8 found
Order:
  1.  49
    Liberal Political Theory and the Cultural Migration of Ideas: The Case of Secularism in India.Jakob De Roover - 2011 - Political Theory 39 (5):571-599.
    The principles of liberal political theory are often said to be “freestanding.” Are they indeed sufficiently detached from the cultural setting where they emerged to be intelligible to people with other backgrounds? To answer this question, this essay examines the Indian secularism debate and develops a hypothesis on the process whereby liberal principles crystallized in the West and spread elsewhere. It argues that the secularization of western political thought has not produced independent rational principles, but transformed theological ideas into the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  2. The Secular State and Religious Conflict: Liberal Neutrality and the Indian Case of Pluralism.S. N. Balagangadhara & Jakob De Roover - 2007 - Journal of Political Philosophy 15 (1):67–92.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3.  4
    Aspects of Locke.James Farr, Jakob de Roover, Sn Balagangadhara & Léonard C. Feldman - 2008 - Political Theory 36 (4):495-577.
    This essay systematically reformulates an earlier argument about Locke and new world slavery, adding attention to Indians, natural law, and Locke's reception. Locke followed Grotian natural law in constructing a just-war theory of slavery. Unlike Grotius, though, he severely restricted the theory, making it inapplicable to America. It only fit resistance to “absolute power” in Stuart England. Locke was nonetheless an agent of British colonialism who issued instructions governing slavery. Yet they do not inform his theory—or vice versa. This creates (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  4.  20
    John Locke, Christian Liberty, and the Predicament of Liberal Toleration.Jakob De Roover & S. N. Balagangadhara - 2008 - Political Theory 36 (4):523-549.
    Recently, scholars have disputed whether Locke's political theory should be read as the groundwork of secular liberalism or as a Protestant political theology. Focusing on Locke's mature theory of toleration, the article raises a central question: What if these two readings are compatible? That is, what would be the consequences if Locke's political philosophy has theological foundations, but has also given shape to secular liberalism? Examining Locke's theory in the Letter Concerning Toleration, the article argues that this is indeed the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5.  75
    The Saint, the Criminal and the Terrorist: Towards a Hypothesis on Terrorism.S. N. Balagangadhara & Jakob De Roover - 2010 - Journal of Political Philosophy 18 (1):1-15.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  2
    Cultures Differ Differently: Selected Essays of S.N. Balagangadhara.Jakob De Roover & Sarika Rao - 2021 - Routledge India.
    This book presents essays by contemporary thinker and social scientist S. N. Balagangadhara which develop an alternative theoretical framework for a comparative study of Western and Asian cultures. It explores cultural difference in psychology, political theory, ethics, religion, sociology, translation, law, Indology, and philosophy.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. On the Road to Renaissance? [REVIEW]Jakob De Roover - 2016 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 20 (3):373-383.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  21
    Liberty, Tyranny and the Will of God.Jakob De Roover & S. N. Balagangadhara - 2009 - History of Political Thought 30 (1):111-139.
    Early modern political thought transformed toleration from a prudential consideration into a moral obligation. Three questions need to be answered by any explanation of this transition: Did religious toleration really become an obligation of the state in this period? If this was the case, how could tolerating heresy and idolatry possibly become a moral duty to Christians? How could Europeans both condemn practices as idolatrous and immoral, and yet insist that these practices ought to be tolerated? To answer these questions, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark