36
    Interactive Activation and Mutual Constraint Satisfaction in Perception and Cognition.James L. McClelland, Daniel Mirman, Donald J. Bolger & Pranav Khaitan - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (6):1139-1189.
    In a seminal 1977 article, Rumelhart argued that perception required the simultaneous use of multiple sources of information, allowing perceivers to optimally interpret sensory information at many levels of representation in real time as information arrives. Building on Rumelhart's arguments, we present the Interactive Activation hypothesis—the idea that the mechanism used in perception and comprehension to achieve these feats exploits an interactive activation process implemented through the bidirectional propagation of activation among simple processing units. We then examine the interactive activation (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  29.  19
    On Noncongruence Between the Concept and Determination of Death.James L. Bernat - 2013 - Hastings Center Report 43 (6):25-33.
  30.  5
    Aligning the Criterion and Tests for Brain Death.James L. Bernat & Anne L. Dalle Ave - 2019 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 28 (4):635-641.
    :Disturbing cases continue to be published of patients declared brain dead who later were found to have a few intact brain functions. We address the reasons for the mismatch between the whole-brain criterion and brain death tests, and suggest solutions. Many of the cases result from diagnostic errors in brain death determination. Others probably result from a tiny amount of residual blood flow to the brain despite intracranial circulatory arrest. Strategies to lessen the mismatch include improving brain death determination training (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  31.  44
    Are There Interactive Processes in Speech Perception?James L. McClelland, Daniel Mirman & Lori L. Holt - 2006 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (8):363-369.
  32. The Biophilosophical Basis of Whole-Brain Death.James L. Bernat - 2002 - Soc Philos Policy 19 (2):324-42.
    Notwithstanding these wise pronouncements, my project here is to characterize the biological phenomenon of death of the higher animal species, such as vertebrates. My claim is that the formulation of “whole- brain death ” provides the most congruent map for our correct understanding of the concept of death. This essay builds upon the foundation my colleagues and I have laid since 1981 to characterize the concept of death and refine when this event occurs. Although our society's well-accepted program of multiple (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  33. Emergence in Cognitive Science.James L. McClelland - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (4):751-770.
    The study of human intelligence was once dominated by symbolic approaches, but over the last 30 years an alternative approach has arisen. Symbols and processes that operate on them are often seen today as approximate characterizations of the emergent consequences of sub- or nonsymbolic processes, and a wide range of constructs in cognitive science can be understood as emergents. These include representational constructs (units, structures, rules), architectural constructs (central executive, declarative memory), and developmental processes and outcomes (stages, sensitive periods, neurocognitive (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  34.  7
    Case Study. A Second Chance. Commentary.M. L. Smith & B. Hyland - 2013 - Hastings Center Report 43 (1):13-13.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  2
    Computational Approaches to Color Constancy: Adaptive and Ontogenetic Considerations.James L. Dannemiller - 1989 - Psychological Review 96 (2):255-266.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  36.  66
    Chronic Disorders of Consciousness.James L. Bernat - 2006 - Lancet 367 (9517):1181-1192.
  37.  13
    Incorporating Rapid Neocortical Learning of New Schema-Consistent Information Into Complementary Learning Systems Theory.James L. McClelland - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (4):1190-1210.
  38.  10
    A Conceptual Justification for Brain Death.James L. Bernat - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S4):S19-S21.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  39.  40
    The Sufficiency of Hope: The Conceptual Foundations of Religion.James L. Muyskens - 1979 - Temple University Press.
  40. Covariance, Invariance, and Equivalence: A Viewpoint.James L. Anderson - 1971 - General Relativity and Gravitation 2:161--72.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  41.  51
    An Interactive Activation Model of Context Effects in Letter Perception: II. The Contextual Enhancement Effect and Some Tests and Extensions of the Model.David E. Rumelhart & James L. McClelland - 1982 - Psychological Review 89 (1):60-94.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   206 citations  
  42.  13
    The Analysis of Mind.James L. Mursell - 1922 - Journal of Philosophy 19 (6):163-166.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  43.  29
    Are Organ Donors After Cardiac Death Really Dead?James L. Bernat - 2006 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 17 (2):122.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  44.  75
    Expressivism and Cognitive Propositions.James L. D. Brown - 2019 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 5 (3):371-387.
    Expressivists about normative thought and discourse traditionally deny that there are nondeflationary normative propositions. However, it has recently been suggested that expressivists might avoid a number of problems by providing a theory of normative propositions compatible with expressivism. This paper explores the prospects for developing an expressivist theory of propositions within the framework of cognitive act theories of propositions. First, I argue that the only extant expressivist theory of cognitive propositions—Michael Ridge's ‘ecumenical expressivist’ theory—fails to explain identity conditions for normative (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  45.  33
    How Much of the Brain Must Die in Brain Death?James L. Bernat - 1992 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 3 (1):21.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  46.  30
    The Time Course of Perceptual Choice: The Leaky, Competing Accumulator Model.Marius Usher & James L. McClelland - 2001 - Psychological Review 108 (3):550-592.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   132 citations  
  47.  63
    The Diminishing Marginal Value of Happy People.James L. Hudson - 1987 - Philosophical Studies 51 (1):123 - 137.
    Thomas Hurka has recently proposed a utilitarian theory which would effect a compromise between Average and Total utilitarianism, the better to deal with issues in population ethics. This Compromise theory would incorporate the principle that the value which an extra happy person contributes to a possible world is a decreasing function of the total population of that world: that happy people are of diminishing marginal value. In spite of its initial plausibility I argue against this principle. I show that the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  48.  13
    The Biophilosophical Basis of Whole-Brain Death.James L. Bernat - 2002 - Social Philosophy and Policy 19 (2):324-342.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  49. Animal Artifacts.James L. Gould - 2007 - In Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (eds.), Creations of the Mind: Theories of Artifacts and Their Representaion. Oxford University Press. pp. 249--266.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  50.  5
    The Philosophical Justification for the Equant in Ptolemy’s Almagest.James L. Zainaldin - 2017 - Phronesis 62 (4):417-442.
1 — 50 / 1000