Results for 'Jack Scarborough'

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  1.  9
    The Ethical Implications of Short-Termism: Leadership Failure in the Executive Suite.Jack Scarborough - 1995 - International Journal of Value-Based Management 8 (1):25-37.
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  2.  9
    Paternalism: Jack Lively.Jack Lively - 1983 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 15:147-165.
    What I wish to do in this paper is to look at a part of John Stuart Mill's ‘one very simple principle’ for determining the limits of state intervention. This principle is, you will remember, that ‘the only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others. His own good, either physical or moral, is not a sufficient warrant.’.
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  3.  8
    The Truth of Mysticism: JACK C. CARLOYE.Jack C. Carloye - 1980 - Religious Studies 16 (1):1-13.
    In spite of many claims by people who have had the kind of mystical experiences that I want to discuss, such experiences do not reveal any reality beyond the experience itself; nor does the experience itself constitute a cosmic principle such as the Godhead, Absolute, One or Chaos. These experiences are in the last analysis merely subjective experiences. I say ‘merely’ here only to deny that the experiences have any significance for the cosmologists; not to deny that the experience has (...)
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  4.  40
    The Collapse of Chaos: Discovering Simplicity in a Complex World.Jack Cohen - 1994 - Viking Press.
    Jack Cohen and Ian Stewart explore the ability of complicated rules to generate simple behaviour in nature through 'the collapse of chaos'.
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  5. Perception and Basic Beliefs: Zombies, Modules and the Problem of the External World.Jack C. Lyons - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    This book offers solutions to two persistent and I believe closely related problems in epistemology. The first problem is that of drawing a principled distinction between perception and inference: what is the difference between seeing that something is the case and merely believing it on the basis of what we do see? The second problem is that of specifying which beliefs are epistemologically basic (i.e., directly, or noninferentially, justified) and which are not. I argue that what makes a belief a (...)
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  6. The Analytics of Uncertainty and Information.Jack Hirshleifer & John G. Riley - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Economists have always recognised that human endeavours are constrained by our limited and uncertain knowledge, but only recently has an accepted theory of uncertainty and information evolved. This theory has turned out to have surprisingly practical applications: for example in analysing stock market returns, in evaluating accident prevention measures, and in assessing patent and copyright laws. This book presents these intellectual advances in readable form for the first time. It unifies many important but partial results into a satisfying single picture, (...)
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  7.  30
    Phenomenology, Naturalism and Science: A Hybrid and Heretical Proposal.Jack Reynolds - 2017 - New York: Routledge.
    In _Phenomenology, Naturalism and Empirical Science_, Jack Reynolds takes the controversial position that phenomenology and naturalism are compatible, and develops a hybrid account of phenomenology and empirical science. Though phenomenology and naturalism are typically understood as philosophically opposed to one another, Reynolds argues that this resistance is based on an understanding of transcendental phenomenology that is ultimately untenable and in need of updating. Phenomenology, as Reynolds reorients it, is compatible with liberal naturalism, as well as with weak forms of (...)
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  8.  10
    The Theft of History.Jack Goody - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Professor Jack Goody builds on his own previous work to extend further his highly influential critique of what he sees as the pervasive eurocentric or occidentalist biases of so much western historical writing. Goody also examines the consequent 'theft' by the West of the achievements of other cultures in the invention of (notably) democracy, capitalism, individualism, and love. The Theft of History discusses a number of theorists in detail, including Marx, Weber and Norbert Elias, and engages with critical admiration (...)
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  9.  89
    What is Hope?Jack M. C. Kwong - 2019 - European Journal of Philosophy 27 (1):243-254.
    According to the standard account, to hope for an outcome is to desire it and to believe that its realization is possible, though not inevitable. This account, however, faces certain difficulties: It cannot explain how people can display differing strengths in hope; it cannot distinguish hope from despair; and it cannot explain substantial hopes. This paper proposes an account of hope that can meet these deficiencies. Briefly, it argues that in addition to possessing the relevant belief–desire structure as allowed in (...)
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  10. Book Review: Make-Believe Media: Reviewed by Jack A. Nelson. [REVIEW]Jack A. Nelson & Deni Elliott - 1992 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 7 (3):188 – 189.
     
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  11.  42
    Explaining Economic Change: The Interplay Between Cognition and Institutions: Jack Knight and Douglass North.Jack Knight - 1997 - Legal Theory 3 (3):211-226.
    Economic theory is built on assumptions about human behavior—assumptions embodied in rational-choice theory. Underlying these assumptions are implicit notions about how we think and learn. These implicit notions are fundamentally important to social explanation. The very plausibility of the explanations that we develop out of rational-choice theory rests crucially on the accuracy of these notions about cognition and rationality. But there is a basic problem: There is often very little relationship between the assumptions that rational-choice theorists make and the way (...)
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  12.  64
    How to Theorize About Hope.Jack M. C. Kwong - forthcoming - European Journal of Philosophy.
    In order to better understand the topic of hope, this paper argues that two separate theories are needed: One for hoping, and the other for hopefulness. This bifurcated approach is warranted by the observation that the word ‘hope’ is polysemous: It is sometimes used to refer to hoping and sometimes, to feeling or being hopeful. Moreover, these two senses of 'hope' are distinct, as a person can hope for some outcome yet not simultaneously feel hopeful about it. I argue that (...)
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  13.  1
    John Buridan: Portrait of a Fourteenth-Century Arts Master.Jack Zupko - 2003 - Notre Dame.
    John Buridan was the most famous philosophy teacher of his time, and probably the most influential. In this important new book, Jack Zupko offers the first systematic exposition of Buridan's thought to appear in any language. Zupko uses Buridan's own conception of the order and practice of philosophy to depict the most salient features of his thought, beginning with his views on the nature of language and logic and then illustrating their application to a series of topics in metaphysics, (...)
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  14.  93
    Practice Consequentialism: A New Twist on an Old Theory: S. Jack Odell.S. Jack Odell - 2001 - Utilitas 13 (1):86-105.
    In this paper I defend a version of consequentialism that is neither of the act nor the rule variety. I argue that most, if not all, acceptable moral rules are formulations of intricate and interrelated practices that serve to promote harmonious co-existence between human beings; that these formulations – moral rules – are shorthand abbreviations of the lengthy formulations which would be required to actually describe the extremely complicated set of prescriptions and prohibitions which comprise our ethical practices; that we (...)
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  15.  5
    Learning From the Right Neighbour: An Interview with Jack Vromen.Jack J. Vromen - 2015 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 8 (1):82.
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  16. Beyond Beliefs Ideological Foundations of American Education [by] Normand R. Bernier and Jack E. Williams.Normand R. Bernier & Jack E. Williams - 1973 - Prentice-Hall.
     
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  17.  1
    Adam Smith's Pluralism: Rationality, Education, and the Moral Sentiments.Jack Russell Weinstein - 2013 - Yale University Press.
    In this thought-provoking study, Jack Russell Weinstein suggests the foundations of liberalism can be found in the writings of Adam Smith, a pioneer of modern economic theory and a major figure in the Scottish Enlightenment. While offering an interpretive methodology for approaching Smith’s two major works, _The Theory of Moral Sentiments _and _The Wealth of Nations_, Weinstein argues against the libertarian interpretation of Smith, emphasizing his philosophies of education and rationality. Weinstein also demonstrates that Smith should be recognized for (...)
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  18.  65
    The Unity of Dependence.Jack Casey - 2022 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association (2):1-18.
    Most philosophers treat ontological dependence and metaphysical dependence as distinct relations. A number of key differences between the two relations are usually cited in support of this claim: ontological dependence's unique connection to existence, differing respective connections to metaphysical necessitation, and a divergence in their formal features. Alongside reshaping some of the examples used to maintain the distinction between the two, I argue that the additional resources offered by the increased attention the notion of grounding has received in recent years (...)
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  19.  2
    Understanding Everyday Life: Toward the Reconstruction of Sociological Knowledge.Jack D. Douglas - 1970 - Chicago: Aldine Pub. Co..
  20. Relativity and Degrees of Relationality.Jack Spencer - 2016 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 92 (2):432-459.
    Some well-known metaphysical arguments against relativism rest on the claim that relativity somehow must be accompanied by relationality. I argue otherwise, and trace the consequences for some prominent disputes between relativists and absolutists.
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  21.  29
    On the Continuity of Metaphysics with Science: Some Scepticism and Some Suggestions.Jack Ritchie - 2022 - Metaphilosophy 53 (2-3):202-220.
  22. Adam Ferguson and Ethical Integrity: The Man and His Prescriptions for the Moral Life.Jack A. Hill - 2016 - Lexington Books.
    Part biography and part constructive ethical inquiry, this book is an original interpretation of the Scottish philosopher Adam Ferguson’s ethical method and view of ethical integrity, with an emphasis on his Analysis, Institutes, and Principles.
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  23. A Theory of Psychological Reactance.Jack Williams Brehm - 1966 - New York: Academic Press.
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  24. Why Take Both Boxes?Jack Spencer & Ian Wells - 2019 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 99 (1):27-48.
    The crucial premise of the standard argument for two-boxing in Newcomb's problem, a causal dominance principle, is false. We present some counterexamples. We then offer a metaethical explanation for why the counterexamples arise. Our explanation reveals a new and superior argument for two-boxing, one that eschews the causal dominance principle in favor of a principle linking rational choice to guidance and actual value maximization.
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  25. Emotion, Social Theory, and Social Structure: A Macrosociological Approach.Jack M. Barbalet - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    Emotion, Social Theory, and Social Structure takes sociology in a new direction. It examines key aspects of social structure by using a fresh understanding of emotions categories. Through that synthesis emerge new perspectives on rationality, class structure, social action, conformity, basic rights, and social change. As well as giving an innovative view of social processes, J. M. Barbalet's study also reveals unappreciated aspects of emotions by considering fear, resentment, vengefulness, shame, and confidence in the context of social structure. While much (...)
     
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  26.  20
    The Nature of Intention.Jack W. Meiland - 1970 - London: Methuen.
  27.  64
    Revolutions: A Very Short Introduction.Jack A. Goldstone - 2013 - Oup Usa.
    Revolutions have shaped world politics for the last three hundred years. This volume shows why revolutions occur, how they unfold, and where they created democracies and dictatorships. Jack A. Goldstone presents the history of revolutions from America and France to the collapse of the Soviet Union, 'People Power' revolutions, and the Arab revolts.
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  28. An Argument Against Causal Decision Theory.Jack Spencer - 2021 - Analysis 81 (1):52-61.
    This paper develops an argument against causal decision theory. I formulate a principle of preference, which I call the Guaranteed Principle. I argue that the preferences of rational agents satisfy the Guaranteed Principle, that the preferences of agents who embody causal decision theory do not, and hence that causal decision theory is false.
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  29. Able to Do the Impossible.Jack Spencer - 2017 - Mind 126 (502):466-497.
    According to a widely held principle—the poss-ability principle—an agent, S, is able to only if it is metaphysically possible for S to. I argue against the poss-ability principle by developing a novel class of counterexamples. I then argue that the consequences of rejecting the poss-ability principle are interesting and far-reaching.
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  30. Understanding Everyday Life: Toward the Reconstruction of Sociological Knowledge.Jack D. Douglas - 1971 - London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.
    Understanding Everyday Life All of sociology necessarily begins with the understanding of everyday life, and all of sociology is directed either to ...
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  31.  18
    Rebecca Scarborough.Judith P. Hallett, Nicole Love, David McDonald, Benjy Shyovitz & Jordan Smith - 2018 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 111 (4):577-578.
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  32. Prescription--Medicide: The Goodness of Planned Death.Jack Kevorkian - 1991 - Prometheus Books.
    Examines the ethics of euthanasia, and discusses capital punishment, organ donation, and the Hippocratic oath.
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  33.  1
    The Essential Turing: Seminal Writings in Computing, Logic, Philosophy, Artificial Intelligence, and Artificial Life P Lus the Secrets of Enigma.B. Jack Copeland (ed.) - 2004 - Oxford, England: Oxford University Press UK.
