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  1.  12
    On the Medieval and the Modern: Reading Nicholas of Cusa.James G. Mellon - 2020 - The European Legacy 25 (4):421-437.
    In addressing not only the Conciliarist controversy of his day but issues of civil and ecclesiastical government and challenges to the Church, from reform movements to the division between Catholic...
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  2.  6
    Romanticism, Skepticism, Liberalism: Reading Isaiah Berlin.James G. Mellon - 2022 - The European Legacy 28 (2):139-154.
    The aim of this article is neither to challenge nor to defend Isaiah Berlin’s thought but rather to identify the main influences on his concept of liberalism. Berlin’s justification for liberalism is distinctive in that it reflects influences of Romanticism and Augustinianism. Unlike some liberals, his liberalism does not reflect unambiguous confidence in the products of the Enlightenment. Berlin valued the freedom of expression and identity, yet he feared that these freedoms faced potential threats from both left and right. These (...)
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  3.  32
    Visions of the Livable City: Reflections on the Jacobs–Mumford Debate.James G. Mellon - 2009 - Ethics, Place and Environment 12 (1):35-48.
    Since moving to Canada in 1969, Jane Jacobs, who recently passed away, has inspired and continues to inspire debate within Canada, as well as elsewhere, on the potential for and promise of the urban experience. Jacobs was not only a critic of unrestricted growth and the destruction of neighborhoods but, frequently, of the efforts of urban planners. The exchanges between Jacobs, author of The Death and Life of Great American Cities (1961), and the American planner and cultural critic Lewis Mumford, (...)
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