14 found
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  1.  8
    Software engineering standards for epidemiological models.Jack K. Horner & John F. Symons - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (4):1-24.
    There are many tangled normative and technical questions involved in evaluating the quality of software used in epidemiological simulations. In this paper we answer some of these questions and offer practical guidance to practitioners, funders, scientific journals, and consumers of epidemiological research. The heart of our paper is a case study of the Imperial College London covid-19 simulator, set in the context of recent work in epistemology of simulation and philosophy of epidemiology.
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  2.  7
    Why There is no General Solution to the Problem of Software Verification.John Symons & Jack K. Horner - 2020 - Foundations of Science 25 (3):541-557.
    How can we be certain that software is reliable? Is there any method that can verify the correctness of software for all cases of interest? Computer scientists and software engineers have informally assumed that there is no fully general solution to the verification problem. In this paper, we survey approaches to the problem of software verification and offer a new proof for why there can be no general solution.
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  3.  17
    Understanding Error Rates in Software Engineering: Conceptual, Empirical, and Experimental Approaches.Jack K. Horner & John Symons - 2019 - Philosophy and Technology 32 (2):363-378.
    Software-intensive systems are ubiquitous in the industrialized world. The reliability of software has implications for how we understand scientific knowledge produced using software-intensive systems and for our understanding of the ethical and political status of technology. The reliability of a software system is largely determined by the distribution of errors and by the consequences of those errors in the usage of that system. We select a taxonomy of software error types from the literature on empirically observed software errors and compare (...)
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  4.  29
    Are Transcendental Arguments Distinctive?Jack K. Horner - 1977 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 15 (3):317-326.
  5.  2
    Are Transcendental Arguments Distinctive?Jack K. Horner - 1977 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 15 (3):317-326.
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  6.  6
    A Computationally Assisted Reconstruction of an Ontological Argument in Spinoza’s The Ethics.Jack K. Horner - 2019 - Open Philosophy 2 (1):211-229.
    The comments accompanying Proposition 11 in Part I of Spinoza’s The Ethics contain sketches of what appear to be at least three more or less distinct ontological arguments. The first of these is problematic even on its own terms. More is true: even the proposition “God exists”, a consequence of Prop. 11, cannot be derived from the definitions and axioms of Part I of The Ethics; thus, Prop. 11 cannot be derived from the DAPI, either. To prove these claims, I (...)
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  7.  4
    Logic, Laws, and Life. [REVIEW]Jack K. Horner - 1980 - Auslegung 7 (2):205-222.
  8.  35
    Putnam's Complaint.Jack K. Horner - 1976 - Auslegung 3 (June):166-173.
  9.  12
    Second Thoughts On Sarah's First Signs.Jack K. Horner - unknown
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  10.  8
    The Case Of The Brobdingnagian Lilliputian: A Swiftly Penned Reply to Shrader.Jack K. Horner - unknown
  11.  14
    The Konigsberg Interpretation Of Quantum Mechanics?Jack K. Horner - unknown
  12.  38
    Who Apes English?Jack K. Horner - 1981 - Semiotics:347-357.
  13.  14
    Was Einstein A Laplacean?Jack K. Horner - unknown
  14.  78
    What Have Google’s Random Quantum Circuit Simulation Experiments Demonstrated About Quantum Supremacy?Jack K. Horner & John Symons - forthcoming - In Hamid R. Arabnia, Leonidas Deligiannidis, Fernando G. Tinetti & Quoc-Nam Tran (eds.), Advances in Software Engineering, Education, and e-Learning. Cham, Switzerland: Springer Nature.
    Quantum computing is of high interest because it promises to perform at least some kinds of computations much faster than classical computers. Arute et al. 2019 (informally, “the Google Quantum Team”) report the results of experiments that purport to demonstrate “quantum supremacy” – the claim that the performance of some quantum computers is better than that of classical computers on some problems. Do these results close the debate over quantum supremacy? We argue that they do not. In the following, we (...)
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