Results for 'James Burrell Dixon'

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  1.  32
    The Dynamics of Lexical Competition During Spoken Word Recognition.James S. Magnuson, James A. Dixon, Michael K. Tanenhaus & Richard N. Aslin - 2007 - Cognitive Science 31 (1):133-156.
    The sounds that make up spoken words are heard in a series and must be mapped rapidly onto words in memory because their elements, unlike those of visual words, cannot simultaneously exist or persist in time. Although theories agree that the dynamics of spoken word recognition are important, they differ in how they treat the nature of the competitor set—precisely which words are activated as an auditory word form unfolds in real time. This study used eye tracking to measure the (...)
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  2.  30
    The Dynamics of Lexical Competition During Spoken Word Recognition.James S. Magnuson, James A. Dixon, Michael K. Tanenhaus & Richard N. Aslin - 2007 - Cognitive Science 31 (1):133-156.
    The sounds that make up spoken words are heard in a series and must be mapped rapidly onto words in memory because their elements, unlike those of visual words, cannot simultaneously exist or persist in time. Although theories agree that the dynamics of spoken word recognition are important, they differ in how they treat the nature of the competitor set—precisely which words are activated as an auditory word form unfolds in real time. This study used eye tracking to measure the (...)
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  3.  32
    The Dynamics of Lexical Competition During Spoken Word Recognition.James S. Magnuson, James A. Dixon, Michael K. Tanenhaus & Richard N. Aslin - 2007 - Cognitive Science 31 (1):133-156.
    The sounds that make up spoken words are heard in a series and must be mapped rapidly onto words in memory because their elements, unlike those of visual words, cannot simultaneously exist or persist in time. Although theories agree that the dynamics of spoken word recognition are important, they differ in how they treat the nature of the competitor set—precisely which words are activated as an auditory word form unfolds in real time. This study used eye tracking to measure the (...)
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  4.  14
    The Dynamics of Lexical Competition During Spoken Word Recognition.James S. Magnuson, James A. Dixon, Michael K. Tanenhaus & Richard N. Aslin - 2007 - Cognitive Science: A Multidisciplinary Journal 30 (1):133-156.
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  5. Multifractal Dynamics in the Emergence of Cognitive Structure.James A. Dixon, John G. Holden, Daniel Mirman & Damian G. Stephen - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (1):51-62.
    The complex-systems approach to cognitive science seeks to move beyond the formalism of information exchange and to situate cognition within the broader formalism of energy flow. Changes in cognitive performance exhibit a fractal (i.e., power-law) relationship between size and time scale. These fractal fluctuations reflect the flow of energy at all scales governing cognition. Information transfer, as traditionally understood in the cognitive sciences, may be a subset of this multiscale energy flow. The cognitive system exhibits not just a single power-law (...)
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  6.  22
    On the spontaneous discovery of a mathematical relation during problem solving.James A. Dixon & Ashley S. Bangert - 2004 - Cognitive Science 28 (3):433-449.
    People spontaneously discover new representations during problem solving. Discovery of a mathematical representation is of special interest, because it shows that the underlying structure of the problem has been extracted. In the current study, participants solved gear‐system problems as part of a game. Although none of the participants initially used a mathematical representation, many discovered a parity‐based, mathematical strategy during problem solving. Two accounts of the spontaneous discovery of mathematical strategies were tested. According to the automatic schema abstraction hypothesis, experience (...)
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  7. Wells versus Kipling.James Main Dixon - 1921 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 2 (2):97.
  8. The philosophy of sympathy.James Main Dixon - 1922 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 3 (3):183.
     
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  9.  20
    The link between statistical segmentation and word learning in adults.Daniel Mirman, James S. Magnuson, Katharine Graf Estes & James A. Dixon - 2008 - Cognition 108 (1):271-280.
  10.  10
    Thomas Jefferson and Philosophy: Essays on the Philosophical Cast of Jefferson's Writings.James J. Carpenter, Garrett Ward Sheldon, Richard E. Dixon, Paul B. Thompson, Derek H. Davis, William Merkel, Richard Guy Wilson & M. Andrew Holowchak (eds.) - 2013 - Lexington Books.
    Thomas Jefferson and Philosophy: Essays on the Philosophical Cast of Jefferson’s Writings is a collection of essays on topics that relate to philosophical aspects of Jefferson’s thinking over the years. Much historical insight is given to ground the various philosophical strands in Jefferson’s thought and writing on topics such as political philosophy, moral philosophy, slavery, republicanism, wall of separation, liberty, educational philosophy, and architecture.
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  11.  13
    Concept formation and emergence of contradictory relations.James Cannon Dixon - 1949 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 39 (2):144.
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  12. The song divine.James Main Dixon - 1921 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 2 (4):243.
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  13. The universities and leadership.James Main Dixon - 1920 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 1 (2):29.
     
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  14. Aesthetics and religion.James Main Dixon - 1923 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 4 (3):187.
     
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  15. The common thread in French and English culture.James Main Dixon - 1920 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 1 (1):44.
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  16. The ideals of William Dean Howells.James Main Dixon - 1921 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 2 (1):35.
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  17.  19
    Intrafamilial Phenotypic Variability in the C9orf72 Gene Expansion: 2 Case Studies.David Foxe, Elle Elan, James R. Burrell, Felicity V. C. Leslie, Emma Devenney, John B. Kwok, Glenda M. Halliday, John R. Hodges & Olivier Piguet - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  18.  24
    Entrainment and Modulation of Gesture–Speech Synchrony Under Delayed Auditory Feedback.Wim Pouw & James A. Dixon - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (3):e12721.
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  19.  48
    From Passions to Emotions: The Creation of a Secular Psychological Category.Thomas Dixon - 2003 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Today there is a thriving 'emotions industry' to which philosophers, psychologists and neuroscientists are contributing. Yet until two centuries ago 'the emotions' did not exist. In this path-breaking study Thomas Dixon shows how, during the nineteenth century, the emotions came into being as a distinct psychological category, replacing existing categories such as appetites, passions, sentiments and affections. By examining medieval and eighteenth-century theological psychologies and placing Charles Darwin and William James within a broader and more complex nineteenth-century setting, (...)
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  20.  28
    Effect of Representational Distance Between Meanings on Recognition of Ambiguous Spoken Words.Daniel Mirman, Ted J. Strauss, James A. Dixon & James S. Magnuson - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (1):161-173.
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  21.  13
    Islam: Essays on Scripture, Thought and Society: A Festschrift in Honour of Anthony H. Johns.R. Israeli, Jutta Bluhm-Warn, David Burrell, Mike Carter, James Fox, Richard Frank, Anthony Johns, Clive Kessler, Nehemia Levtzion, Saumitra Mukherjee, Ian Proudfoot, Tony Reid, Merle Calvin Ricklefs & Peter Riddell (eds.) - 1997 - Brill.
    This volume contains 17 articles on various aspects of Islamic thought in the Middle East and in Southeast Asia. The first 9 articles concentrate especially on the Qur’ān and its exegesis, Kalām and Sufism; the second 8 articles deal with Javanese Islam, and with Islam and modernity in Southeast Asia.
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  22. Darwinism and Human Dignity.Ben Dixon - 2007 - Environmental Values 16 (1):23 - 42.
    James Rachels argued against the possibility of finding some moral capacity in humans that confers upon them a unique dignity. His argument contends that Darwinism challenges such attempts, because Darwinism predicts that any morally valuable capacity able to bestow a unique dignity is likely present to a degree within both humans and non-human animals alike. I make the case, however, that some of Darwin's own thoughts regarding the nature of conscience provide a springboard for criticising Rachels's claim here. Using (...)
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  23.  57
    Novel Assertions: A Reply to Mahon.Daisy Dixon - 2022 - British Journal of Aesthetics 62 (1):115-124.
    In a recent paper, James Edwin Mahon argues that literary artworks—novels in particular—never lie because they do not assert. In this discussion note, I reject Mahon’s conclusion that novels never lie. I argue that a central premiss in his argument—that novels do not contain assertions—is false. Mahon’s account underdetermines the content of literary works; novels have rich layers of content and can contain what I call ‘profound’ assertions, and ‘background’ assertions. I submit that Mahon therefore fails to establish that (...)
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  24.  48
    History of Modern Philosophy as an Issues-Based Introductory Course.Nicholas Dixon - 1990 - Teaching Philosophy 13 (3):253-263.
    My paper describes a method of teaching history of modern philosophy in a way which is accessible to students with no background in philosophy. The main innovation of the course is that the readings are organized around three themes: (1) theory of knowledge; (2) philosophy of religion; (3) the free will problem. This provides continuity between the readings, a feature often missing in historical courses. Moreover, seeing how different philosophical methods--rationalism (Descartes), empiricism (Hume), pragmatism (James), and twentieth century analytic (...)
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  25.  20
    Easier Said Than Done? Task Difficulty's Influence on Temporal Alignment, Semantic Similarity, and Complexity Matching Between Gestures and Speech.Lisette De Jonge-Hoekstra, Ralf F. A. Cox, Steffie Van der Steen & James A. Dixon - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (6):e12989.
    Gestures and speech are clearly synchronized in many ways. However, previous studies have shown that the semantic similarity between gestures and speech breaks down as people approach transitions in understanding. Explanations for these gesture–speech mismatches, which focus on gestures and speech expressing different cognitive strategies, have been criticized for disregarding gestures’ and speech's integration and synchronization. In the current study, we applied three different perspectives to investigate gesture–speech synchronization in an easy and a difficult task: temporal alignment, semantic similarity, and (...)
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  26.  14
    Buddhist Responses to Globalization, edited by Leah Kalmanson and James Mark Shields, Lexington Books, Lanham, MD, 2013. xiv+182 pp. $80.00. ISBN 978-0-7391-8054-9. [REVIEW]Graham Dixon - 2015 - Buddhist Studies Review 32 (1):168-171.
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  27.  60
    Hellenistic corinth - M.d. Dixon late classical and early hellenistic corinth, 338–196 B.c. Pp. XXII+231, ills, maps. London and new York: Routledge, 2014. Cased, £85, us$140. Isbn: 978-0-415-73551-3. [REVIEW]Sarah A. James - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (1):175-177.
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  28.  5
    Diary/Landscape.James Welling & Matthew S. Witkovsky - 2014 - University of Chicago Press.
    For more than 35 years, James Welling has explored the material and conceptual possibilities of photography. Diary/Landscape - the first mature body of work by this important contemporary artist - set the framework for his subsequent investigations of abstraction and his fascination with nineteenth- and twentieth-century New England. In July 1977, Welling began photographing a two-volume travel diary kept by his great-grandmother Elizabeth C. Dixon, as well as landscapes in southern Connecticut. A beautiful and moving meditation on family, (...)
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  29.  28
    American philosophy and the future.Michael Novak - 1968 - New York,: Scribner.
    To be human is to humanize; a radically empirical aesthetic, by J. J. McDermott.--Dream and nightmare; the future as revolution, by R. C. Pollock.--William James and metaphysical risk, by P. M. Van Buren.--Knowing as a passionate and personal quest; C. S. Peirce, by D. B. Burrell.--The fox alone is death; Whitehead and speculative philosophy, by A. J. Reck.--A man and a city; George Herbert Mead in Chicago, by R. M. Barry.--Royce; analyst of religion as community, by J. Collins.--Human (...)
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  30.  10
    Analyzing intention in utterances.James F. Allen & C. Raymond Perrault - 1980 - Artificial Intelligence 15 (3):143-178.
  31. Parapsychology: Science of the anomalous or search for the soul?James E. Alcock - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):553.
  32.  10
    Psychology: The Briefer Course.William James - 1985 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    “William James is a towering figure in the history of American thought--without doubt the foremost psychologist this country has produced. His depiction of mental life is faithful, vital, and subtle. In verve, he has no equal.... “There is a sharp contrast between the expanding horizon of James and the constricting horizon of much contemporary psychology. The one opens doors to discovery, the other closes them. Much psychology today is written in terms of reaction, little in terms of becoming. (...)
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  33.  69
    World, Mind, and Ethics: Essays on the Ethical Philosophy of Bernard Williams.James Edward John Altham & Ross Harrison (eds.) - 1995 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Bernard Williams is one of the most influential figures in ethical theory, where he has set a considerable part of the current agenda. In this collection a distinguished international team of philosophers who have been stimulated by Williams's work give responses to it. The topics covered include equality; consistency; comparisons between science and ethics; integrity; moral reasons; the moral system; and moral knowledge. Williams himself provides a substantial reply, which shows both the directions of his own thought and also his (...)
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  34.  61
    Data-owning democracy or digital socialism?James Muldoon - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy.
    This article contrasts two reform proposals articulated in recent debates about how to democratize the digital economy: data-owning democracy and digital socialism. A data-owning democracy is a political-economic regime characterized by the widespread distribution of data as capital among citizens, whereas digital socialism entails the social ownership of productive assets in the digital economy and popular control over digital services. The article argues that while a degree of complementarity exists between the two, there are important limitations to theories of data-owning (...)
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  35.  47
    Radicalism and Moderation in the New Academy.James Allen - 2022 - Phronesis 67 (2):133-160.
    A dispute in the form of rival interpretations of Carneades arose in the New Academy about whether the wise person is permitted to form opinions. One party rejected opinion; the other defended it. Because the terms enjoy a certain currency, the positions are here labelled ‘radical’ and ‘moderate’ respectively. This essay tackles the question whether and how they differed. It argues that the disagreement was less about human epistemic capacities than about the standards and aspirations against which they should be (...)
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  36.  62
    From Passions to Emotions: The Creation of a Secular Psychological Category (review).Max Rosenkrantz - 2005 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (2):214-215.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:From Passions to Emotions: The Creation of a Secular Psychological CategoryMax RosenkrantzThomas Dixon. From Passions to Emotions: The Creation of a Secular Psychological Category. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2003. Pp. x + 287. Cloth, $60.00Thomas Dixon's From Passions to Emotions defends a provocative set of theses. (1) The concept of "emotion" is of relatively recent vintage, having been designed by secular Scottish writers in the (...)
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  37.  28
    Radical, Sceptical and Liberal Enlightenment.James Alexander - 2020 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 14 (2):257-283.
    We still ask the question ‘What is Enlightenment?’ Every generation seems to offer new and contradictory answers to the question. In the last thirty or so years, the most interesting characterisations of Enlightenment have been by historians. They have told us that there is one Enlightenment, that there are two Enlightenments, that there are many Enlightenments. This has thrown up a second question, ‘How Many Enlightenments?’ In the spirit of collaboration and criticism, I answer both questions by arguing in this (...)
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  38.  82
    A genealogy of political theory: a polemic.James Alexander - 2019 - Contemporary Political Theory 18 (3):402-423.
    Here is a sketch of a genealogy of political theory for the last century. This is a genealogy in Nietzsche’s sense: therefore, neither unhistorical taxonomy, nor a history of political theory as it is written by historians, but a typology in time. Four types of modern political theory are distinguished. These are called, with some justification, positive, normative, third way and sceptical political theory. Seen from the vantage of the twenty-first century, they form an instructive sequence, emerging as a series (...)
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  39.  29
    Resolute Readings of the Tractatus.James Conant & Silver Bronzo - 2017 - In Hans-Johann Glock & John Hyman (eds.), A Companion to Wittgenstein. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 175–194.
    A spectator of the passing philosophical scene, recently encountering the current controversy about “resolute readings” of the Tractatus, might be forgiven for finding it difficult to figure out what the debate is supposed to be about and who exactly is on which side and why. This chapter demonstrates, through a reconstruction of some relevant features of “the” debate, that at one point there are in fact several orthogonal debates taking place, confusedly cast as contributions to a single debate. It indicates (...)
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  40.  19
    Philology: The Forgotten Origins of the Modern Humanities.James Turner - 2014 - Princeton University Press.
    A prehistory of today's humanities, from ancient Greece to the early twentieth century Many today do not recognize the word, but "philology" was for centuries nearly synonymous with humanistic intellectual life, encompassing not only the study of Greek and Roman literature and the Bible but also all other studies of language and literature, as well as history, culture, art, and more. In short, philology was the queen of the human sciences. How did it become little more than an archaic word? (...)
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  41.  32
    The Philosophy of Ecology: An Introduction.James Justus - 2021 - New York, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    Ecology is indispensable to understanding the biological world and addressing the environmental problems humanity faces. Its philosophy has never been more important. In this book, James Justus introduces readers to the philosophically rich issues ecology poses. Besides its crucial role in biological science generally, climate change, biodiversity loss, and other looming environmental challenges make ecology's role in understanding such threats and identifying solutions to them all the more critical. When ecology is applied and its insights marshalled to address these (...)
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  42. Failure and Expertise in the ancient conception of an art.James Allen - 1994 - In Horowitz Tami Tamar & Janis Allen (eds.), Scientific Failure. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 81-108.
    The articles examines how failure, especially in so-called 'stochastic' arts or sciences like medicine and navigation stimulated reflections about the nature of the knowledge required of a genuine art (techne) or science.
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  43.  44
    Paradox in Christian Theology: An Analysis of Its Presence, Character, and Epistemic Status.James Anderson - 2007 - Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock.
    Does traditional Christianity involve paradoxical doctrines, that is, doctrines that present the appearance (at least) of logical inconsistency? If so, what is the nature of these paradoxes and why do they arise? What is the relationship between "paradox" and "mystery" in theological theorizing? And what are the implications for the rationality, or otherwise, of orthodox Christian beliefs? In Paradox in Christian Theology, James Anderson argues that the doctrines of the Trinity and the incarnation, as derived from Scripture and formulated (...)
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  44. The natural philosophy of Akhenaten.James P. Allen - 1989 - In Religion and philosophy in ancient Egypt. New Haven, Conn.: Yale Egyptological Seminar, Dept. of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, the Graduate School, Yale University. pp. 3--89.
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  45.  43
    A Dialectical Definition of Conservatism.James Alexander - 2016 - Philosophy 91 (2):215-232.
    Conservatism is now often said to be a disposition. Against definitions of conservatism as a disposition, critics say that it is also an ideology, and against any such abstract definitions, that it is a historical entity. But no one has yet indicated how these criticisms can be used to improve the definition of conservatism. Here I argue that the dispositional understanding of conservatism, while not wrong in itself, is only the first and simplest element in what has to be an (...)
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  46.  26
    Is Semantics Necessary?James Higginbotham - 1988 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 88 (1):219-242.
    James Higginbotham; XIII*—Is Semantics Necessary?, Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Volume 88, Issue 1, 1 June 1988, Pages 219–242, https://doi.org/10.1.
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  47.  30
    Carneades.James Allen - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  48. Late scholastic probable arguments and their contrast with rhetorical and demonstrative arguments.James Franklin - 2022 - Philosophical Inquiries 10 (2).
    Aristotle divided arguments that persuade into the rhetorical (which happen to persuade), the dialectical (which are strong so ought to persuade to some degree) and the demonstrative (which must persuade if rightly understood). Dialectical arguments were long neglected, partly because Aristotle did not write a book about them. But in the sixteenth and seventeenth century late scholastic authors such as Medina, Cano and Soto developed a sound theory of probable arguments, those that have logical and not merely psychological force but (...)
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  49.  42
    Ethical norms, particular cases.James D. Wallace - 1996 - Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press.
    James D. Wallace treats moral considerations as beliefs about the right and wrong ways of doing things - beliefs whose source and authority are the same as any ...
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  50.  27
    Colloquium 5.James Allen - 1995 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 11 (1):177-205.
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