    Alan Turing, pioneer of computing and WWII codebreaker, is one of the most important and influential thinkers of the twentieth century. In this volume for the first time his key writings are made available to a broad, non-specialist readership. They make fascinating reading both in their own right and for their historic significance: contemporary computational theory, cognitive science, artificial intelligence, and artificial life all spring from this ground-breaking work, which is also rich in philosophical and logical insight.
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  34. The Turing Guide.Jack Copeland, Jonathan Bowen, Robin Wilson & Mark Sprevak (eds.) - 2017 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    This volume celebrates the various facets of Alan Turing (1912–1954), the British mathematician and computing pioneer, widely considered as the father of computer science. It is aimed at the general reader, with additional notes and references for those who wish to explore the life and work of Turing more deeply. -/- The book is divided into eight parts, covering different aspects of Turing’s life and work. -/- Part I presents various biographical aspects of Turing, some from a personal point of (...)
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  35. Trusting the Subject?: Volume One.Anthony Jack & Andreas Roepstorff (eds.) - 2003 - Imprint Academic.
    Introspective evidence is still treated with great suspicion in cognitive science. This work is designed to encourage cognitive scientists to take more account of the subject's unique perspective.
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  36.  4
    Reflections on Reading Adam Ferguson.Jack A. Hill - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (3):320-328.
  37.  1
    Trusting the Subject?: Volume Two.Anthony Jack & Andreas Roepstorff (eds.) - 2003 - Imprint Academic.
    Introspective evidence is still treated with great suspicion in cognitive science. This work is designed to encourage cognitive scientists to take more account of the subject's unique perspective.
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  38. Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice, 3rd Edition.Jack Donnelly - 2013 - Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.
  39.  11
    Peer Influence in Adolescence: Public-Health Implications for COVID-19.Jack L. Andrews, Lucy Foulkes & Sarah-Jayne Blakemore - 2020 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 24 (8):585-587.
  40.  50
    Trusting the Subject? The Use of Introspective Evidence in Cognitive Science Volume.Anthony I. Jack (ed.) - 2003 - Thorverton UK: Imprint Academic.
    This phenomenon is an extension of the 'why trust the subject' question asked in the introduction ... critical use of verbal reports in cognitive science. ...
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  41.  6
    The Dark Side of the Force: Economic Foundations of Conflict Theory.Jack Hirshleifer - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    The central tradition of mainline economics deals with one way of making a living; producing goods and services. But there is another way of getting ahead through conflict or the 'dark side', by appropriating what others have produced. Parallel to military aggression and resistance, the dark side includes non-military activities such as litigation, strikes and lockouts, takeover contests, and bureaucratic back-biting struggles. This volume brings the analysis of conflict into the mainstream of economics. Part I explores the causes, conduct, and (...)
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  42. Is Open-Mindedness Conducive to Truth?Jack M. C. Kwong - 2017 - Synthese 194 (5).
    Open-mindedness is generally regarded as an intellectual virtue because its exercise reliably leads to truth. However, some theorists have argued that open-mindedness’s truth-conduciveness is highly contingent, pointing out that it is either not truth-conducive at all under certain scenarios or no better than dogmatism or credulity in others. Given such shaky ties to truth, it would appear that the status of open-mindedness as an intellectual virtue is in jeopardy. In this paper, I propose to defend open-mindedness against these challenges. In (...)
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  43. Rational monism and rational pluralism.Jack Spencer - 2020 - Philosophical Studies 178 (6):1769-1800.
    Consequentialists often assume rational monism: the thesis that options are always made rationally permissible by the maximization of the selfsame quantity. This essay argues that consequentialists should reject rational monism and instead accept rational pluralism: the thesis that, on different occasions, options are made rationally permissible by the maximization of different quantities. The essay then develops a systematic form of rational pluralism which, unlike its rivals, is capable of handling both the Newcomb problems that challenge evidential decision theory and the (...)
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  44.  79
    The New Critical Thinking: An Empirically Informed Introduction.Jack Lyons & Barry Ward - 2017 - New York: Routledge.
