10 found
Order:
  1. The aesthetics of coming to know someone.James H. P. Lewis - 2023 - Philosophical Studies (5-6):1-16.
    This paper is about the similarity between the appreciation of a piece of art, such as a cherished music album, and the loving appreciation of a person whom one knows well. In philosophical discussion about the rationality of love, the Qualities View (QV) says that love can be justified by reference to the qualities of the beloved. I argue that the oft-rehearsed trading-up objection fails to undermine the QV. The problems typically identified by the objection arise from the idea that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2. Relationality without obligation.James H. P. Lewis - 2022 - Analysis 82 (2):238-246.
    Some reasons are thought to depend on relations between people, such as that of a promiser to a promisee. It has sometimes been assumed that all reasons that are relational in this way are moral obligations. I argue, via a counter example, that there are non-obligatory relational reasons. If true, this has ramifications for relational theories of morality.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  3. The discretionary normativity of requests.James H. P. Lewis - 2018 - Philosophers' Imprint 18:1-16.
    Being able to ask others to do things, and thereby giving them reasons to do those things, is a prominent feature of our interpersonal lives. In this paper, I discuss the distinctive normative status of requests – what makes them different from commands and demands. I argue for a theory of this normative phenomenon which explains the sense in which the reasons presented in requests are a matter of discretion. This discretionary quality, I argue, is something that other theories cannot (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  4. Varieties of Second-Personal Reason.James H. P. Lewis - forthcoming - Erkenntnis:1-21.
    A lineage of prominent philosophers who have discussed the second-person relation can be regarded as advancing structural accounts. They posit that the second-person relation effects one transformative change to the structure of practical reasoning. In this paper, I criticise this orthodoxy and offer an alternative, substantive account. That is, I argue that entering into second-personal relations with others does indeed affect one's practical reasoning, but it does this not by altering the structure of one's agential thought, but by changing what (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. The Musicality of Speech.James H. P. Lewis - 2022 - Philosophers' Imprint 22.
    It is common for people to be sensitive to aesthetic qualities in one another’s speech. We allow the loveliness or unloveliness of a person’s voice to make impressions on us. What is more, it is also common to allow those aesthetic impressions to affect how we are inclined to feel about the speaker. We form attitudes of liking, trusting, disliking or distrusting partly in virtue of the aesthetic qualities of a person’s speech. In this paper I ask whether such attitudes (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. Levinas and 'Finite Freedom'.James H. P. Lewis & Simon Thornton - 2023 - In Joe Saunders (ed.), Freedom After Kant: From German Idealism to Ethics and the Self. Blackwell's.
    The ethical philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas is typically associated with a punishing conception of responsibility rather than freedom. In this chapter, our aim is to explore Levinas’s often overlooked theory of freedom. Specifically, we compare Levinas’s account of freedom to the Kantian (and Fichtean) idea of freedom as autonomy and the Hegelian idea of freedom as relational. Based on these comparisons, we suggest that Levinas offers a distinctive conception of freedom—“finite freedom.” In contrast to Kantian autonomy, finite freedom constitutively involves (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Commanding, Giving, Vulnerable: What is the Normative Standing of the Other in Levinas.James H. P. Lewis & Robert Stern - 2019 - In Michael Fagenblat & Melis Erdur (eds.), Levinas and Analytic Philosophy: Second-Person Normativity and the Moral Life. London: Routledge.
    At the heart of Levinas’s work is the apparently simple idea that through the encounter with another person, we are forced to give up our self-concern and take heed of the ethical relation between us. But, while simple on the surface, when one tries to characterize it in more detail, it can be hard to fit together the various ways in which Levinas talks about this relation and to identify precisely what he took its normative structure to be, as this (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  42
    The practical significance of the second-person relation.James H. P. Lewis - 2019 - Dissertation, University of Sheffield
    Second-person relations are relations between individuals knowingly engaged in interaction with one another. These are the social contexts within which it is appropriate for one to think of and address another as ‘you’. This dissertation explores the practical consequences for agents of relating to others in this fashion. A critical analysis is offered of Stephen Darwall’s theory of moral obligations in terms of demands that can be addressed from the perspective of a second-person. On the basis of the criticisms raised, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Questions about sex with socialist answers. [REVIEW]James H. P. Lewis - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (7):1102-1105.
    Amidst the lively and often highly positive reception of this best-selling collection of six essays in feminist philosophy, some critics have complained that it does not seem to argue for very much...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  57
    R. Jay Wallace The Moral Nexus. Princeton University Press, 2019. ISBN 9780691172170. 329 pp. £34.00. [REVIEW]James H. P. Lewis - 2019 - European Journal of Philosophy 27 (4):1093-1096.
    European Journal of Philosophy, EarlyView.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark