Results for 'Jack Honvank'

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  1. Conscious and unconscious processing of emotional faces.Jack Honvank & Edward H. F. Haaden - 2001 - In Beatrice De Gelder, Edward H. F. De Haan & Charles A. Heywood (eds.), Out of Mind: Varieties of Unconscious Processes. Oxford University Press. pp. 222-237.
  2. The Self-Effacement Gambit.Jack Woods - 2019 - Res Philosophica 96 (2):113-139.
    Philosophical arguments usually are and nearly always should be abductive. Across many areas, philosophers are starting to recognize that often the best we can do in theorizing some phenomena is put forward our best overall account of it, warts and all. This is especially true in esoteric areas like logic, aesthetics, mathematics, and morality where the data to be explained is often based in our stubborn intuitions. -/- While this methodological shift is welcome, it's not without problems. Abductive arguments involve (...)
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  3. Testimonial Smothering and Domestic Violence Disclosure in Clinical Contexts.Jack Warman - 2023 - Episteme 20 (1):107-124.
    Domestic violence and abuse (DVA) are at last coming to be recognised as serious global public health problems. Nevertheless, many women with personal histories of DVA decline to disclose them to healthcare practitioners. In the health sciences, recent empirical work has identified many factors that impede DVA disclosure, known as barriers to disclosure. Drawing on recent work in social epistemology on testimonial silencing, we might wonder why so many people withhold their testimony and whether there is some kind of epistemic (...)
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  4.  42
    Philosophy and/or politics.Jack Reynolds - 2017 - In Matthew Sharpe, Rory Jeffs & Jack Reynolds (eds.), 100 years of European philosophy since the Great War: crisis and reconfigurations. Cham: Springer. pp. 215-232.
    In this chapter, I revisit the question of the philosophical significance of the Great War upon the trajectory of philosophy in the twentieth century. While accounts of this are very rare in philosophy, and this is itself symptomatic, those that are given are also strangely implausible. They usually assert one of two things: that the War had little or no philosophical significance because most of the major developments had already begun, or—at the opposite extreme—they maintain that nothing was ever the (...)
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  5. Artificial Intelligence: A Philosophical Introduction.Jack Copeland - 1993 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    Presupposing no familiarity with the technical concepts of either philosophy or computing, this clear introduction reviews the progress made in AI since the inception of the field in 1956. Copeland goes on to analyze what those working in AI must achieve before they can claim to have built a thinking machine and appraises their prospects of succeeding. There are clear introductions to connectionism and to the language of thought hypothesis which weave together material from philosophy, artificial intelligence and neuroscience. John (...)
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  6.  10
    Sacred Doctrine, Secular Practice: Theology and Philosophy in the Faculty of Arts at Paris, 1325–1400.Jack Zupko - 1997 - In Jan Aertsen & Andreas Speer (eds.), Was ist Philosophie im Mittelalter? Qu'est-ce que la philosophie au moyen âge? What is Philosophy in the Middle Ages?: Akten des X. Internationalen Kongresses für Mittelalterliche Philosophie der Société Internationale pour l'Etude de la Philosophie Médié. Erfurt: De Gruyter. pp. 656-666.
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  7. Despair and Hopelessness.Jack M. C. Kwong - 2024 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 10 (2):225-242.
    It has recently been argued that hope is polysemous in that it sometimes refers to hoping and other times to being hopeful. That it has these two distinct senses is reflected in the observation that a person can hope for an outcome without being hopeful that it will occur. Below, I offer a new argument for this distinction. My strategy is to show that accepting this distinction yields a rich account of two distinct ways in which hope can be lost, (...)
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  8. The Concept of Totality: Visions of the Whole in the Work of Fredric Jameson.Jack Coopey - unknown
    The thesis presented here focuses on the concept of totality in the work of the contemporary cultural critic Fredric Jameson (1934–). By totality, we mean how the human heart enables the human body, but without the body, the heart has no part concerning the whole; they are mutually dependent. This work shall argue that totality is the allegorical figuration framing Jameson’s political critiques of modernity in The Political Unconscious (1981) and Postmodernism (1991). The postmodern world today as an absent totality (...)
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  9. After Pascal’s Wager: on religious belief, regulated and rationally held.Jack Warman & David Efird - 2021 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 90 (1):61-78.
    In Pascal’s famous wager, he claims that the seeking non-believer can induce genuine religious belief in herself by joining a religious community and taking part in its rituals. This form of belief regulation is epistemologically puzzling: can we form beliefs in this way, and could such beliefs be rationally held? In the first half of the paper, we explain how the regimen could allow the seeking non-believer to regulate her religious beliefs by intervening on her evidence and epistemic standards. In (...)
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  10. Resisting aliefs: Gendler on belief-discordant behaviors.Jack M. C. Kwong - 2012 - Philosophical Psychology 25 (1):77 - 91.
    This paper challenges T. S. Gendler's notion of aliefs, a novel kind of mental state which she introduces to explain a wide variety of belief-discordant behaviors. In particular, I argue that many of the cases which she uses to motivate such a mental state can be fully explained by accounts that make use only of commonplace attitudes such as beliefs and desires.
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  11.  7
    Trusting the Subject?: Volume Two.Anthony Jack & Andreas Roepstorff (eds.) - 2003 - Imprint Academic.
    Introspective evidence is still treated with great suspicion in cognitive science. This work is designed to encourage cognitive scientists to take more account of the subject's unique perspective.
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  12.  74
    Lesion studies, spared performance, and cognitive systems.Jack C. Lyons - 2003 - Cortex 39 (1):145-7.
    A short discussion piece arguing that the neuropsychological phenomenon of double dissociations is most revealing of underlying cognitive architecture because of the capacities that are spared, more than the capacities that are lost.
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  13. Perception and Basic Beliefs: Zombies, Modules and the Problem of the External World.Jack C. Lyons - 2009 - New York, US: Oxford University Press. Edited by Jack Lyons.
    This book offers solutions to two persistent and I believe closely related problems in epistemology. The first problem is that of drawing a principled distinction between perception and inference: what is the difference between seeing that something is the case and merely believing it on the basis of what we do see? The second problem is that of specifying which beliefs are epistemologically basic (i.e., directly, or noninferentially, justified) and which are not. I argue that what makes a belief a (...)
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  14. Annotated insights into legal reasoning: A dataset of Article 6 ECHR cases.Jack Mumford, Katie Atkinson & Trevor Bench-Capon - 2024 - Argument and Computation:1-7.
    We present a novel annotated dataset of legal cases pertaining to Article 6 – the right to a fair trial – of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). This dataset will serve as a useful resource to the research community, to assist in the training and evaluation of AI systems designed to embody the legal reasoning involved in determining the appropriate legal outcome from a description of the case material. The annotations were applied to provide finer-grain classifications of legal (...)
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  15. Methodological Pluralism.Jack Wright - 2023 - In Jack Wright & Jessica Goddard (eds.), Dictionary of Ecological Economics.
  16. Pluralism.Jack Wright & Jessica Goddard - 2023 - In Jack Wright & Jessica Goddard (eds.), Dictionary of Ecological Economics.
  17. A theory of psychological reactance.Jack Williams Brehm - 1966 - New York,: Academic Press.
  18.  24
    Response to simultaneous stimulation of two sense modalities.Jack A. Adams & Ridgely W. Chambers - 1962 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 63 (2):198.
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  19.  13
    Philosophy of science: issues and problems.Jack A. Aigbodioh - 1997 - Ibadan, Nigeria: Hope Publications.
  20. Dictionary of Ecological Economics.Jack Wright & Jessica Goddard (eds.) - 2023
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  21. Understanding Naturalism.Jack Ritchie - 2008 - Stocksfield [England]: Routledge.
    Many contemporary Anglo-American philosophers describe themselves as naturalists. But what do they mean by that term? Popular naturalist slogans like, "there is no first philosophy" or "philosophy is continuous with the natural sciences" are far from illuminating. "Understanding Naturalism" provides a clear and readable survey of the main strands in recent naturalist thought. The origin and development of naturalist ideas in epistemology, metaphysics and semantics is explained through the works of Quine, Goldman, Kuhn, Chalmers, Papineau, Millikan and others. The most (...)
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  22. Emotion, Social Theory, and Social Structure: A Macrosociological Approach.Jack M. Barbalet - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    Emotion, Social Theory, and Social Structure takes sociology in a new direction. It examines key aspects of social structure by using a fresh understanding of emotions categories. Through that synthesis emerge new perspectives on rationality, class structure, social action, conformity, basic rights, and social change. As well as giving an innovative view of social processes, J. M. Barbalet's study also reveals unappreciated aspects of emotions by considering fear, resentment, vengefulness, shame, and confidence in the context of social structure. While much (...)
     
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  23.  56
    The collapse of chaos: discovering simplicity in a complex world.Jack Cohen - 1994 - New York: Viking Press. Edited by Ian Stewart.
    Jack Cohen and Ian Stewart explore the ability of complicated rules to generate simple behaviour in nature through 'the collapse of chaos'.
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  24. How to theorize about hope.Jack M. C. Kwong - 2022 - European Journal of Philosophy 30 (4):1426-1439.
    In order to better understand the topic of hope, this paper argues that two separate theories are needed: One for hoping, and the other for hopefulness. This bifurcated approach is warranted by the observation that the word ‘hope’ is polysemous: It is sometimes used to refer to hoping and sometimes, to feeling or being hopeful. Moreover, these two senses of 'hope' are distinct, as a person can hope for some outcome yet not simultaneously feel hopeful about it. I argue that (...)
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  25. What is hope?Jack M. C. Kwong - 2019 - European Journal of Philosophy 27 (1):243-254.
    According to the standard account, to hope for an outcome is to desire it and to believe that its realization is possible, though not inevitable. This account, however, faces certain difficulties: It cannot explain how people can display differing strengths in hope; it cannot distinguish hope from despair; and it cannot explain substantial hopes. This paper proposes an account of hope that can meet these deficiencies. Briefly, it argues that in addition to possessing the relevant belief–desire structure as allowed in (...)
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  26. The Phenomenology of Hope.Jack M. C. Kwong - 2022 - American Philosophical Quarterly 59 (3):313-325.
    What is the phenomenology of hope? A common view is that hope has a generally positive and pleasant affective tone. This rosy depiction, however, has recently been challenged. Certain hopes, it has been objected, are such that they are either entirely negative in valence or neutral in tone. In this paper, I argue that this challenge has only limited success. In particular, I show that it only applies to one sense of hope but leaves another sense—one that is implicitly but (...)
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  27.  19
    Feedback theory of how joint receptors regulate the timing and positioning of a limb.Jack A. Adams - 1977 - Psychological Review 84 (6):504-523.
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  28. Logical Partisanhood.Jack Woods - 2019 - Philosophical Studies 176 (5):1203-1224.
    A natural suggestion and increasingly popular account of how to revise our logical beliefs treats revision of logic analogously to the revision of scientific theories. I investigate this approach and argue that simple applications of abductive methodology to logic result in revision-cycles, developing a detailed case study of an actual dispute with this property. This is problematic if we take abductive methodology to provide justification for revising our logical framework. I then generalize the case study, pointing to similarities with more (...)
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  29. Is Open-Mindedness Conducive to Truth?Jack M. C. Kwong - 2017 - Synthese 194 (5).
    Open-mindedness is generally regarded as an intellectual virtue because its exercise reliably leads to truth. However, some theorists have argued that open-mindedness’s truth-conduciveness is highly contingent, pointing out that it is either not truth-conducive at all under certain scenarios or no better than dogmatism or credulity in others. Given such shaky ties to truth, it would appear that the status of open-mindedness as an intellectual virtue is in jeopardy. In this paper, I propose to defend open-mindedness against these challenges. In (...)
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  30.  12
    Understanding everyday life.Jack D. Douglas - 1970 - Chicago,: Aldine Pub. Co..
  31.  7
    Masking: Response-ability, in Unsteady, Broken Breaths.Jack Wallace - 2020 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 53 (3):336-343.
    ABSTRACT A reflection on the “mask,” as a question of response and responsibility in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.
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  32.  3
    What's alike? what's different?: the book of comparing.Jack Wassermann - 1990 - New York: Walker & Co.. Edited by Selma Wassermann & Dennis Smith.
    Introduces the skill of comparing and challenges the reader to practice and master it as a part of thinking critically and creatively.
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  33. Relativity in a Fundamentally Absolute World.Jack Spencer - 2022 - Philosophical Perspectives 36 (1):305-328.
    This paper develops a view on which: (a) all fundamental facts are absolute, (b) some facts do not supervene on the fundamental facts, and (c) only relative facts fail to supervene on the fundamental facts.
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  34. Hope and Hopefulness.Jack M. C. Kwong - 2020 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 50 (7):832-843.
    This paper proposes a new framework for thinking about hope, with certain unexpected consequences. Specifically, I argue that a shift in focus from locutions like “x hopes that” and “x is hoping that” to “x is hopeful that” and “x has hope that” can improve our understanding of hope. This approach, which emphasizes hopefulness as the central concept, turns out to be more revealing and fruitful in tackling some of the issues that philosophers have raised about hope, such as the (...)
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  35. Rational monism and rational pluralism.Jack Spencer - 2020 - Philosophical Studies 178 (6):1769-1800.
    Consequentialists often assume rational monism: the thesis that options are always made rationally permissible by the maximization of the selfsame quantity. This essay argues that consequentialists should reject rational monism and instead accept rational pluralism: the thesis that, on different occasions, options are made rationally permissible by the maximization of different quantities. The essay then develops a systematic form of rational pluralism which, unlike its rivals, is capable of handling both the Newcomb problems that challenge evidential decision theory and the (...)
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  36. Review of the book Algorithmic Desire: Toward a New Structuralist Theory of Social Media, by Matthew Flisfeder. [REVIEW]Jack Black - 2024 - Postdigital Science and Education 6 (2):691--704.
    It is this very contention that sits at the heart of Matthew Flisfeder’s, Algorithmic Desire: Towards a New Structuralist Theory of Social Media (2021). In spite of the accusation that, today, our social media is in fact hampering democracy and subjecting us to increasing forms of online and offline surveillance, for Flisfeder (2021: 3), ‘[s]ocial media remains the correct concept for reconciling ourselves with the structural contradictions of our media, our culture, and our society’. With almost every aspect of our (...)
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  37.  67
    Open‐Mindedness as Engagement.Jack M. C. Kwong - 2016 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 54 (1):70-86.
    Open-mindedness is an under-explored topic in virtue epistemology, despite its assumed importance for the field. Questions about it abound and need to be answered. For example, what sort of intellectual activities are central to it? Can one be open-minded about one's firmly held beliefs? Why should we strive to be open-minded? This paper aims to shed light on these and other pertinent issues. In particular, it proposes a view that construes open-mindedness as engagement, that is, a willingness to entertain novel (...)
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  38. Mathematics, Morality, and Self‐Effacement.Jack Woods - 2016 - Noûs 52 (1):47-68.
    I argue that certain species of belief, such as mathematical, logical, and normative beliefs, are insulated from a form of Harman-style debunking argument whereas moral beliefs, the primary target of such arguments, are not. Harman-style arguments have been misunderstood as attempts to directly undermine our moral beliefs. They are rather best given as burden-shifting arguments, concluding that we need additional reasons to maintain our moral beliefs. If we understand them this way, then we can see why moral beliefs are vulnerable (...)
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  39.  4
    Experience as Art: Aesthetics in Everyday Life.Jack A. Hobbs - 1984 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 18 (2):120.
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  40. Just a game? Sport and psychoanalytic theory.Jack Black & Joseph S. Reynoso - 2024 - Psychoanalysis, Culture and Society 29 (2):145--159.
    Sport poses a number of important and no less significant questions, which, on the face of it, may not necessarily seem very important or significant to begin with – a peculiarity that we believe to be integral to sport itself. This article introduces, explores and outlines the psychoanalytic significance of this peculiarity. It explores how the emotions stirred by sport are intertwined with a realm of fiction and fantasy. Despite its lack of practical utility, sport carries an undeniable gravity, encapsulating (...)
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  41.  70
    Plurality and conjunction.Jack Hoeksema - 1983 - In Alice G. B. Ter Meulen (ed.), Studies in Modeltheoretic Semantics. Foris Publications. pp. 1--63.
  42.  42
    The limits of international law.Jack L. Goldsmith - 2007 - New York: Oxford University Press. Edited by Eric A. Posner.
    A theory of customary international law -- Case studies -- A theory of international agreements -- Human rights -- International trade -- A theory of international rhetoric -- International law and moral obligation -- Liberal democracy and cosmopolitan duty.
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  43. Unconscious Evidence.Jack Lyons - 2016 - Philosophical Issues 26 (1):243-262.
    Can beliefs that are not consciously formulated serve as part of an agent's evidence for other beliefs? A common view says no, any belief that is psychologically immediate is also epistemically immediate. I argue that some unconscious beliefs can serve as evidence, but other unconscious beliefs cannot. Person-level beliefs can serve as evidence, but subpersonal beliefs cannot. I try to clarify the nature of the personal/subpersonal distinction and to show how my proposal illuminates various epistemological problems and provides a principled (...)
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  44. Relativity and Degrees of Relationality.Jack Spencer - 2014 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 92 (2):432-459.
    Some well-known metaphysical arguments against relativism rest on the claim that relativity somehow must be accompanied by relationality. I argue otherwise, and trace the consequences for some prominent disputes between relativists and absolutists.
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  45.  14
    Basic Design: Systems, Elements, Applications.Jack A. Hobbs, John Adkins Richardson, Floyd W. Coleman & Michael J. Smith - 1984 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 18 (3):121.
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  46.  37
    Essay Review: William Whewell: Rough Diamond, Defining Science: William Whewell, Natural Knowledge, and Public Debate in Early Victorian Britain.Jack Morrell - 1994 - History of Science 32 (3):345-359.
  47. A Lewisian Argument Against Platonism, or Why Theses About Abstract Objects Are Unintelligible.Jack Himelright - 2023 - Erkenntnis 88 (7):3037–3057.
    In this paper, I argue that all expressions for abstract objects are meaningless. My argument closely follows David Lewis’ argument against the intelligibility of certain theories of possible worlds, but modifies it in order to yield a general conclusion about language pertaining to abstract objects. If my Lewisian argument is sound, not only can we not know that abstract objects exist, we cannot even refer to or think about them. However, while the Lewisian argument strongly motivates nominalism, it also undermines (...)
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  48. An Individual Reality, Separate from Oneself: Alienation and Sociality in Moral Theory.Jack Samuel - 2021 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    I argue that the social dimension of alienation, as discussed by Williams and Railton, has been underappreciated. The lesson typically drawn from their exchange is that moral theory poses a threat to the internal integrity of the agent, but there is a parallel risk that moral theory will implicitly construe agents as constitutively alienated from one another. I argue that a satisfying account of agency will need to make room for what I call ‘genuine ethical contact’ with others, both as (...)
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  49. Epistemic Injustice and Open‐Mindedness.Jack M. C. Kwong - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (2):337-351.
    In this paper, I argue that recent discussions of culprit-based epistemic injustices can be framed around the intellectual character virtue of open-mindedness. In particular, these injustices occur because the people who commit them are closed-minded in some respect; the injustices can therefore be remedied through the cultivation of the virtue of open-mindedness. Describing epistemic injustices this way has two explanatory benefits: it yields a more parsimonious account of the phenomenon of epistemic injustice and it provides the underpinning of a virtue-theoretical (...)
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  50. Video Meliora Proboque, Deteriora Sequor: Leibniz on the Intellectual Source of Sin.Jack D. Davidson - 2005 - In Donald Rutherford & J. A. Cover (eds.), Leibniz: nature and freedom. New York: Oxford University Press.
     
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