    This innovative text is psychologically informed, both in its diagnosis of inferential errors, and in teaching students how to watch out for and work around their natural intellectual blind spots. It also incorporates insights from epistemology and philosophy of science that are indispensable for learning how to evaluate premises. The result is a hands-on primer for real world critical thinking. The authors bring a fresh approach to the traditional challenges of a critical thinking course: effectively explaining the nature of validity, (...)
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  45.  85
    Biological Individuality: The Identity and Persistence of Living Entities.Jack Wilson - 1999 - Cambridge University Press.
    What makes a biological entity an individual? Jack Wilson shows that past philosophers have failed to explicate the conditions an entity must satisfy to be a living individual. He explores the reason for this failure and explains why we should limit ourselves to examples involving real organisms rather than thought experiments. This book explores and resolves paradoxes that arise when one applies past notions of individuality to biological examples beyond the conventional range and presents an analysis of identity and (...)
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  46. Spinoza in Twenty-First-Century American and French Philosophy: Metaphysics, Philosophy of Mind, Moral and Political Philosophy.Jack Stetter & Charles Ramond (eds.) - 2019 - London: Bloomsbury Academic.
    Contributors: Steven Barbone, Laurent Bove, Edwin Curley, Valérie Debuiche, Michael Della Rocca, Simon B. Duffy, Daniel Garber, Pascale Gillot, Céline Hervet, Jonathan Israel, Chantal Jaquet, Mogens Lærke, Jacqueline Lagrée, Martin Lin, Yitzhak Y. Melamed, Pierre-François Moreau, Steven Nadler, Knox Peden, Alison Peterman, Charles Ramond, Michael A. Rosenthal, Pascal Sévérac, Hasana Sharp, Jack Stetter, Ariel Suhamy, Lorenzo Vinciguerra.
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  47. Exploring People’s Beliefs About the Experience of Time.Jack Shardlow, Ruth Lee, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack, Patrick Burns & Alison S. Fernandes - 2021 - Synthese 198 (11):10709-10731.
    Philosophical debates about the metaphysics of time typically revolve around two contrasting views of time. On the A-theory, time is something that itself undergoes change, as captured by the idea of the passage of time; on the B-theory, all there is to time is events standing in before/after or simultaneity relations to each other, and these temporal relations are unchanging. Philosophers typically regard the A-theory as being supported by our experience of time, and they take it that the B-theory clashes (...)
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  48.  44
    Must All Be Saved? A Kierkegaardian Response to Theological Universalism.Jack Mulder - 2006 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 59 (1):1-24.
    In this paper, I consider how a Kierkegaardian could respond critically to the question of strong theological universalism, i.e., the belief that all individuals must eventually be reconciled to God and experience everlasting happiness. A Kierkegaardian would likely reject what Thomas Talbott has called “conservative theism,” but has the resources to mount a sustained attack on the view that all individuals must experience everlasting happiness. Some have seen that Kierkegaard has some potential in this regard, but a full Kierkegaardian response (...)
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  49.  7
    Attitudes and the Stalled Gender Revolution: Egalitarianism, Traditionalism, and Ambivalence From 1977 Through 2016.Barbara Risman, Ray Sin & William J. Scarborough - 2019 - Gender and Society 33 (2):173-200.
    Empirical studies show that though there is more room for improvement, much progress has been made toward gender equality since the second wave of feminism. Evidence also suggests that women’s advancements have been more dramatic in the public sphere of work and politics than in the private sphere of family life. We argue that this lopsided gender progress may be traced to uneven changes in gender attitudes. Using data from more than 27,000 respondents who participated in the General Social Survey (...)
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  50. Can It Be Irrational to Knowingly Choose the Best?Jack Spencer - forthcoming - Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
    Seeking a decision theory that can handle both the Newcomb problems that challenge evidential decision theory and the unstable problems that challenge causal decision theory, some philosophers recently have turned to ‘graded ratifiability’. The graded ratifiability approach to decision theory is, however, despite its virtues, unsatisfactory; for it conflicts with the platitude that it is always rationally permissible for an agent to knowingly choose their best option.
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